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Can You Get Enough Calcium Without Dairy?

Can You Get Enough Calcium Without Dairy?

A dairy free diet has many implications. While it is considered a healthy option by many, it also means that you are cutting off a supply of calcium and even some amount of protein. Calcium, as we all know, is the life-giving force for your bones and joints. So how can you get your dose of calcium without dairy products? Here's a quick list!

*   Beans: Get your fill of calcium with the protein and calcium-rich chickpea. Other brown, black and white beans also have plenty of natural calcium sealed in each bean, which can be ingested on a daily basis. Legumes or smaller beans can also be used for your daily calcium fix. You can cook the legumes like an Indian dal and have it with a serving of rice, or make a yummy hummus with plenty of chickpeas and a touch of garlic. Toss beans soaked overnight in a salad bowl to enjoy calcium for lunch too!

*  Fish: Salmon and sardines are known to be excellent and healthy sources of lean protein as well as Omega three fatty acids, which keeps the heart healthy above all else. But did you also know that fish contains plenty of natural calcium which can help your bones and joints too? So, stock up on fish and enjoy as often as you can. Plus, salmon and sardines also give you a good dose of Vitamin D.

*  Dry Fruits: Dry fruits like figs and almonds are packed with calcium among various other nutrients and minerals which makes it ideal for a snack as well. Munch on these to get a constant dose of calcium even when you are on the go, or busy at work.

*  Green vegetables: If you thought green vegetables were only a good source of iron and magnesium, you may have to think again. Green vegetables are filled with essential nutrients including a good amount of calcium, Vitamin A and C. Kale, turnip greens, seaweed and black-eyed peas also make it to the list of calcium-rich greens. 

*  Citrus Fruits: Get plenty of calcium by starting your day with a glass of orange juice, blended to perfection with carrots as well. Use lemons in your salad and eat all the citrus fruits you can get your hands on. These are all excellent sources of calcium. 

*  Sesame Seeds: These seeds are rich in calcium and can also keep cancer at bay when taken regularly.

*  Foxnuts (Makhane): Foxnuts are rich in protein and calcium. Roasted foxnuts are a great snack also.

Ragi - It is a whole grain which is gluten-free and rich in fiber. It greatly helps in weight loss and diabetes. It is packed with calcium, good carbs, amino acids and Vitamin D which are essential for your overall health.

Pack your diet with all the food groups for a balanced diet that will lead to a healthy lifestyle.

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Is cholecalciferol and alfacalcidol are same or different? Which calcium is better-calcium carbonate, calcium citrate maleate or calcium phosphate.

Is cholecalciferol and alfacalcidol are same or different? Which calcium is better-calcium carbonate, calcium citrate...
Calcium is best absorbed in an acidic environment, so calcium citrate is the best absorbed supplemental form of calcium.
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FACTORS AFFECTING CALCIUM ABSORPTION

FACTORS AFFECTING CALCIUM ABSORPTION
Incorporating healthy foods in the diet is not enough. One should understand factors affecting the absorption of nutrients from the food. Some factors are responsible for increased absorption of particular nutrient whereas some decreases its absorption. Calcium is the hardest mineral to get absorbed in the body. 30-80 % of the dietary calcium is not getting absorbed in the adult body.

Factors increasing absorption of calcium:
1 vitamin d: vitamin d works in the digestive tract to absorb calcium into the blood stream from the walls of the duodenum. Vitamin d also helps maintain normal blood calcium level.


2. Parathyroid hormone: it increases calcium transport across the membrane of intestinal cells.


3. Acid environment: hydrochloric acid secreted in the stomach during the process of digestion is required for the absorption of calcium in the duodenum. Calcium supplements could be taken with magnesium at bedtime or between meals due to the acid environment needed in the stomach to assimilate the calcium. Always consult a physician before beginning a new supplement regimen.


4. Milk lactose: it favors absorption in infants. Lactose is acted upon by intestinal microbial flora to form acid which causes lowering of ph which makes calcium more soluble.


5. Amino acids: supplemental calcium is often chelated, or combined with protein molecules called amino acids, to help the body absorb them during digestion. Lysine and arginine increase calcium absorption.


6. Exercise: exercise along with vitamin d intake helps calcium absorption thereby making bones strong.


Factors decreasing absorption of calcium:
1. Oxalic acid& phytic acid: foods that are high in oxalic acid such as spinach, chard and chocolate, reduce calcium absorption. Oxalic acid binds with the calcium to form a salt crystal, calcium oxalate which cannot be absorbed. Phytic acid, which is found in whole-grain foods and high-fibre foods, effects calcium absorption the same way.


2. Phosphorus: too much phosphorus in the diet causes precipitation of calcium in the form of calcium phosphate.


3. Stress: stress can have a negative effect on hcl production in the stomach and on normal digestive behaviour in the body, and can therefore have a negative effect on calcium absorption.


