Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Book
Call

Dr. Shashank Joshi

Neurologist, Mumbai

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Shashank Joshi Neurologist, Mumbai
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services

Personal Statement

I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. Shashank Joshi
Dr. Shashank Joshi is a renowned Neurologist in Tardeo, Mumbai. He is currently associated with Bhatia Hospital in Tardeo, Mumbai. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Shashank Joshi on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Neurologists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Neurologists with more than 37 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Neurologists online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Shashank Joshi

Bhatia Hospital

Grant Road West Station, Tardeo Road. Landmark: Near Union Bank & Near Swati Restaurant, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Shashank Joshi

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

What is magna resonance treatment in epilepsy, how does it work, clinics in Delhi having this facility.

MD - Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Vadodara
I cannot elaborate this treatment but I can suggest you an alternative... You may take homoeopathic treatment.. as it is fully capable of curing it .. without any side effect...
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Whenever I go for sleep my right side of the nose is getting blocked but there is no runny nose. And I also have a headache in different parts of the head (not one sided) like above the ears in both side and sometime I also feel pain below the eyebrow. Some says it is migraine and some says it is due to sinus. What is it?

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Hyderabad
Whenever I go for sleep my right side of the nose is getting blocked but there is no runny nose. And I also have a he...
Homoeopathy has good treatment for your problem, without causing adverse effects. Take homoeopathic medicine tuecreum 30 daily in the morning and in the evening and give feedback after 6 days.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 40 years old and I am suffering from migraine problem for last 20 years. Is there an treatment of migraine available.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Migraine cannot be cured. Avoid triggers. If certain foods or odors seem to have triggered your migraines in the past, avoid them. Reduce your caffeine and alcohol intake and avoid tobacco. In general, establish a daily routine with regular sleep patterns and regular meals. In addition, try to control stress. Exercise regularly. Regular aerobic exercise reduces tension and can help prevent migraines. If your doctor agrees, choose any aerobic exercise you enjoy, including walking, swimming and cycling. Warm up slowly, however, because sudden, intense exercise can cause headaches. Obesity is also thought to be a factor in migraine headaches, and regular exercise can help you maintain a healthy weight or lose weight.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 18 and suddenly my small finger in my left hand has gone numb for about half an hour now, its a strange feeling. I have high blood sugar as well.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
You need to follow diabetic status. Keep in constant touch. With blood sugar levels, fasting and 2 hour after diet. Ask privately
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Just to give you a brief background, my father is 72 years old and a diabetic and has Hepatitis C and previously suffered a Diabetic stroke 2 years and had resultant some brain damage from which he made an almost full recovery. He was hospitalized then for a about 2 months and he could recollect all before and after the hospital stay. Recently it was identified that he has some blood clots in his brain and a clot removal surgery was recommended by the local doctors who referred us to another hospital in a another city. The neurosurgeons there have advised that as it currently stands the surgery poses a high risk of post surgery hemorrhage and to compound the problem, he is now highly anaemic. The doctors have advised that he undertakes treatment with clot dissolving medication for a few weeks and then check response to before we go in for surgery due to the risk factors. My father is experiencing intermittent loss of coordination and feeling numb on one side arm and leg which lasts for sometime and then he normalizes. Please could you kindly advise what our next course of action should be. We would highly value your thoughts on this and recommendations. An urgently reply would be greatly appreciated.

BHMS
Homeopath,
Just to give you a brief background, my father is 72 years old and a diabetic and has Hepatitis C and previously suff...
Dear lybrate-user, the clot which is present in your father's brain is responsible for the sudden numbness & loss of co-ordination of one side. Due to clot the blood supply to a certain part of brain is being ceased as a result the numbness is occuring. However, this ceasation of blood flow does not last for a long time & the blood flow agains starts within a short period. As a result your father normalizes after some time. Along with the medicines which your father are taking you can also give him homoeopathic mother tincture gingko bilova q, 30 drops, thrice daily, after meals, in a cup of water.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am feeling electrical sensation in my right hand Thumb for which it is difficult to move my thumb in any direction. Please advise me in this regard. Thanks.

MD- Ayurveda
Ayurveda, Guwahati
I am feeling electrical sensation in my right hand Thumb for which it is difficult to move my thumb in any direction....
Dear -it may be due to calcium deficiency at your age -or peripheral neuropathy - if you are a diabetic then due to poly neuropathy so I would recommend you to start taking the following medicines 1. Cap giloy- 2 cap twice daily 2. Praval pisti - 125 mg twice with luke warm water 3 chandan bala lakshadi oil for local application.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have long lasting health problem from 3 years, symptoms are joint inflammation, stiffness,numbness, pain and RA factor is positive also ESR is high so please give me best treatment.

B.A.M.S
Ayurveda, Mandsaur
I have long lasting health problem from 3 years, symptoms are joint inflammation, stiffness,numbness, pain and RA fac...
You are suffering from Rheumatoid arthritis ,which can be suppressed by medicines to be taken for long time. Better to consult some good physician. In Ayurvedic drugs, you can start vat kulantak ras. Take castor oil 1tsf in morning ,if it suits you. You can also take cap Indica SR once a day after meal.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 63 years old man. and suffering from parkinson I am very much disturb with cramping in the legs. Can it be cure?

