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Dr. Tejal Shetty

Pediatrician, Mumbai

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Dr. Tejal Shetty Pediatrician, Mumbai
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Personal Statement

Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Tejal Shetty
Dr. Tejal Shetty is a trusted Pediatrician in Andheri West, Mumbai. She is currently practising at Belle Vue Multispeciality Hospital in Andheri West, Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Tejal Shetty on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Pediatricians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Pediatricians with more than 38 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Belle Vue Multispeciality Hospital

The Link, 1st floor, Link Road Extension, Andheri West. Landmark: Next to Audi Showroom, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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Belle Vue Multispeciality Hospital

The Link, 1st floor, Link Road Extension, Andheri West. Landmark: Next to Audi Showroom.Mumbai Get Directions
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Sujay Hospital

25 Gulmohar Park, Juhu Scheme, Jvpd,Gulmohar Road, Juhu,Landmark: Near Talwalkar.Mumbai Get Directions
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My 11 months old daughter licks dirt from floor, paint from walls, or eats soap while bathing. She does this occasionally, not regularly. Please help.

MD Pediatric
Pediatrician, Mumbai
My 11 months old daughter licks dirt from floor, paint from walls, or eats soap while bathing.
She does this occasion...
These are symptoms of mineral deficiency. Get her evaluated by pediatrician to look for other signs of iron and calcium deficiency. Lab test for iron and calcium level in blood may be required. Deworming is also needed. You give her nutritious diet rich in calcium and iron. Give her plenty of milk products and green vegetables. If she is mainly on milk based diet, introduce family food in her diet. If you are already using iron and calcium supplements keep a gap of 2 hours between them as calcium interferes with iron absorption.
1 person found this helpful

Hello doctor, my baby is due for his 10th week vaccination. We were planning to give him the painful dose in the 6th week with pneumococcal as well as rotavirus vaccines. In a hurry I answered a yes for the painless one in the 6th week and have been feeling guilty since then. I wanted to switch to the painful one but 2-3 pediacs said it's better I don't. I wanted to know why is it so? Also wanted to know if the free vaccinations offered as per the NHM are safe or the ones given in private clinics are better? - concerned mother.

MD - Paediatrics, DNB (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Rourkela
Hello doctor, my baby is due for his 10th week vaccination. We were planning to give him the painful dose in the 6th ...
In view of recent 2013 California pertusis outbreak which revealed the waning immunity of acellular pertusis, IAP has categorically mentioned Whole cell pertusis for primary series. I.e 6 10 14 weeks vaccinations. Same problem is with Tdap also. Significant decrease of immunity after 2 to 4 year. Go for whole cell pertusis if no reaction had occurred previously. And go for all vaccines if you can afford.

Hi Doctor I got blesses with a baby girl on 6th may by caesarean. Both baby and mother are healthy. May I know when the baby can take bath.

MBBS MD DCH FRCP (LONDON), Dch
Pediatrician, Muzaffarpur
Hi Doctor I got blesses with a baby girl on 6th may by caesarean. Both baby and mother are healthy. May I know when t...
If your baby is stable that means taking feed appropriately then bath can be given on daily basis.
3 people found this helpful

Take Care of Your Child's Diet

MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad

Making appropriate food choices for your baby during the first year of life is very important. More growth occurs during the first year than at any other time in your child's life. It's important to feed your baby a variety of healthy foods at the proper time. Starting good eating habits at this early stage will help set healthy eating patterns for life.

Recommended feeding guide for the first year

Don't give solid foods unless your child's health care provider advises you to do so. Solid foods should not be started before age 4 months because:

  • Breast milk or formula provides your baby all the nutrients that are needed for growth.
  • Your baby isn't physically developed enough to eat solid food from a spoon.
  • Feeding your baby solid food too early may lead to overfeeding and being overweight.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all infants, children, and adolescents take in enough vitamin D through supplements, formula, or cow's milk to prevent complications from deficiency of this vitamin. In November 2008, the AAP updated its recommendations for daily intake of vitamin D for healthy infants, children, and adolescents. It is now recommended that the minimum intake of vitamin D for these groups should be 400 IU per day, beginning soon after birth. Your baby's health care provider can recommend the proper type and amount of vitamin D supplement for your baby.

Guide for formula feeding (0 to 5 months)

Age

Amount of formula per feeding

Number of feedings per 24 hours

1 month

2 to 4 ounces

6 to 8 times

2 months

5 to 6 ounces

5 to 6 times

3 to 5 months

6 to 7 ounces

5 to 6 times

Feeding tips for your child

These are some things to consider when feeding your baby:

