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Triolen 25Mg Tablet Health Feed

Hi,I am 45 yr male having pain in both toe nails. Both nails are a bit curve shape & thick to clip. Earlier it where normal,but from past few years it has bent from one side & have became thick. It pains when pressed and also while clipping. Also painful while wearing certain shoes.please suggest some remedy. Thanks

Dr. K Sailaja 88% (25 ratings)
MBBS
General Physician, Hyderabad
Arnica 200. hypercum30 rhustox 30 each 4pills daily twice with 20minutes gap from food and drink.
2 people found this helpful
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What are the factors for the tumor of male genital? Please tell me the answer for this question sir.

Dr. Aparna Kulkarni 90% (268 ratings)
MD - Ayurveda, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Bangalore
What are the factors for the tumor of male genital? Please tell me the answer for this question sir.
A risk factor is anything that increases a man’s chance of developing cancer, HPV infection Smoking Age Phimosis Psoriosis treatment with psoralen combined with ultraviolet (UV) light have a higher risk of developing penile cancer.
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Fragrant Ageing

MBBS, MS - General Surgery
General Surgeon, Kota
Fragrant Ageing

Stay away from perfumed or flavoured suntan lotions which smell of coconut oil or orange if you want your skin to stay young. These lotions contain psoralen, which speeds up the ageing process. Rather use a fake-tan lotion. Avoid sun beds, which are as bad as the sun itself.

Hi Sir, I would like to know is there risk of skin cancer due to NB UVP phototherapy for vitiligo? Is narrow banded UV safe?

Dr. Sajeev Kumar 92% (29080 ratings)
C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
Narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) phototherapy is a widely used treatment. Psoralen-UVA photochemotherapy (PUVA) increases skin cancer risk and some animal studies have raised the possibility of an increased risk with NB-UVB. The risk of skin cancer in humans following treatment with NB-UVB is unknown.
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My child leg burned with boiled water in age of 15 month now his age is 21 month .skin get darker and and also whiteness in some area. How to get skin as normal skin.

Dr. Sujata Dora 92% (207 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Dermatology , Venereology & Leprosy
Dermatologist, Sambalpur
My child leg burned with boiled water in age of 15 month now his age is 21 month .skin get darker and and also whiten...
It is Post burn hypo and hyper pigmentation.Hypopigmentation (white) is due to destruction of melanocytes of epidermis responsible for colour of the skin and darkness is due to post inflammatory hyperpigmentation. For dark skin use CLEARZPLUS (DR. REDDY'S product)/HAPPYGLOW (ACUMENTIS product)/KOJIVIT PLUS (AJANTA product) LA BD for 4-5 months. It takes some time. For white areas can try PUVASOL ie OCTAMOP lotion)(8 Methoxy Psoralen)(1: 40 dilution ie 1 drop of Octamop diluted in 40 drops of water )dilution in water .Apply this solution over only the white area with ear bud then after 15-30 minutes of application SUN EXPOSURE for 3-5 minute in morning initially for a week then increase weekly by 5 minutes to max. 15 mnt if no redness /blistering of the area. BE CAUTIOUS DURING ITS USE AS IT CAN CAUSE BLISTER FORMATION IF USED IN WRONG CONCENTRATION. FIRST TREAT FOR THE DARK AREA I WOULD SUGGEST. SMTIMES WITH AGE THERE MIGHT OCCUR SOME PIGMENTATION .U CAN TREAT LATER ON.
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Hello doc, I am 21 years old and I have leukoderma problem since 10 years I have tried all type of medications allopathic, homeopathic, ayurvedic, laser treatment. Bt all these proved useless now its getting worse for me to handle this problem please suggest something so that I can get rid of it soon.

