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Sir I am 23 years old and I have belly. I try crunches and walking to reduce it but it can't so please give me diet and some list of exercises to reduce belly within 1 year.

1 Doctor Answered
Hye. Thank you for your query. The pinchable fat you see is belly fat, also known as subcutaneous fat which increases due to bad food habits and sedentary lifestyle. While you can accumulate this type of fat by eating more calories than your body burns, there's a genetic and hormonal connection as well. Too much fat is harmful for the body. A diet filled with refined carbs, such as white bread packaged foods and junk, snack foods, is associated with increased subcutaneous belly fat. Thirty minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise -- like a fast-paced walk or low-impact aerobics -- most days of the week helps you lose the belly flab. Alos, don't forget strength-training. You can't spot reduce, but you can tone and tighten your belly. While crunches and planks can help the abdominal area, include exercises that work all your major muscles -- arms, back, shoulders, glutes and legs is import for balance. Making the right food choices can also help you lose subcutaneous fat. Just cutting down food intake randomly or crashing diet is not going to solve the problem. Be sensible with food intake. Limit your intake of the refined carbs linked to belly fat. So, skip the white bread, packaged cereals, sugary cereals, biscuits, sweets and soda, and, instead, eat more whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Enjoy healthy sources of protein such as poultry, lean beef, fish, eggs, soy, beans, low-fat dairy, and fats such as vegetable oil, nuts and seeds. Eating healthy foods is critical to reduce belly fats.
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