4. Caffeine, drugs like anticoagulants, cortisone and thyroxine reduce calcium absorption.

V lack of exercise and vitamin d deficiency leads to decrease calcium absorption.
37 people found this helpful

FACTORS AFFECTING CALCIUM ABSORPTION

FACTORS AFFECTING CALCIUM ABSORPTION
Incorporating healthy foods in the diet is not enough. One should understand factors affecting the absorption of nutrients from the food. Some factors are responsible for increased absorption of particular nutrient whereas some decreases its absorption. Calcium is the hardest mineral to get absorbed in the body. 30-80 % of the dietary calcium is not getting absorbed in the adult body.

Factors increasing absorption of calcium:
1. Vitamin d: vitamin d works in the digestive tract to absorb calcium into the blood stream from the walls of the duodenum. Vitamin d also helps maintain normal blood calcium level.

2. Parathyroid hormone: it increases calcium transport across the membrane of intestinal cells.

3. Acid environment: hydrochloric acid secreted in the stomach during the process of digestion is required for the absorption of calcium in the duodenum. Calcium supplements could be taken with magnesium at bedtime or between meals due to the acid environment needed in the stomach to assimilate the calcium. Always consult a physician before beginning a new supplement regimen.

4. Milk lactose: it favors absorption in infants. Lactose is acted upon by intestinal microbial flora to form acid which causes lowering of ph which makes calcium more soluble.

5. Amino acids: supplemental calcium is often chelated, or combined with protein molecules called amino acids, to help the body absorb them during digestion. Lysine and arginine increase calcium absorption.

6. Exercise: exercise along with vitamin d intake helps calcium absorption thereby making bones strong.

Factors decreasing absorption of calcium:
1. Oxalic acid& phytic acid: foods that are high in oxalic acid such as spinach, chard and chocolate, reduce calcium absorption. Oxalic acid binds with the calcium to form a salt crystal, calcium oxalate which cannot be absorbed. Phytic acid, which is found in whole-grain foods and high-fibre foods, effects calcium absorption the same way.

2. Phosphorus: too much phosphorus in the diet causes precipitation of calcium in the form of calcium phosphate.

3. Stress: stress can have a negative effect on hcl production in the stomach and on normal digestive behaviour in the body, and can therefore have a negative effect on calcium absorption.

4. Caffeine, drugs like anticoagulants, cortisone and thyroxine reduce calcium absorption.

5. Lack of exercise and vitamin d deficiency leads to decrease calcium absorption.

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!
Lack of calcium causes osteoporosis. True or False? Take this quiz to find out.
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966 people took this quiz

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!
Porous bones is another medical term for osteoporosis. True or False? Take this quiz to find out.
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1847 people took this quiz

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!
Osteoporosis is easily detectable. True or False? Take this quiz to find out.
Start Quiz
1333 people took this quiz

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!
Osteoporosis is easily detectable. True or False? Take this quiz to find out.
Start Quiz
98 people took this quiz

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!

Lack Of Calcium And Its Effect On Your Joints!
Osteoporosis is easily detectable. True or False? Take this quiz to find out.
Start Quiz
1610 people took this quiz

Is Milk Really a Good Source of Calcium?

Is Milk Really a Good Source of Calcium?

Milk is not a simple drink; in fact, it can be called a phenomenon that traces back to thousands of years to time unknown. Even today the milk myth is very much present in our daily lives and you will be surprised to know that back in 2001, the average American kid drank more than 104 quarts of cow milk. But does it really have any good effect on human bones? Researchers say otherwise; milk tends to deplete the calcium content in human bones.

The cause in the myth of milk

The myth of milk has extended itself across the globe on the basis of a misconception that calcium and protein-rich drinks are essential to support bone health at all ages. Here it can be implied that the confusion regarding supposed benefits of milk may have stemmed from the fact that milk is rich in calcium, which is about 300 mg calcium for a cupful of milk.

Did you know that various scientific studies have reported that series of detrimental health issues are directly connected with consumption of milk? The most astonishing fact here is that not only do people hardly absorb the calcium contained in cow’s milk, but it leads to depletion of calcium content in the human bones.  Similar to animal protein, milk would acidify the pH level of the body which leads to a biological correction. You can also take the package for Reducing Joint/Muscle Pains.

Milk causes depletion of calcium content in bones

Calcium is a great acid neutralizer and the largest store of calcium in the body is in the bones. Therefore, the calcium required by the bones to stay strong is contrarily used by the body for neutralizing the acidic effect of the milk. Once the calcium is taken out of the bone, it passes out of the body through urination. So the awful net outcome of consuming milk is a deficiency of calcium within the bones.

In a report published by the nutrition director for the physicians committee for responsible medicine, it is claimed that the countries with the highest level of osteoporosis are those where milk consumption is the highest. The report said that the relation between bone health and calcium consumption is poor. Just the way mother’s milk is indispensable for a human baby, cow’s milk owing to its very nature is ideal for calves.

Besides, depleting calcium content in the bones, cow’s milk increases the risk of fracture and is an acidifying animal protein that takes a toll on the human digestive system as well. If you are still skeptical about these facts, then let a healthcare provider explain it in detail to you. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult the doctor and ask a free question.

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