Dr. Sandesh Gupta 92% (5143 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma in Venerology & Dermatology (DVD)
Dermatologist, Delhi
Hii lybrate-user .there is no need to get disheartened. Leukoderma is treatable and majourity of patients have gained good results through proper treatment. Four options are currently available for the treatment of vitiligo: sunscreens; cover-up; restoration of normal skin color; and bleaching of normal skin with topical creams to remove normal skin pigment to make an even color. Sunscreens The two goals of sunscreen treatments are: to protect unpigmented involved skin from sunburn reaction and to limit the tanning of normal pigmented skin. The sun protection factor (SPF) of sunscreens should be no less than SPF 30, as this grade blocks not only erythema, but also the affects of sunlight on the DNA of the skin cells. Cover-up The goal of cover-up with dyes or make-up is to hide the white macules so that the vitiligo is less visible. Self-tanning lotions and camouflage are quite helpful for some patients. Restoring Normal Skin Color Restoration of normal skin color can take the form of spot treatments or whole body treatment. Spot Treatment: Topical Corticosteroid Creams Initial treatment with certain topical corticosteroid creams is practical, simple, and safe. If there is no response in 2 months, it is unlikely to be effective. Physician monitoring every 2 months for signs of early steroid atrophy (thinning of the skin) is required. Spot Treatment: Skin Grafting Skin grafting involves transplanting the patient's normal skin to vitiligo affected areas, may be a useful technique for refractory segmental vitiligo macules. PUVA may be required following the procedure to unify the color between the graft sites. Whole Body Treatment: PUVA Photochemotherapy (Oral Psoralens + UVA Irradiation) For more widespread vitiligo, treatment with oral psoralen + UVA (PUVA) is practical. This may be done with sunlight and trimethylpsoralen (Trisoralen) or with artificial UVA (in the doctor's office or at an approved phototherapy facility) and Trisoralen or Oxsoralen-Ultra. PUVA is up to 85% effective in over 70% of patients with vitiligo of the head, neck, upper arms, legs, and trunk. Maintenance treatments are required.
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Seborrheic dermatitis: Who gets and causes, Faqs

Dr. Venu Kumari 89% (1850 ratings)
MD - Skin,VD & Lepxsy
Dermatologist, Hyderabad
Seborrheic dermatitis: Who gets and causes, Faqs


This is a very common skin disease that causes a rash. When this rash appears, it often looks like the one pictured above. The skin tends to have a:

Reddish color.
Swollen and greasy appearance.
White or yellowish crusty scale on the surface.



One or more of these rashes can appear on the body. Sometimes, the affected skin itches.

Who gets and causes What causes seborrheic dermatitis?

Researchers are still studying what causes this common skin disease. From what they have learned, it appears that the cause is complex. Many factors seem to work together to cause seborrheic dermatitis. These factors may include the yeast that normally lives on our skin, our genes, living in a cold and dry climate, stress, and a person’s overall health.

By studying seborrheic dermatitis, researchers have learned the following:

It is not caused by poor personal hygiene.
It is not an allergy.
It does not harm the body.


Who gets seborrheic dermatitis?

People of all colors and ages get seborrheic dermatitis. You have a higher risk if any of the following apply to you.
Age

People in these two age groups are most susceptible:

Infants 3 months of age and younger.
Adults between 30 and 60 years of age.


Medical conditions

Your risk increases if you have any of these medical conditions:

HIV (About 85 percent of people infected with HIV develop seborrheic dermatitis).
Acne, rosacea, or psoriasis.
Parkinson’s disease.
Epilepsy.
Stroke or heart attack (recovering from).
Alcoholism.
Depression.
Eating disorder.


Medical treatments

If you are taking any of the following medicines, your risk for seborrheic dermatitis increases:

Interferon.
Lithium.
Psoralen.

References:
Habif TP, Campbell JL, et al. “Seborrheic dermatitis.” In: Dermatology DDxDeck.China, Mosby Elsevier: 2006, p. 40.
Plewig G Jansen T. “Seborrheic Dermatitis.” In: Wolff K, Goldsmith LA, Katz SI, et al. editors. Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine, 7th ed. United States of America, McGraw Hill Medical; 2008. p.219-25.
3 people found this helpful

Vitiligo - Know How To Treat It!

Dr. Swarup Kumar Ghosh 90% (82 ratings)
MD - Bio-Chemistry, MF Homeo (London), DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery), BHMS
Homeopath, Kolkata
Vitiligo - Know How To Treat It!

