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I need to work on my memory retention power badly. There is a lot of brainpower I have lost in recent 4 years due to emotional stress and breakdowns. My career demands focus, concentration, memory retention. Is this psycho related? Can there be a timely cure to this? If yes, then what?

2 Doctors Answered
I need to work on my memory retention power badly. There ...
Avoid stress on brain. Take proper sleep at night. Focus on work. Drink mineral water. Eat green veg. Fruits. Take bhrahmi.
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I need to work on my memory retention power badly. There ...
Hi, Deep breathing helps to increase your blood flow and oxygen levels, which in turn help your brain to function better. Doing 10-15 minutes of deep breathing each day can help in the long run, but especially doing some deep breathing before and during your studying (and even while you're taking your exam) not only helps keep oxygen and blood flow helping your brain, but it also keeps your anxiety levels down, also helping your brain function better. When you're breathing make sure that you breathe into the bottom of your lungs. Think of it like a balloon expanding, first your belly, then your chest, then your neck. When you let the breath go, it will go in the opposite direction, neck, chest, then belly. Take a break. A good way to help your brain charged up is to take a break. This can either mean cruising the Internet for 15 minutes, or switching to something else for a while, as a change of pace for your brain. It's also a good idea to spend no more than an hour on something before switching to something else for a while. If you haven't finished that something in an hour, set aside time later to work on it some more Eat brain-boosting food. There are lots of different foods that can help boost your brainpower. Conversely, some foods — foods high in sugar and refined carbohydrates" junk food" and soda — dull brain processes and make you foggy and sluggish. Try foods that are high in omega-3 fatty acids like walnuts and salmon (although eat this sparingly because of the possibility of a higher mercury content), ground flaxseed, winter squash, kidney and pinto beans, spinach, broccoli, pumpkin seeds, and soybeans. Omega-3 fatty acids improve blood circulation, and boost the function of neurotransmitters, which help your brain process and think. Get enough exercise. Physical exercise can do things like enhance the oxygen flow to your brain, which will help it better process and function. It also releases chemicals that enhance your overall mood, as well as protect your brain cells. Scientists have found that exercising actually helps spark the production of more neurons in the brain.[4] Dance and martial arts are especially good ways to boost your brainpower, because they stimulate a wide variety of brain systems, including organization, coordination, planning, and judgement. You're having to move your body (and various parts of it, too) in synch with the music. Learn to meditate. Meditation, especially mindfulness meditation, can help to retrain the brain to work better and to not go down certain negative neuro-pathways. Meditation both reduces stress (which helps the brain function better), but it also increases memory, as well. Find a place to sit quietly, even if only for 15 minutes. Focus on your breathing. Say to yourself as you breathe" breathing in, breathing out. Whenever you find your mind wandering, gently draw it back to focusing on your breath. As you get better at meditating, notice what is going on around you, feel the sun on your face, notice the sound of the birds and the cars outside, smell your roommate's pasta lunch. Most importantly, get enough sleep and get organized.
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