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Whether knee replacement can be avoided? If yes how? ULTRASONIC THERAPY can reduce the problem?

1 Doctor Answered
As arthritis is very common that you get generally bilaterally. Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. We also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. Simple Knee ExerciesSpecific knee exercises will also help ie. Keeping ball underneath the knee and keep pressing it. That's the simple exercise which will help you to strengthen the knee Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. We also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. I also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. Knee pain more than 2 weeks:if your knee is paining since 2 weeks, then you have to rethink whether you had any injury in the previous years. I also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. As arthritis is very common if anyone would've neglected any injury in the previous years. You can take Ultrasonic therapy in one of the nearby physiotherapy clinics which would help to heal the damaged cartilages along with shortwave diathermy which would help to improve the blood circulation. Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. You may do all of these exercises right away. It’s important to stretch the muscles in the back and on the side of your leg. It is also important to strengthen the muscles in your hip and on the top of your thigh so your kneecap won't dislocate again. •Standing hamstring stretch: Put the heel of the leg on your injured side on a stool about 15 inches high. Keep your leg straight. Lean forward, bending at the hips, until you feel a mild stretch in the back of your thigh. Make sure you don't roll your shoulders or bend at the waist when doing this or you will stretch your lower back instead of your leg. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. •Quad sets: Sit on the floor with your injured leg straight and your other leg bent. Press the back of the knee of your injured leg against the floor by tightening the muscles on the top of your thigh. Hold this position 10 seconds. Relax. Do 2 sets of 15. •Straight leg raise: Lie on your back with your legs straight out in front of you. Bend the knee on your uninjured side and place the foot flat on the floor. Tighten the thigh muscle on your injured side and lift your leg about 8 inches off the floor. Keep your leg straight and your thigh muscle tight. Slowly lower your leg back down to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. •Side-lying leg lift: Lie on your uninjured side. Tighten the front thigh muscles on your injured leg and lift that leg 8 to 10 inches (20 to 25 centimeters) away from the other leg. Keep the leg straight and lower it slowly. Do 2 sets of 15. •Prone hip extension: Lie on your stomach with your legs straight out behind you. Fold your arms under your head and rest your head on your arms. Draw your belly button in towards your spine and tighten your abdominal muscles. Tighten the buttocks and thigh muscles of the leg on your injured side and lift the leg off the floor about 8 inches. Keep your leg straight. Hold for 5 seconds. Then lower your leg and relax. Do 2 sets of 15. •Step-up: Stand with the foot of your injured leg on a support 3 to 5 inches (8 to 13 centimeters) high --like a small step or block of wood. Keep your other foot flat on the floor. Shift your weight onto the injured leg on the support. Straighten your injured leg as the other leg comes off the floor. Return to the starting position by bending your injured leg and slowly lowering your uninjured leg back to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. •Wall squat with a ball: Stand with your back, shoulders, and head against a wall. Look straight ahead. Keep your shoulders relaxed and your feet 3 feet (90 centimeters) from the wall and shoulder's width apart. Place a soccer or basketball-sized ball behind your back. Keeping your back against the wall, slowly squat down to a 45-degree angle. Your thighs will not yet be parallel to the floor. Hold this position for 10 seconds and then slowly slide back up the wall. Repeat 10 times. Build up to 2 sets of 15.
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