Vitiligo is a long-term skin condition characterized by patches of the skin losing their pigment. The patches of skin affected become white and usually have sharp margins. The hair from the skin may also become white. The inside of the mouth and nose may also be involved. Typically both sides of the body are affected. often the patches begin on areas of skin that are exposed to the sun. It is more noticeable in people with dark skin. Vitiligo may result in psychological stress and those affected may be stigmatized. 
The exact cause of vitiligo is unknown. It is believed to be due to genetic susceptibility that is triggered by an environmental factor such that an autoimmune disease occurs. This results in the destruction of skin pigment cells. Risk factors include a family history of the condition or other autoimmune diseases, such as
Hyperthyroidism, alopecia areata, and pernicious anemia. It is not contagious. Vitiligo is classified into two main types: segmental and non-segmental. Most cases are non-segmental, meaning they affect both sides; and in these cases, the affected area of the skin typically expands with time. About 10% of cases are segmental, meaning they mostly involve one side of the body; and in these cases, the affected area of the skin typically does not expand with time. Diagnosis can be confirmed by tissue biopsy.
There is no known cure for vitiligo. For those with light skin, sunscreen and makeup are all that is typically recommended. Other treatment options may include
Steroid creams or phototherapy to darken the light patches. Alternatively, efforts to lighten the unaffected skin, such as with hydroquinone, may be tried. A number of surgical options are available for those who do not improve with other measures. A combination of treatments generally has better outcomes. Counselling to provide emotional support may be useful.
Globally about 1% of people are affected by vitiligo. Some populations have rates as high as 2–3%. Males and females are equally affected. About half show the disorder before age 20 and most develop it before age 40. Vitiligo has been described since ancient history. 
 

Signs and symptoms-

  • Vitiligo on lighter skin
  • Vitiligo on darker skin
  • The only sign of vitiligo is the presence of pale patchy areas of depigmented skin which tend to occur on the extremities. The patches are initially small, but often grow and change shape. When skin lesions occur, they are most prominent on the face, hands and wrists.
  •  The loss of skin pigmentation is particularly noticeable around body orifices, such as the mouth, eyes, nostrils,
  • Genitalia and umbilicus. Some lesions have increased skin pigment around the edges. Those affected by vitiligo who are stigmatized for their condition may experience depression and similar mood disorders.

Causes-

  • Although multiple hypotheses have been suggested as potential triggers that cause vitiligo, studies strongly imply that changes in the immune system are responsible for the condition. Vitiligo has been proposed to be a multifactorial disease with genetic susceptibility and environmental factors both thought to play a role.
  • The tyr gene encodes the protein tyrosinase, which is not a component of the immune system, but is an enzyme of the melanocyte that catalyzes melanin biosynthesis, and a major autoantigen in generalized vitiligo.  The nih states that sunburns can cause the disease but there is not good evidence to support this. 
  • Preliminary evidence suggests a possible association with eating gluten.

Immune-

  • Variations in genes that are part of the immune system or part of melanocytes have both been associated with vitiligo. It is also thought to be caused by the immune system attacking and destroying the melanocytes of the skin. A genomewide association study found approximately 36 independent susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo. 
  • Autoimmune associations
  • Vitiligo is sometimes associated with autoimmune and
  • Inflammatory diseases such as hashimoto's thyroiditis,
  • Scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, psoriasis, addison's disease, pernicious anemia,
  • Alopecia areata, systemic lupus erythematosus, and celiac disease.
  • Among the inflammatory products of nalp1 are caspase 1 and caspase 7, which activate the inflammatory cytokine
  • Interleukin-1β. Interleukin-1β and interleukin-18 are expressed at high levels in patients with vitiligo. In one of the mutations, the amino acid leucine in the nalp1 protein was replaced by histidine (leu155->His). The original protein and sequence is highly conserved in evolution, and is found in humans, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, and the bush baby. Addison's disease (typically an autoimmune destruction of the adrenal glands) may also be seen in individuals with vitiligo. 

Diagnosis-

  • Uv photograph of a hand with vitiligo
  • Uv photograph of a foot with vitiligo
  • An ultraviolet light can be used in the early phase of this disease for identification and to determine the effectiveness of treatment. Skin with vitiligo, when exposed to a blacklight, will glow blue. In contrast, healthy skin will have no reaction.

