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Dr. Vijaya Kumar - Veterinarian, Lawspet

Dr. Vijaya Kumar

92 (83 ratings)
MVSc

Veterinarian, Lawspet

1 Years Experience  ·  250 at clinic  ·  ₹100 online
Dr. Vijaya Kumar 92% (83 ratings) MVSc Veterinarian, Lawspet
1 Years Experience  ·  250 at clinic  ·  ₹100 online
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My service to the animals will be endless & forever,...more
My service to the animals will be endless & forever,
More about Dr. Vijaya Kumar
He has been a practicing Veterinarian for 3 years. He has done MVSc. Don?t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Vijaya Kumar on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 26 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Lawspet. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
MVSc - Rajiv Gandhi Veterinary College, Pondicherry - 2017
Past Experience
Veterinarian at Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Veterinary Education and Research
Languages spoken
English
Tamil
Professional Memberships
372/PSVC/2014 Pondicherry State Veterinary Council

Location

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Dr.Vijayakumar

No12, 23rd Cross, Avvai NagarLawspet Get Directions
  4.6  (83 ratings)
250 at clinic
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Patient Review Highlights

"Saved my life" 2 reviews "Caring" 2 reviews "Very helpful" 3 reviews "Professional" 2 reviews "knowledgeable" 4 reviews "Well-reasoned" 1 review "Thorough" 1 review

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My german shepherd was really facing a big problem with his front left limb even it started limping. I consult my vet and he said your dog was facing a problem with deficiency of calcium. So, please suggest me a better calcium supplement and dosage. Thank you.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
U can give skycal syrup around 5 ml morning and night daily. But I think it may not only be calcium deficiency, it may be also becoz of any sprain, strain, obesity and some other causes, did your vet palate the leg of your dog, did you took scan, since how many days its limping, what's age of your dog and weight of your dog.
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My cat get pregnant third time and I don't want to spayed her, so is there any another kind of non surgical way like injections or pills to avoid her pregnancy.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
Yes, there are medicines available for aborting cats too similar to humans, but before using that kindly show your pet to a nearby vet, so that he can check out how many days its pregnant and can see about its health status and he will prescribe the medicine.
2 people found this helpful
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Sir I have given normetro syrup to my puppy is this safe have given him 2 ml only.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
Yes you can give the syrup to your pup, but kindly calculate the dose rate of the syrup according your pup body weight and give.
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8 Tips To Keep Your Pets Calm During Diwali Time

MVSc
Veterinarian,
8 Tips To Keep Your Pets Calm During Diwali Time

Cracker sounds are a stress for most pets – and can leave owners pretty frazzled too.

According to figures from the RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) , 45% of dogs show signs of fear when they hear loud bangs.

And 65% of owners feel anxious for their pet as the bangers go off.

But with Diwali celebrations starting, planning can take the stress out during crackers bursting. Here’s ten things you can do to help:

1. Create a safe den or hideaway, like this cat tent, right. Before fireworks night, put treats, toys and blankets there so pets associate it with positive experiences. The RSPCA’s Professor Daniel Mills said: “Dogs learn this place is safe and enjoyable. So when fireworks go off they may go there because they know no harm will come to them.”

2. Keep pets indoors. Cats should stay in and dogs walked in daylight.

3. Close curtains and play music or leave the TV on to muffle firework noise.

4. Protect small animals. Rabbits, guinea pigs or birds should be given extra bedding to burrow in and have an area of their cage or hutch covered with blankets.

5. Try letting pets smell essential oils – they can help to relax and soothe them.Use plug in pheromone diffusers.

6. Try calming supplements in their food.

7. Play with pets so they are tired and may sleep through the day.

8. Don’t punish a pet for reacting to noise – it will make things worse.

I have a kingfisher bird n I notice hs feather is falling any medication pls suggest.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
You can give multivitamin drops, kindly notice that the bird is pecking itself in aggressive manner, if so it may be due to nite infection also.
1 person found this helpful
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Poultry Feed Formulation

MVSc
Veterinarian,
Poultry Feed Formulation

Formulation of 50 kg bag (broiler feed)

Broilers have different feed requirements in terms of energy, proteins, and minerals during different stages of their growth.Therefore, it is important that farmers adapt feed rations to these requirements for maximum production. Young broilers have a high protein requirement for the development of muscles, feathers, etc. As the broilers grow, their energy requirements for the deposit of fat increase and their protein requirements decrease. They require high protein content in their starter rations than in the grower and finisher rations. Broilers should have a feed that has between 22 – 24 per cent digestible crude protein, DCP.

