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Dr. Sabina

Gynaecologist, Pune

500 at clinic
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Dr. Sabina Gynaecologist, Pune
500 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. Sabina
Dr. Sabina is a renowned Gynaecologist in Karve Road, Pune. You can visit him/her at Dwidal Hospital, Karve Road in Karve Road, Pune. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Sabina on has top trusted Gynaecologists from across India. You will find Gynaecologists with more than 43 years of experience on You can find Gynaecologists online in Pune and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.


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Dwidal Hospital, Karve Road

#10/15 A, Erandwane, Karve Road, Karve Nagar, PunePune Get Directions
500 at clinic
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I got married last month oct 6th I got my periods on oct 13 after tat in nov month I did not get my regular periods I tested urine test but it was negative but I feel nausea what should I do?

MBBS, MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, FMAS, DMAS
Gynaecologist, Noida
I got married last month oct 6th I got my periods on oct 13 after tat in nov month I did not get my regular periods I...
Hello, Please get a serum beta hcg test done to conclusively rule out pregnancy, if negative then you can safely wait for your menses to return.
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My wife delivered a child on 23rd of December 2015. Is it safe to have sex without any protection during 2 to 3 months after birth. Or is it a myth.

Diploma in Family Medicine, M.Sc - Psychotherapy
Sexologist, Pune
Yes it is a myth that women do not get pregnant during breast feeding months. Some women get pregnant when before they get their next menstrual period. It is better to always use protection,
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I have problem of pcod from last 2 years and I trying to conceive what can I do my Dr. give me some medicine.

Homeopath, Sindhudurg
I have problem of pcod from last 2 years and I trying to conceive what can I do my Dr. give me some medicine.
Here is a list of fooditems that shows what to have and what to avoid in diet for PCOS. IncludeWhole wheat productsWhole grain / whole wheat breadwholegrain / whole wheat pasta Barley, natural diuretic fruitsOats, cornRaw fruits and vegetablesFresh fishLean meatsProtein shakesAvoid Refined flour products / maida, White bread, white pasta, Fast foods, Cakes,cookies, sweets, chocolates, Raw fruits and vegetables, Soft drinks and soda, Bengali mithai, sweets, desserts.
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Is it safe to take X Rays during pregnancy without knowing that the patient is pregnant.

MBBS, MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Gorakhpur
Is it safe to take X Rays during pregnancy without knowing that the patient is pregnant.
No it can harm the foetus so before doing xray insure patient is not pregnant if not sure of dates then put abdominal guard on tummy n then do x ray ok.
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Prenatal Pregnancy Check-up!

MBBS, DNB(ob/gy)
Gynaecologist, Delhi
Prenatal Pregnancy Check-up!

What is Prenatal care?

It is crucial for a woman who is on her way to becoming a mother to pay special attention to her health. Health care offered to a pregnant woman is also known as prenatal care or antenatal care. It is a very important phase in a woman's life, so go for regular prenatal checkups as they go a long way in reducing risks of complications during pregnancy and child birth. This, in turn, increases the chances of giving birth to a healthy baby.
Contrary to popular belief, prenatal care does not begin when a woman is told that she is pregnant. Prenatal care should ideally be started at least three months before you try to conceive a child. This prepares your body and mind for the changes that pregnancy will bring. Some healthy habits to follow during this period include:

  • Quit Drinking alcohol and smoking
  • Consult a gynecologist about any existing medical conditions, medication you may be on and what supplements you should start taking
  • Avoid contact with chemicals and toxic substances

Once your pregnancy is confirmed, you will need to visit the doctor regularly for checkups.

Prenatal checkups are meant to keep an eye on your health and the health of your baby. In most cases, you will be asked to come in every month for the first two trimesters and every two weeks during the seventh and eighth month of your pregnancy. During the ninth month, your doctor may want to see you once a week until the delivery. In cases where a pregnancy is considered high risk because of existing medical conditions, the age of the mother or any other factors, the doctor may ask a for more frequent checkups.

A prenatal checkup involves a physical examination, tests, screenings and dietary consultations. Some of the common tests include blood tests to check for HIV, the mother’s blood type and anemia. Your blood pressure will also be monitored. When it comes to the baby’s health, determining the rate at which the baby is growing and heart rate are most important. In the later stages of your pregnancy, the position of the baby will also be noted. It is important to not skip these checkups even if you are feeling fine.