Classification
Classification attempts to quantify vitiligo have been analyzed as being somewhat inconsistent, while recent consensus have agreed to a system of segmental vitiligo (sv) and non-segmental vitiligo (nsv). Nsv is the most common type of vitiligo.
Non-segmental

  • Eyelid vitiligo

In non-segmental vitiligo (nsv), there is usually some form of symmetry in the location of the patches of depigmentation. New patches also appear over time and can be generalized over large portions of the body or localized to a particular area. Extreme cases of vitiligo, to the extent that little pigmented skin remains, are referred to as vitiligo universalis. Nsv can come about at any age (unlike segmental vitiligo, which is far more prevalent in teenage years). 
Classes of non-segmental vitiligo include the following:

  • Generalized vitiligo: the most common pattern, wide and randomly distributed areas of depigmentation 
  • Universal vitiligo: depigmentation encompasses most of the body
  • Focal vitiligo: one or a few scattered macules in one area, most common in children 
  • Acrofacial vitiligo: fingers and periorificial areas 
  • Mucosal vitiligo: depigmentation of only the mucous membranes

Segmental-
Segmental vitiligo (sv) differs in appearance, cause, and frequency of associated illnesses. Its treatment is different from that of nsv. It tends to affect areas of skin that are associated with dorsal roots from the spinal cord and is most often unilateral. It is much more stable/static in course and its association with autoimmune diseases appears to be weaker than that of generalized vitiligo. SV does not improve with topical therapies or uv light, however surgical treatments such as cellular grafting can be effective. 
Differential diagnosis
Chemical leukoderma is a similar condition due to multiple exposures to chemicals. Vitiligo however is a risk factor. Triggers may include inflammatory skin conditions, burns, intralesional steroid injections and abrasions. 
Other conditions with similar symptoms include the following:

  • Pityriasis alba
  • Tuberculoid leprosy
  • Postinflammatory hypopigmentation
  • Tinea versicolor 
  • Albinism
  • Piebaldism
  • Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis 
  • Progressive macular hypomelanosis
  • Primary adrenal insufficiency

Treatment
There is no cure for vitiligo but several treatment options are available. The best evidence is for applied steroids and the combination of ultraviolet light in combination with creams. Due to the higher risks of skin cancer, the united kingdom's national health service suggests phototherapy only be used if primary treatments are ineffective. Lesions located on the hands, feet, and joints are the most difficult to repigment; those on the face are easiest to return to the natural skin color as the skin is thinner in nature.

  • Immune mediators- Topical preparations of immune suppressing medications including glucocorticoids (such as 0.05% clobetasol or 0.10% betamethasone) and calcineurin inhibitors (such as Tacrolimus or pimecrolimus) are considered to be first-line vitiligo treatments. 
  • Phototherapy- Phototherapy is considered a second-line treatment for vitiligo. Exposing the skin to light from uvb lamps is the most common treatment for vitiligo. The treatments can be done at home with an uvb lamp or in a clinic. The exposure time is managed so that the skin does not suffer overexposure. Treatment can take a few weeks if the spots are on the neck and face and if they existed not more than 3 years. If the spots are on the hands and legs and have been there more than 3 years, it can take a few months. Phototherapy sessions are done 2–3 times a week. Spots on a large area of the body may require full body treatment in a clinic or hospital. Uvb broadband and narrowband lamps can be used, But narrowband ultraviolet picked around 311 nm is the choice. It has been constitutively reported that a combination of uvb phototherapy with other topical treatments improves re-pigmentation. However, some vitiligo patients may not see any changes to skin or re-pigmentation occurring. A serious potential side effect involves the risk of developing skin cancer, the same risk as an over-exposure to natural sunlight.Ultraviolet light (uva) treatments are normally carried out in a hospital clinic. Psoralen and ultraviolet a light (puva) treatment involves taking a drug that increases the skin's sensitivity to ultraviolet light, then exposing the skin to high doses of uva light. Treatment is required twice a week for 6–12 months or longer. Because of the high doses of uva and psoralen, puva may cause side effects such as sunburn-type reactions or skin freckling. Narrowband ultraviolet b (nbuvb) phototherapy lacks the side-effects caused by psoralens and is as effective as puva as with puva, treatment is carried out twice weekly in a clinic or every day at home, and there is no need to use psoralen.
  • Skin camouflage- In mild cases, vitiligo patches can be hidden with makeup or other cosmetic camouflage solutions. If the affected person is pale-skinned, the patches can be made less visible by avoiding tanning of unaffected skin. 
  • De-pigmenting- In cases of extensive vitiligo the option to de-pigment the unaffected skin with topical drugs like monobenzone, Mequinol, or hydroquinone may be considered to render the skin an even colour. The removal of all the skin pigment with monobenzone is permanent and vigorous. Sun-safety must be adhered to for life to avoid severe Sunburn and melanomas. Depigmentation takes about a year to complete.

