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I am 27 years old and I am suffering from constipation from last one year what should I do? I have consulted many doctors but no result.

1 Doctor Answered
I am 27 years old and I am suffering from constipation fr...
Hi. Try these steps: Drink two to four extra glasses of water a day (unless your doctor told you to limit fluids for another health reason). Try warm liquids, especially in the morning. Add fruits and vegetables to your diet. Eat prunes and bran cereal. Isabgol, also known as" psyllium husk, is a common health supplement used to treat constipation, other digestive problems, and a few non-digestive problems. It contains 70 percent soluble fiber and, as a result, acts as a bulk-forming laxative. The effectiveness of isabgol largely depends on your individual health needs and the manner in which you take it. Usually, you will need to take 1 to 2 tsp (5 to 10 ml) of isabgol with 1 cup of water (240 ml) or fluid daily at night until your constipation passes. The exact dosage may vary depending on age, medical condition, and response to treatment, however. Eat a well-balanced diet with plenty of fiber. Good sources of fiber are fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole-grain bread and cereal (especially bran). Drink 1 1/2 to 2 quarts of water and other fluids a day (unless your doctor has you on a fluid-restricted diet). Fiber and water work together to keep you regular. Avoid caffeine. It can be dehydrating. Check on milk. Some people may need to avoid it because dairy products may be constipating for them. Exercise regularly. Go to the bathroom when you feel the urge. Medication: Take Schwabe’s Biocombination-4/ thrice daily for 4 weeks.
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