 

The following guidelines can help the farmer to make the right feed at each stage of growth:

  • 7.2kg of whole maize
  • 11.9kg of maize germ
  • 9.5kg of wheat pollard
  • 7.2kg wheat bran
  • 4.3kg of cotton seed cake
  • 3.4kg of sunflower cake
  • 2.1kg of fishmeal
  • 1.4kg of lime
  • 2.5kg of soya meal
  • 45g of bone meal
  • 10g of grower PMX
  • 5g of salt
  • 5g of coccidiostat 
  •  5g of Zincbacitrach

 Broiler starter feed (1-4 weeks)

  • 28.6kg of whole maize
  • 8.6kg of fishmeal
  • 10kg of soya bean meal
  • 2.9kg of lime
  • 70g of premix

Amino acids to add

  •  35g of lysine
  •  35g of threonine

Preparing of layers chick mash (1-4 weeks)

chicks require feed with Digestible Crude Protein (DCP) of between 18 to 20 per cent. Amino acids are important nutrients in all feeds in order to make a complete feed for all animals. For hybrid chickens, the addition of amino acids is very important to maintain a balanced diet for fast growth

(50 kg bag of chick mash)

  • 22.5kg of whole maize
  • 6.5kg of wheat bran,
  • 5.0 kg of wheat pollard,
  • 12 kg of sunflower (or 12 kg of linseed),
  • 1.1 kg of fishmeal
  • 1.25 kg of lime
  • 30g of salt
  • 20g of premix

Amino acids to be added

  • 70g of tryptophan
  • 3.0g of lysine
  • 10g of methionine
  • 70 g of threonine
  • 50g of enzymes
  • 60g of coccidiostat
  • 50g of toxin binder


 To make a 50 kg bag growers feed (1 to 8 weeks), it is very necessary that pullets or young layers should be provided with a feed having a protein content of between 16 and 18 per cent. Such feed makes the pullet to grow fast and prepare for egg laying.

Note:  Layers’ feed should never be fed to chickens younger than 18 weeks as it contains calcium that can damage their kidneys (they can develop kidney stones), which interfere with egg production and also shorten their lifespan. Grit (sand) should be provided to growers that are not on free range to aid in digestion.

70 kg bag layer mash (18 weeks and above)

  • 24.3kg of whole maize
  • 8.6kg of Soya
  • 5.7kg of fishmeal
  • 7.1kg of maize bran, rice germ or wheat bran
  • 4.3 kg of lime
  • 180g premix

Amino acids to be added

  • 70g lysine
  • 35g methionine
  • 70kg threonine
  • 35g tryptophan
  • 50g toxin binder

Note: Layer feed should contain a Digestible Crude Protein (DCP) content of between 16-18 per cent. Calcium is important for the formation of eggshells (Laying hens that do not get enough calcium will use the calcium stored in their own bone tissue to produce eggshells). Layer feed should be introduced at 18 weeks.

 Important tips

  • When making home made feed rations, it is important to do experimental trials. Isolate a number of chickens, feed them and observing their performance. If the feed rations are right, the broilers will grow fast and the layers will increase egg production (at least 1 egg after every 27 hours).
  • Farmers should be very careful with the quality of feed ingredients or raw materials. Poultry, especially chickens are very sensitive to feeds that contain mycotoxins which are present in most of the raw materials. Never use rotten maize to make chicken feed.
  • Buy quality fishmeal from reputable companies. If omena(silver cyprinid) is used the farmers must be sure of its quality; most of the omena in the open-air markets may be contaminated.
  • It is very important to mix all the micronutrients (amino acids) first before mixing with the rest of the feed.
  • For mixing, farmers are advised to use a drum mixer (many welding artisans can make one). Never use a shovel to mix feed because the ingredients will be unevenly distributed.
  • Never use rotten raw materials like maize to make feed. Rotten materials might contain mycotoxins which are detrimental to poultry health.
  • Small scale families can contribute resources to the making of feed to ensure high-quality feed materials are used and also reduce costs.

Note: To improve on the feed quality, farmers making their own feeds should always have it tested to ensure the feed is well balanced.You can take your feed samples to agro-chemical industries for testing to ensure the feeds are balanced nutritionally.