Keep your doctor informed about any changes you may notice in your health. Do not take any medication without consulting your doctor even if it is for something as simple as a cold. Do not feel shy about talking to your doctor and ask him or her anything you would like to about your pregnancy and childbirth. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gynaecologist.

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Will it pain after having sex for the first time. and if yes then how long will it pain?

MBBS, MS - Obstetrics & Gynecology, Fellowship in Infertility (IVF Specialist)
Gynaecologist, Aurangabad
Will it pain after having sex for the first time.
and if yes then how long will it pain?
hi lybrate user, pain after sex is subjective feeling, sometimes it pains. but not very sever. their could be slight period like bleeding after sex.
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Some Tips from Ayurveda-14

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Ahmedabad
Some Tips from Ayurveda-14

Some tips from Ayurveda-14

1.  Diabetes – Take 5 - 5 gram powder mixure of Amla, Turmeric and Guduchi ( Tinospora Cordifolia) with water twice a day.

2.  Pyorrhoea – Take 2 tabs Trifla gugal twice a day. Use Dashan sankar churna as tooth powder. Use Jatyadi tail or Irimedadi tail for gargle.

3.  Pleurisy – Take Pushkarmool churna 1 to 2 grams twice a day with honey. Keep heating with hot water bag or heating pad.

4.  Anaemia – Use Harde powder with cow urine twice a day.

1 person found this helpful

Anemia During Pregnancy

General Physician, Gorakhpur
Anemia During Pregnancy

Anemia during pregnancy is a common condition and a worrisome one. Therefore, understanding the details of anemia, its causes, symptoms and potential treatments is important.

What is anemia during pregnancy?

Anemia is a condition that can affect anyone and is defined as a deficiency in iron, an essential mineral in our body. Anemia during pregnancy is a common affliction of pregnant women, due to many physical and hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy.

Any deficiency in nutrients can be fatal and leaves your body without the key resources it needs, but this can be a dangerous concern during pregnancy. Iron is an essential mineral in the production of red blood cells and hemoglobin, which is necessary to carry oxygen and other nutrients to different areas of the body. Expecting mothers contribute a large amount of their nutrient intake to their growing fetus ;which makes it even more important for them to ensure that their nutrient levels are adequate.

Unlike traditional anemia, which can affect anyone during pregnancy, it is risky, especially during the first and the third trimester.

During third trimester

In the third trimester, the final three months of a pregnancy term, there is a particular risk of anemia. Even if you aren’t anemic at the start of your pregnancy, the chances of being anemic get high by the end of your term. Approximately 15-20% of women experience anemia during pregnancy. Having anemia during the third trimester can increase the risk of a pre-term baby or a low birth weight of the baby.

Having anemia during your late pregnancy term will also increase the risk of fetal anemia, which is rare, but extremely dangerous, and can even lead to heart failure or death of the fetus.


  • The causes of anemia during pregnancy include loss of blood, natural fetal development, poor diet and pre-existing chronic disease.
  • Loss of blood: if you suffer from heavy menstruation or have a bleeding disorder, you are at a much higher risk of anemia during pregnancy. This basic loss of blood will require the body to produce more hemoglobin and red blood cells, putting a strain on your iron reserves.
  • Fetal development: as the fetus grows within the womb, it will require its own supply of blood, independent of the mother. This is a large sink for iron intake, and is the primary reason for anemia during pregnancy, albeit an unavoidable one.
  • Unique pregnancy: for women who have recently had a pregnancy, or if you are carrying multiples (twins, triplets etc.), the risk of anemia during pregnancy is considerably high.
  • Poor diet: the main source of iron in your body comes from dietary choices. A diet that is low in protein or high in sugars and fats can unbalance your nutrient levels, leading to anemia.
  • Chronic disease: certain chronic diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory conditions can decrease your body’s ability to produce hemoglobin, leading to anemia.


Contrary to popular belief, anemia is not exclusively caused by a deficiency in iron. While a lack of iron causes 80-95% of anemia cases, deficiencies in other essential compounds can also result in anemic symptoms.

1. Iron-deficiency anemia

This is the most common form of anemia caused by a lack of iron in the body. It limits your body’s ability to produce hemoglobin and deliver oxygen to the necessary organ systems and tissues.

2. Folate-deficiency anemia

Folic acid is a part of the b family of vitamins and is closely linked to metabolic processes and the risk of neural tube defects in a fetus. While rarer than iron-deficiency anemia, it still requires specialized treatment to bring folate concentration back to a healthy level.