  • When starting solid foods, give your baby one new food at a time — not mixtures (like cereal and fruit or meat dinners). Give the new food for 3 to 5 days before adding another new food. This way you can tell what foods your baby may be allergic to or can't tolerate.
  • Begin with small amounts of new solid foods — a teaspoon at first and slowly increase to a tablespoon.
  • Begin with dry infant rice cereal first, mixed as directed, followed by vegetables, fruits, and then meats.
  • Don't use salt or sugar when making homemade infant foods. Canned foods may contain large amounts of salt and sugar and shouldn't be used for baby food. Always wash and peel fruits and vegetables and remove seeds or pits. Take special care with fruits and vegetables that come into contact with the ground. They may contain botulism spores that cause food poisoning.
  • Infant cereals with iron should be given to your infant until your infant is age 18 months.
  • Cow's milk shouldn't be added to the diet until your infant is age 1. Cow's milk doesn't provide the proper nutrients for your baby.
  • The AAP recommends not giving fruit juices to infants younger than age 6 months. Only pasteurized, 100% fruit juices (without added sugar) may be given to older infants and children, and should be limited to 4 ounces a day. Dilute the juice with water and offer it in a cup with a meal.
  • Feed all food with a spoon. Your baby needs to learn to eat from a spoon. Don't use an infant feeder. Only formula and water should go into the bottle.
  • Avoid honey in any form for your child's first year, as it can cause infant botulism.
  • Don't put your baby in bed with a bottle propped in his or her mouth. Propping a bottle has been linked to an increased risk of ear infections. Once your baby's teeth are present, propping the bottle can also cause tooth decay. There is also a risk of choking.
  • Help your baby to give up the bottle by his or her first birthday.
  • Avoid the "clean plate syndrome." Forcing your child to eat all the food on his or her plate even when he or she isn't hungry isn't a good habit. It teaches your child to eat just because the food is there, not because he or she is hungry. Expect a smaller and pickier appetite as the baby's growth rate slows around age 1.
  • Infants and young children shouldn't eat hot dogs, nuts, seeds, round candies, popcorn, hard, raw fruits and vegetables, grapes, or peanut butter. These foods aren't safe and may cause your child to choke. Many health care providers suggest these foods be saved until after your child is age 3 or 4. Always watch a young child while he or she is eating. Insist that the child sit down to eat or drink.
  • Healthy infants usually require little or no extra water, except in very hot weather. When solid food is first fed to your baby, extra water is often needed.
  • Don't limit your baby's food choices to the ones you like. Offering a wide variety of foods early will pave the way for good eating habits later.
  • Fat and cholesterol shouldn't be restricted in the diets of very young children, unless advised by your child's health care provider. Children need calories, fat, and cholesterol for the development of their brains and nervous systems, and for general growth.

Feeding guide for the first year (4 to 8 months)

Item

4 to 6 months

7 months

8 months

Breastfeeding or formula

4 to 6 feedings per day or 28 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

Dry infant cereal with iron

3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

5 to 8 tbs. single grain cereal mixed with formula

Fruits

1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

Vegetables

1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., strained, mashed, soft/2 times per day

Meats and protein foods

 

1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

Juices, vitamin C fortified

 

4 oz. from a cup

4 oz. from a cup

Snacks

 

Arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers

Arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt

Development

Make first cereal feedings very soupy and thicken slowly.

Start finger foods and cup.

Formula intake decreases; solid foods in diet increase.

Feeding guide for the first year (9 to 12 months)

Item

9 months

10 to 12 months

Breastfeeding or formula

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 4 feedings per day or 24 to 30 ounces per day

Dry infant cereal with iron

5 to 8tbs. any variety mixed with formula

5 to 8 tbs. any variety mixed with formula per day

Fruits

2 to 4 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

2 to 4 tbs., mashed or strained, cooked/2 times per day

Vegetables

2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

Meats and protein foods

2 to 3 tbs. of tender, chopped/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., finely chopped, table meats, fish without bones, mild cheese/2 times per day

Juices, vitamin C fortified

4 oz. from a cup

4 oz. from a cup

Starches

 

1/4-1/2 cup mashed potatoes, macaroni, spaghetti, bread/2 times per day

Snacks

Arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans

Arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans, cottage cheese, ice cream, pudding, dry cereal

Development

Eating more table foods. Make sure diet has good variety.

Baby may change to table food. Baby will feed himself or herself and use a spoon and cup.

5 people found this helpful

My daughter 2 months 4 days old. She born 2 day before 36 week. Her birth weight was 2.5 kg and now 3.1 kg at 2nd March. She have cough and chest digestion. What should we need to do to cures her.

MBBS
General Physician, Jalgaon
My daughter 2 months 4 days old. She born 2 day before 36 week. Her birth weight was 2.5 kg and now 3.1 kg at 2nd Mar...
Please Give her Sinarest oral drops 7 drops three times a day Zifi drops 10 drops twice a day Re Consult me on Lybrate after 3 days.

Hello all Just wanted to know I have a friend 28 years who has 2 babies 4 years & 2 months old both are born by cesarian. Can you please let me know she is planning to have a child again till how many months she needs to wait (last baby boy she had in feb )?also please let us know how many babies she can have without any complications or any worries or any discharge if it happens .(normal or cesarian) as she is planning to have 4 childrens. Thank you in advance.

MBBS, MD - Paediatrics
Pediatrician, Mumbai
Hello all
Just wanted to know I have a friend 28 years who has 2 babies 4 years & 2 months old both are born by cesar...
It's her individual choice but I don't feel there is any logic in having 4 kids in current scenario where inflation is increasing and country is having problematic population growth chart which compromises the quality of life we can provide to our future generation. Coming to your question atleast 2-3 years gap is needed in between two children and if there is history of two ceaserian section, it becomes increasingly complicated further number of deliveries. On a lighter note, she can fulfill her wish to have 4 kids by adopting further 2 kids, to stay in good health by avoiding further deliveries and doing social service.

Delivered baby on 1st. Flat nipples. Baby not latching on. Using nipple shield. Is it ok to use nipple. Shield.

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health (DCH), DNB (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Bangalore
Delivered baby on 1st. Flat nipples. Baby not latching on. Using nipple shield. Is it ok to use nipple. Shield.
Hi welcome to lybrate first of all. Congratulations on the birth of your baby! flat nipples is a common problem. Simple technique is to use a nipple retractor or a nipple puller that's available in medical shops or in mom n kids store. Every time before breastfeeding your baby if you use that retractor, gradually the nipples ll be normal enough for the baby to latch on easily.
1 person found this helpful
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