 

2 people found this helpful

Benefits of Dogs and Children Growing Up Together!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Constant Companionship

Although childhood isn't always easy, having a pet provides constant companionship through the ups and downs. Dogs can be a great source of comfort for kids — even when they're coming to grips with difficult life lessons. Whenever kids feel sad, angry, or afraid, they can always turn to their pet. Petting and cuddling dogs has also been shown to relieve stress and help people relax.

2. A More Active Lifestyle

Caring for a dog also encourages a more active lifestyle. In fact, a recent study showed that kids with dogs exercise eleven minutes a day more than their non-dog owning peers. That might not sound like a lot, but over a week or month, it really adds up. Many dogs require daily walks or runs and plenty of play time. Those adorable puppy eyes they give you are sure to motivate you — even when you're not feeling up to it.

3. Learning Responsibility

Having a pet is a great way to teach responsibility to kids. Making sure that the family dog has food and water gives children a first glimpse of accountability and obligation. Children also learn empathy and compassion by caring for their pet, while developing a higher level of self-esteem by taking care of their pet-owning responsibilities.

4. Health Is Wealth

Recent studies have found that babies raised in close contact with a pet get sick less often in their first year of life, meaning fewer visits to the doctor's office. Exposure to pet dander and the microbes that pets carry into the home from the outdoors is suggested to improve babies' developing immune systems. Research has also found that children who grow up with dogs experience a reduced risk of allergies.

5. Don't Worry, Be Happy!

Perhaps one of the greatest benefits of dogs in early childhood is simply that they make children happy! Interaction with animals has been proven to raise levels of serotonin and dopamine, which are the chemical building blocks of positive feelings. All science aside, playing and interacting with dogs is just plain fun — and it's bound to brighten any kid's day.

1 person found this helpful

5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

Summer Management For Dogs!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

Summer can mean lots of fun outside with your dog. But when the temps soar, take steps to protect your pet. Whether you take him for a walk down the street, a ride in the car, or just out in the yard to play, the heat can be hard on him. Here's how to keep your furry best friend safe.

1. Never leave your dog in the car. No, not even if you think you’ll only be a few minutes. Even when it isn’t that hot outside, the temp can soar inside a closed car. On an 85-degree day, it can reach 102 F within 10 minutes. And that's with a window cracked. After 30 minutes, it could be up to 120. Leave your dog at home, or go places where he can come with you.

2. Keep your house cool. If Fido’s home alone, make sure he can truly chill. Leave the air conditioner on and close the drapes. If you don't have AC, open the windows and turn on a fan. You may want to try a cooling vest or mat to see if they help.

3. Watch when you exercise. Limit when and how much you do when it's hot and humid. Take walks in the cooler part of the day, in the early morning and evening hours. Carry water, too -- enough for both of you.

4. Check the pavement. Before you head out for a walk, touch the pavement. If it's too hot for your hand, it's too hot for your dog's paw pads. Walk on the grass and stay off the asphalt. You also might want to try booties for your dog so his paws don’t burn.

5. Offer plenty of water and shade. Don't leave your pooch alone outside for long. And when he is there, make sure he has shade and lots of fresh, cool water. Add ice cubes when you can. Trees are better than doghouses for shade. They let air flow through. Doghouses can trap the heat and make it worse. Think about a kiddie pool or a sprinkler to help your pal cool off in the yard.Make cool treats. Help your canine chill from the inside out. For puppy popsicles, make ice cubes with tasty treats inside. Or fill and freeze a chew toy to make a chilly snack.

6. Keep an eye on the humidity, too. When the air is full of moisture, your dog may not be able to pant enough to cool himself off. That can raise his temperature, which can lead to heatstroke. Stay inside, and limit exercise, too.

7. Take care of at-risk dogs. Be watchful if you have a snub-nosed pet like a pug or bulldog. Their smaller airways make it harder for them to release heat when they pant. It's also easy for old and overweight dogs, or those with heart and breathing problems, to get heatstroke.

8. Groom your pet. If your dog has long hair, get rid of any mats and tangles. It will help keep him cool. Don't shave or clip his coat before you talk to your vet or groomer. The extra fur that keeps him warm in winter may also keep him cool in summer.

9. Watch for signs of overheating. Your dog can't tell you when he doesn't feel well, so keep an eye out for heatstroke, which can have these symptoms:

  • Heavy panting
  • Heavy drooling
  • Trouble breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dark or red gums and tongue
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Agitation
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