3. Vitamin b12 deficiency anemia

Pernicious anemia is a rare form of anemia in which your body attacks the cells in the stomach that are required to absorb vitamin b12. Without this essential vitamin, similar to a lack of iron, your body is unable to produce red blood cells.


Some of the most common symptoms of anemia during pregnancy are fatigue, shortness of breath, irritability, dizziness, muscle weakness, preeclampsia and irregular heartbeat, among others.

1. Fatigue:

Exhaustion is one of the first and most notable symptoms of anemia, making you feel physically sluggish and cognitively slow.

2. Muscle weakness:

Without proper oxygenation, muscles are unable to function properly, leading to muscle aches, soreness, and general weakness.

3. High blood pressure:

Preeclampsia, high blood pressure duringpregnancy, can be a very serious symptom of anemia during pregnancy, and will often require additional treatment to keep under control.

4. Breathing problems:

The physical exhaustion caused by anemia and the lack of oxygen to organ systems can make normal respiration a struggle. This can also cause dizziness in some pregnancies.

5. Irregular heartbeat:

Tachycardia is a potentially life-threatening symptom of anemia during pregnancy, in which your heart “skips” beats. This can lead to more complicated cardiovascular issues during pregnancy.


If you suspect that you are experiencing anemia during pregnancy, a visit to the doctor is highly recommended. They can perform a simple blood test to determine your levels of hemoglobin. This is the most reliable and rapid means of determining whether you are experiencing anemia during pregnancy.


Given, how common it is for women to experience anemia during pregnancy, there are a number of formal treatments, as well as home remedies and natural therapies that can prevent or effectively treat this condition.

1. Iron supplements

This is the easiest and most common recommendation for addressing anemia during pregnancy. Though iron supplements may increase the concentration of iron in the body, the greater issue may be an inability to absorb iron, which can be mitigated by vitamin c intake.

2. Prenatal vitamins

Considered a preventative measure, more than a treatment option, prenatal vitamins can ensure that your iron levels remain adequate throughout pregnancy.

3. Iron-rich diet

Your dietary choices will have the largest impact on the amount of iron in your body. Within the boundaries of your pregnancy diet, add foods like spinach, red meat, legumes, high-starch foods and dried fruit.

4. Vitamin c intake

Ascorbic acid is critical to iron absorption in the gut. By ensuring that you have proper levels of vitamin c, you can effectively avoid anemia during pregnancy. Include foods like citrus fruits, leafy green vegetables and bell peppers in your diet for better results.

Vitamin b1 deficiency

I had two days delay in my period now is out and I'm bleeding like never before with thick blood coming out and my stool is black don't know if is because I ate more iron food than before.

DHMS (Hons.)
Homeopath, Patna
I had two days delay in my period now is out and I'm bleeding like never before with thick blood coming out and my st...
Hello menstrual disorder is caused due to stress, anxiety,depression, malnutrition,anaemia, over exertion, Pcod, thyroidism ,results in  ,delayed, painful,excess & frequent blood flow during menstruation. * Tk, plenty of water to hydrate yourself ,to eliminate toxins & to dilute your blood to establish your flow by regulating metabolism to absorb neutrients to nourish your body.  * go for meditation to reduce your stress, anxiety to calm your nerve to ease your stress, improving Oxygen volume in blood in order, to establish your smooth flow, improving haemoglobin level. * your diet be simple, non- irritant, easily digestible on time to maintain your digestion, avoiding gastric disorder. •TK, Apple,carrots, cheese,milk, banana,papaya, pomegranate, spinach,almonds, walnuts to improve your haemoglobin to release your flow, timely. • Tk, Homoeo medicine, gentle & rapid in action with no adverse effect, thereof. @ Pulsatilla 200-6 pills, thrice. @ Sepia200 -6 pills, thrice. * Ensure, sound sleep in d night for at least 7 hrs. •Avoid, caffiene,junkfood, dust,smoke, exertion •Your feedback will highly b appreciated for further, follow up.•Tk, care,
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Hi before 3 months I got pregnancy and it was aborted due to baby heart beat was not there so want thing I can expect the same thing.

MD - Maternity & Child Health
Gynaecologist, Bangalore
you wait for gap of 6 months and plan for next pregnancy. Usually your problem will not be repeated.
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