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Hi, I have stuttering due to anxiety, mine is altogether a different kind of stuttering from that I have seen in other stutterers. I don't always stutter, it's only when I think about it the problem comes in, whenever I'm not conscious about it, I don't have any problem, whenever I'm heavily engaged in some work or if I'm really concentrated in something I don't stutter. When ever Im to deliver a public speech this fear from within kicks in and I stutter. I tried different ways to contain it, but some methods have bee n counter productive, Is there any solution for this problem? I have heard that stuttering can't be cured entirely, but I have not been a stutterer throughout my life, I had stuttering during my lower school, high school I did not have that much of a problem. In my college days, problem started again, and now Im working in a company, I'm in my worst ever state now. Please help me in getting rid of this. Thanks,

2 Doctors Answered
Vishnu social anxiety is associated with stuttering . Homeopathy along with psychotherapy seem important. For the detailed you can consult me online through Lybrate
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Stammering is typically recognised by a tense struggle to get words out. This makes it different from the normal non-fluency we all experience which includes hesitations and repetitions. Commonly it involves repeating or prolonging sounds or words, or getting stuck without any sound (silent blocking). Sometimes people put in extra sounds or words. Often people lose eye contact.
Some people who stammer talk their way round difficult words so that you may not realise they stammer at all. This avoidance of words, and avoidance of speaking in some or many situations, is an important aspect of stammering.
Stammering varies tremendously from person to person and is highly variable for the person who stammers who may be fluent one minute and struggling to speak the next.
Get an mri brain and eeg with a psychiatrist evaluation.
1 person found this helpful
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