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Urine For Eosinophilia Health Feed

Hlo sir i'm taking homeopathic medicine from last 6 months and my creatinine is always on 4.50 or less. Please tell me can I stop the medicine one day .my age is 25 year.

Hlo sir i'm taking homeopathic medicine from last 6 months and my creatinine is always on 4.50 or less. Please tell m...
You should still continue. Or take sarivadyasav 4tsf with equal amount of water after meals twice a day regularly.
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Bilateral renal concretions, echogenic debris seen in both kidneys is it dangerous or safe please suggest.

Bilateral renal concretions, echogenic debris seen in both kidneys is it dangerous or safe please suggest.
These are renal stones. Nothing to worry. It is start of stone formation. 1. Stay hydrated 2. Eat more calcium-rich foods 3. Eat less sodium 4. Eat fewer oxalate-rich foods-- foods high in oxalates are: spinach, chocolate, sweet potatoes, coffee, beets, peanuts, rhubarb, soy products, wheat bran. 5. Eat less animal protein 6. Avoid vitamin c supplements 7. Maintaining a healthy body weight 8. Reducing alcohol intake 9. Avoiding excessive caffeine consumption 10. Avoiding sugary drinks homeopathic medicines have good results. Consult online with details.
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Ectopic Kidney - How To Handle It?

Ectopic Kidney - How To Handle It?
While most of the health issues that arise in our body show prominent symptoms, some do not, and the patients discover the problem accidentally. One such condition is Ectopic kidney which is a congenital abnormality wherein the organ is located out of normal place. Generally, the kidneys start forming within the pelvis and then move into their position behind the rib cage. In the case of the ectopic kidney, one of the two kidneys does not move to the right place but may remain in the pelvis. Or it may move upward, but fails to reach its desired position. What's more, a kidney may cross over so that both the kidneys are located on the same side of the body.

How is the condition diagnosed?
An ectopic kidney may be able to function normally without causing any symptoms, and the diagnosis happens by chance. Sometimes, the health care provider may discover ectopic kidney after feeling a lump in the unusual position in the abdomen or may notice it due to urinary problems and pain in the abdomen.

What are the complications?
The most common complications of an ectopic kidney include problems in the drainage of urine from the kidney. At times, the urine may flow backwards from the bladder to the kidney, an issue which is medically termed as vesicoureteral reflux or VUR. This, in turn, can lead to a host of health issues such as:

Infection: Through urine, the human body can wash out bacteria and inhibits their growth in the kidneys as well as the urinary tract. When the kidney is out of its normal position, the urine gets trapped in the kidney itself or the ureter. The remaining urine allows the bacteria to grow and spread. Hence, an affected individual may suffer from back pain, abdominal pain, fever and chills and foul-smelling urine.
Formation of stones: Calcium and oxalate stones may form in the kidney due to the ectopic kidney. This happens when the urine remains in the urinary tract for a long span of time. It could lead to extreme pain on the sides of the body, blood in the urine, fever or chills, vomiting, burning sensation while urinating.
Trauma: When the ectopic kidney is present in the pelvis, it could become susceptible to injury from blunt trauma. Such people are required to wear protective gear while performing body contact sports.
What are the treatment options for an ectopic kidney?

If tests show evidence of obstruction, then surgery may be required for correcting the causes of obstruction for allowing better drainage of urine. Also, reflux can be fixed with the help of operation for altering the ureter. When there is extensive damage to the kidneys, then surgery may be required for complete removal of the kidney. So, depending on the condition of the patient, the necessary treatment process would be adopted by the nephrologist.
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Congestive Heart Failure - Factors That Make It Fatal!

Congestive Heart Failure - Factors That Make It Fatal!
Our survival is solely reliant on the working of the heart. It is this that makes the prospect of a heart failure so fatal and so terrifying. Notwithstanding what the heart evokes, a heart failure is not indicative of a defunct heart; but only a situation when the heart pumps weaker than what is generally deemed as natural. Consequently, the blood flows at a slower rate to the heart and the body that in turn increases pressure in the heart. The oxygen that is produced by the heart in such a scenario is scanty and insufficient for the body.

body responds with its own defense mechanism, as the heart, in an attempt to hold more blood, stretches its chambers. Though this strenuous effort may keep the blood moving, it would gradually and inevitably weary the heart with all the effort. Subsequently, the kidney responds by retaining more salt and fluid in the body. These fluids may accumulate in different parts of the body, mainly in the legs, feet, ankles leading to congestion in the body. This very condition in medical terminology is referred to as congestive heart failure.

