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My child hyper active I don’t know how to handle him? No one wants to play with him. He feels very lonely sometimes he has even no friends by nature he very good boy he is very sharp minded but I don’t where he is going wrong? please help me I am very stressed.

1 Doctor Answered
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects children and teens and can continue into adulthood. ADHD is the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorder of children. Children with ADHD may be hyperactive and unable control their impulses. Or they may have trouble paying attention. These behaviors interfere with school and home life. It’s more common in boys than in girls. It’s usually discovered during the early school years, when a child begins to have problems paying attention. Symptoms are grouped into three categories: Inattention. Is easily distracted Doesn't follow directions or finish tasks Doesn't appear to be listening Doesn't pay attention and makes careless mistakes Forgets about daily activities Has problems organizing daily tasks Doesn’t like to do things that require sitting still Often loses things Tends to daydream Hyperactivity. Often squirms, fidgets, or bounces when sitting Doesn't stay seated Has trouble playing quietly Is always moving, such as running or climbing on things (In teens and adults, this is more commonly described as restlessness.) Talks excessively Is always “on the go” as if “driven by a motor” Impulsivity. Has trouble waiting for his or her turn Blurts out answers Interrupts others Consult a psychiatrist, if he has even few of these symptoms mentioned above, child needs detailed psychological evaluation and then treatment. All the best.
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