Diet For Vitiligo!

Dr. Shailender Dhawan 93% (3568 ratings)
Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine & Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Faridabad
Diet For Vitiligo!

Vitiligo is a disease that causes the loss of skin shading and colour in patches. The degree and rate of colour loss from vitiligo cannot be determined. It can influence any part of the skin on your body. It might also influence one’s hair, inside of the mouth and even the eyes.

Ordinarily, the shade of one’s hair, skin and eyes is measured by melanin. Vitiligo happens when the cells that create melanin quit working or die. Vitiligo influences individuals of all skin types; however, it might be more common in individuals with a darker skin. The condition is not contagious or life threatening.

Numerous medicines may be used to restore the skin shading or level out the skin tone. A few medicines might have some serious side effects on some people. So your specialist may propose that you first try to improve your skin by applying self-tanning products or make-up. Here is the diet for Vitiligo Treatment:

It has been confirmed through research that a large number of vitiligo cases are a result of deficiency of folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin 312, zinc, and copper. Vitiligo can, therefore, also be treated through some easy alterations in your diet. Try to include celery in your diet. Celery is filled with psoralen, which increases the skin’s ability of reacting naturally to sunlight.

Enrich your diet with antioxidants rich foods like:

Fill your diet with foods carrying rich content of folic acid. These foods include:

  • green leafy vegetables
  • broccoli
  • asparagus
  • peas
  • beans
  • nuts and seeds
  • pumpkin
  • cauliflower
  • avocado
  • citrus fruits (Vitamin C)
  • celery
  • carrots
  • beets
  • Avoid taking dairy products, fat foods, red meat, smoking and alcohol. Sun exposure, instead of artificial UV Rays, is more helpful in gaining new pigmentation for vitiligo patients.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3429 people found this helpful

In hand fingers, lips his skin colour changed as white. Its visible as differ from rest of the skin. She get treatment nearly 4 years. But, improvement was zero. Some are telling it is some deficiency problem. Actually what it is? To change the colour as her normal skin colour, what to do?