BHARAT JYOTI, MRACGP, INCEPTOR, MD-PhD, MD - Psychiatry, FIPS, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE), DPM, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Bangalore
Pain is the most common reason people in the United States visit their doctors each year. Although pain is highly subjective and difficult to describe, a working definition is ?an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential physical damage.? Its components are physical, cognitive, behavioral, emotional and perceptual. Among people who have Parkinson?s disease (PD), pain is a major complaint. In fact, up to 85 percent of people with Parkinson?s report pain as a troubling symptom. Some of these people experience pain as an early symptom of Parkinson?s, before their disease has even been diagnosed. Yet, pain in Parkinson?s disease often remains undiagnosed and untreated. Thus, it is important to understand that pain can be part of the Parkinson?s experience and to learn ways to manage it. Causes of Pain in Parkinson?s Pain researchers use a classification system that is based on the separation of tissue pain receptors from the nerves that transmit pain signals. Pain can be classified as nociceptive, which relates to tissue damage, implicating the pain receptors in the skin, bones or surrounding tissues; as neuropathic, indicating pain arising in nerves; or as a mixed pain syndrome involving both nociceptive and neuropathic pain. In Parkinson?s, most pain experiences seem to result from tissue that is injured or has the potential to be damaged: causes include persistent tremor, muscle rigidity, dystonia, musculoskeletal injury (i.e., sprains, bruises, bone fractures resulting from a fall etc.), burns and inflammation. The pain is typically well-localized to the affected body part; it may fluctuate with the medication dosing. Pain caused by dystonia can be diagnosed when there is visible twisting, cramping or posturing of the painful body part. The most common areas of the body where people with Parkinson?s experience pain are the neck, upper back and extremities. In Parkinson?s, neuropathic pain is less common than nociceptive pain, and includes a number of conditions not directly related to PD, such as shingles, cancer pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, and peripheral neuropathy. The pain may present as burning, numbness and tingling, sharp sensations, or electric shock qualities. Pain due to nerve or root disease is most commonly caused by akathisia, an extreme inner restlessness. Parkinson?s specialists gain insight from the perspective of the pain specialist, and often select treatments based on the nociceptive versus neuropathic classification. In practical terms, it often proves helpful to conceptualize the experience of pain in Parkinson?s as relating to one or more of the following five categories: pain from the muscles or skeleton, pain from nerves or spinal roots, pain related to sustained twisting or writhing, discomfort from akathisia and pain caused directly by changes in chemicals in the brain due to Parkinson?s. The Impact of Pain It is important to address pain because it may interfere with day-to-day activities, mood, sleep and overall enjoyment of life. Specific problems resulting from chronic pain may include sleep disturbance, malnutrition, social withdrawal, physical and functional decline, depression, anxiety and impaired cognition. Pain also accounts for increased overall health care costs. A person?s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. Scientists have shown that depression, which affects approximately 40 percent of individuals diagnosed with Parkinson?s, plays an important role in the way people perceive pain. Similarly, tension and muscle stress caused by anxiety can compound pain. Cognitive processes ? how a person views pain and how he or she pays attention to it ? also influence the level of pain a person feels. A person who pays more attention to his or her pain and reacts to pain with a high level of stress will likely experience more pain than someone who tries to ignore the pain and considers it irrelevant to his or her daily life. Feeling helpless to control pain ? that is, believing that pain is uncontrollable or that there are no treatment options or health professionals available to assist in managing pain ? can also make pain seem worse. Fortunately, many options exist for treating pain. How can you find which are right for you? The first step is to talk to your doctor who can assess your pain and then help to build a pain management plan. Assessing and Managing Pain Your doctor can assess pain through a clinical interview and neurological examination, sometimes performed in both the unmedicated state and when the Parkinson?s medications are working fully. Your doctor may also ask you to describe the characteristics of your pain. For example, when do you feel pain? Where in the body is your pain? Does the pain feel hot or cold, stabbing or burning? You also may be asked to report how pain impacts your daily activities ? for example, walking or sleeping. The more information you can provide about your pain, the better your doctor will be able to diagnose and treat it. Management options for pain in Parkinson?s include both the pharmacological (i.e., medications) and the non-pharmacological. A combination of both may offer the best pain control, and an interdisciplinary model of care can lead to optimal results for pain management. Some treatment options include: medications physical therapy massage botulin toxin injections nutrition management exercise acupuncture/acupressure psychotherapy (emphasis on pain management) stretching Because of the relationship between dopamine and pain, dopaminergic medications such as levodopa can affect a person?s perception of pain. People with Parkinson?s who are in the ?on? levodopa state, when the medication is at peak effectiveness, report less pain than those in the ?off? state. Pain due to rigidity or dystonia can be relieved by dopamine drugs, but on the other hand, may cause dyskinesias. Therefore, effective management of levodopa medication for people with Parkinson?s may help to reduce pain. Because certain thought processes and behaviors can alleviate or worsen pain, some people find psychotherapy helpful for managing their pain. Techniques such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (helping to control the psychological response to pain; teaching diaphragmatic breathing, visual imagery exercises, relaxation techniques, etc.), and biofeedback may help ease pain, but are unlikely to eliminate it completely. A physical therapist can help you select and modify appropriate exercise routines. Of course, you should avoid activities or exercises that make your pain worse.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi I have a fatty tissue on my scalp first I had one now there two lumps are they tumors they are not paining please give your best suggestions thanks

MPTh/MPT
Physiotherapist,
They are not tumor. It might be clumps(either extra growth or calcification). Kindly consult homeopathic doctor.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed

Near By Doctors

87%
(82 ratings)

Dr. Siddharth Kharkar

MBBS, MHS, MD - Neurology (USA), Fellowship In Epilepsy, Clinical Attachment In Movement Disorders
Neurologist
Wockhardt Hospital, 
at clinic
Book Appointment