Dr. Satish Kumar Gupta 92% (728 ratings)
MD, MBBS
General Physician, Noida
In hand fingers, lips his skin colour changed as white. Its visible as differ from rest of the skin. She get treatmen...
It is vitiligo or leukoderma. Vitiligo is a skin condition that causes the skin to lose its color. As the skin pigment disappears, people see white (or lighter-colored) patches. Unlike Peecher, most people see changes to their skin color, but they don’t feel anything. It is caused by auto-immune damage of melanocytes in skin in patchy distribution. Melanocytes make the pigment of skin known as melanin. Usually it is slowly progressive. Vitiligo is not contagious. It is not life-threatening. But, vitiligo can be life-altering. Some people develop low self-esteem. They may no longer want to hang out with friends or develop serious depression. Most people have vitiligo for life, so it’s important to develop coping strategies. Steroids may be tried to arrest it's progression but usually have not become successful in most of cases. Sunlight stimulates formation of melanin by remaining melanocytes but may also damage the skin of white patches as melanin pigment which absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiaton from reaching deep layers of skin is absent in these patches. You may need to apply sunscreens to white patches while going out in sun to protect damage to deep layers of skin at patches Treatment of Vitiligo: The type of treatment that is best for you will depend on your preference, overall health, age and where the vitiligo appears on your body. Some people choose not to treat vitiligo as it is more of a cosmetic problem than a medical problem. 1. No medical treatment (use cosmetics to add lost color): Cosmetic options include makeup, a self-tanner and skin dye. Offers safe way to make vitiligo less noticeable. Often recommended for children because it avoids possible side effects from medicine. Drawbacks: Must be repeatedly applied, can be time-consuming, takes practice to get natural- looking result. 2. Medicine applied to the skin: Several different topical (applied to the skin) medicines can repigment the skin. Prescribed for small areas. The most commonly prescribed medicine is a potent or super-potent topical corticosteroid. About half, 45 percent, of patients regain at least some skin color after 4 to 6 months. A topical corticosteroid may be combined with another medicine to improve results. Topical medicine works best in people with darkly pigmented skin. Topical medicines are most effective on certain areas of the body, such as the face. They are least effective on the hands and feet. Not all topical medicines should be used on the face. Drawbacks: These medicines have possible side effects, so patients must be carefully monitored. A possible serious side effect of using of a topical corticosteroid for a year or longer is skin atrophy. This means the skin becomes paper thin, very dry and fragile. 3. Light treatment: Uses light to repigment the skin. Patient may sit in a light box or receive excimer laser treatments. Light box used to treat widespread vitiligo; laser used to treat small area. Works best on the face; least effective on hands and feet. Effective for many patients; about 70 percent see results with excimer laser. Results can disappear. About half, 44 percent, see results disappear within 1 year of stopping treatment. After 4 years, about 86 percent lose some color restored by treatment. May cause patients with darkly pigmented skin to see areas of darker skin after treatment, but treated skin usually matches untreated skin within a few months. Requires a time commitment. Patients need 2 to 3 treatments per week for several weeks. May be combined with another treatment such as topical corticosteroid. 4. PUVA light therapy: Uses UVA light and a medicine called psoralen to restore skin color. Psoralen may be applied to the skin or taken as a pill. Bagchi (a herb also contains psoalens, and may be used. Can treat widespread vitiligo. About 50 percent to 75 percent effective in restoring pigment to the face, trunk, upper arms and upper legs. Not very effective for the hands or feet. Time-consuming, requiring treatment at a hospital or PUVA center twice a week for about 1 year. Psoralen can affect the eyes, so this treatment requires eye exams before starting treatment and after finishing treatment. To help prevent serious side effects, patients need to be carefully monitored. 5. Surgery: May be an option when light therapy and medicines applied to the skin do not work. For adults whose vitiligo has been stable (not changed) for at least 6 months. Not for children. Not for people who scar easily or develop keloids (scars that rise above the skin). Different surgical procedures available. Most involve removing unaffected skin or skin cells and placing where need pigment. Can be effective for 90 percent to 95 percent of patients. Possible side effects include failure to work, cobblestone-like skin and infection. 6. Unconventional treatment: Some vitamins, minerals, amino acids and enzymes have been reported to restore skin color in people who have vitiligo. Most have not been studied, so there is no evidence to support these treatments and no knowledge of possible side effects. Ginkgo biloba, an herb, has been studied in a clinical trial. Results from this trial indicate that the herb may restore skin color and stop vitiligo from worsening. In the ginkgo biloba trial, 10 patients given ginkgo biloba had noticeable or complete return of skin color. Two patients taking the placebo (contains no active ingredient) also had noticeable or complete return of skin color. Because some patients taking the placebo regained their skin color, more study is needed. 7. Depigmentation: This treatment removes the remaining pigment from the skin. Very few patients opt for this treatment. Removing the rest of the pigment leaves a person with completely white skin. It may be an option for an adult who has little pigment left and other treatment has not worked. Removing the remaining pigment can be an effective way to get one skin color. To remove the remaining color requires you to apply a cream once or twice day. This cream gradually removes color from the skin. Depigmentation can take 1 to 4 years. Once treatment is finished, some people see spots of pigment on their skin from being out in the sun. To get rid of these spots, you can use the cream that removed your remaining skin color. Outcome It is not possible to predict how a patient will respond to treatment. It is important to keep in mind that no one treatment works for everyone. Results can vary from one part of the body to another. Combining two or more treatments often gives the best results. Ayurvedic Treatment: Patanjali claims that:- Agnijith, a natural medicine for vitiligo, is scientifically proven for its capability to produce pigmentation in areas lacking color. The medicine is very effective for preventing vitiligo by blocking the loss of pigment cells from the skin. The medicine is also a cream with high anti-microbial properties, which is easily absorbed by the skin and increases blood circulation at the capillary level. Homeopathic Remedies for Vitiligo BOERICKE- SKIN- LEUCODERMA. Ars. Alb. Ars. Sulph.flavum. Bacillinum. Graphites. Merc sol. Nat. Mur. Nit. Acid. Nux vom. Phos. Sep. Sil. Sulph. Thuja. Aurvedic & Homeopathic doctors very enthusiastic claims but lack any controlled clinical trials and in fact their effect on vitiligo occurs very insignificant in most of cases. Actually they are not selling remedies to you but are selling hopes to you in exchange of money for ailments for which there is inadequate treatment in modern medicine (as some call it allopathy in retaliation). In fact truth reveals it self clearly when you go on practicals and medicine is a matter of truth, not a matter of faith as truth would treat your ailments, not the faith but faith is important as well to make you stick to treatment.
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