Different causes can contribute to the onset of such a fatal condition. Some of them are

Coronary artery disease: In such a condition, the arteries supply insufficient amount of oxygen and blood to the heart. Subsequently, the heart receives scanty amount of nutrients and oxygen.
Heart attack: The sudden, unanticipated blockage of the coronary artery and the ensuing stoppage of the flow of the blood lead to a heart attack. The heart muscles are damaged in such a case and prevent the proper functioning.
Diseases: Though the term may be generic and over expansive, most of the ailments which people suffer from tend to manifest themselves by posing a potential threat to the functioning of the heart. A high blood pressure, kidney disease, even a thyroid disease can cause congestive heart failure.
Every disorder is preceded by certain symptoms, and congestive heart failure is no different. Some of them are

Fatigue: This is one of the most perceptible symptoms of congestive heart failure. One of the earliest premonitions of an impending heart failure is a nagging sense of weariness and lethargy.
Swelling: As the condition is characterized by accumulation and build-up of fluids in various part of the body, swelling is an inevitable symptom of this condition and a clear indication of the ailment.
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Chronic Kidney Disease - Know Signs Of It!

Chronic Kidney Disease - Know Signs Of It!
The kidneys are bean-shaped organs located on either side of the spine behind the abdominal organs. Their main function is the removal of wastes from the body. On any given day, the kidneys filter out about 200 litres of blood and remove the toxins from the body via water.

In addition to this, the kidneys also produce hormones which help in vitamin D regulation and blood pressure control. Also, the red blood cell production in the bone marrow is promoted by the kidneys.

Due to ageing or injury, the kidneys can get damaged which can deeply affect their function. Chronic kidney disease is caused by damage to the kidneys that occurs over months to years. The normal rate of filtration of the kidneys is known as glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and the normal value is about 90.

Lower the GFR, greater the severity of the kidney disease, as below

Stage I Slight kidney damage reduction of about 90
Stage II Mild kidney damage with GFR in the range of 60 to 90
Stage III Moderate kidney damage with GFR between 30 and 60
Stage IV Severe kidney damage with GFR between 15 and 30
Stage V Kidney failure which often requires dialysis.

GFR is calculated using a formula that includes a person s age, gender, race, and serum creatinine levels. Once kidney damage onsets, it may take years for progression. The sooner it is identified, the better is the prognosis.

Older age, feminine gender, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, kidney problems like polycystic disease, and recurrent kidney infections are some risk factors for developing chronic kidney disease.

Kidney damage can occur for a long time before the symptoms become evident. Also, if one kidney is affected by the loss of function, the other kidney often will compensate by taking the additional load. Over a period of time though, given that it has various functions, different symptoms will manifest. Common ones include:

Increased frequency of urination, especially at night
Increased fluid retention in the body, leading to puffiness of the ankles and eyes
Increased blood pressure
Increased fluid accumulation in the lungs, leading to shortness of breath, even with minimal exertion
Fluid around the heart leading to chest pain
Reduced red blood cell production, leading to anemia
Weak bones, due to vitamin D deficiency, leading to bone pain and even fractures
Generalized weakness and lethargy
Increased blood pressure
In a person who has likely risk factors, these symptoms should be watched for. Early detection helps in arresting disease progression and reduced treatment interventions.

Drug Rashes - How To Take Care Of It?

Drug Rashes - How To Take Care Of It?
Drug rashes are generally defined as the reaction of the body to certain kinds of diseases. Different drugs result in different kinds of diseases which sometimes are as dangerous as being life-threatening. There are different types of drug rashes. They can manifest in different forms. Common ones are:

1. Blisters and swelling
Many drugs result in acute blisters and swelling in different parts of the body. This condition, if unchecked may aggravate leading to dangerous consequences.

2. Prolonged high fever
Continuous rise in fever is often diagnosed as a serious consequence of certain drugs.

3. Abnormal redness of the skin
Few medicines often result in sudden reddening of the skin. This condition continues until the drug is discontinued.

4. Rash and itching
This is considered as one of the most common side-effects of medicines. Often medicines result in continuous itching and rashes on the skin that also causes swelling if unchecked.

5. Swelling of tissues
Tissues often swell up as a result of the consumption of certain medicines. Consequently, the concerned person experiences problems in breathing and often a drastic fall in blood pressure.

However, there are ways that one can adopt in order to combat drug rashes.

1. Identify and discontinue using the drug
One of the most essential ways of combating drug rashes is to identify the drug and immediately discontinue consuming it.

2. Avoid using chemicals
One way of easy recuperation is to avoid using chemicals, soaps on the affected areas. If continued to use, they aggravate the already caused damage. On the other hand, calamine can be used for treating drugs.

3. Wear loose-fitting clothes.
Wearing tight clothes that sticks to the body further damages the skin. Instead one should try to wear loose fitting clothes that allow the skin to heal.

4. Apply cool compresses.
Taking cool showers or applying cool compresses over the affected areas significantly help to recuperate fast.

Renal Tumors - Know Forms Of Them!

Renal Tumors - Know Forms Of Them!
People often confuse renal tumors with renal cancer. Not all renal tumors are malignant in nature. Some of them can be benign as well. Mentioned below are the renal tumors, both benign as well as malignant.

Benign Renal Tumors
As the term suggests, these tumors are noncancerous and do not metastasize. The benign renal tumors can be of the following types

Renal Adenoma: One of the most common types of benign renal tumors, renal adenoma are asymptomatic, low-grade, solid tumors which are quite small in size. It is yet not known as to what triggers the occurrence of renal adenoma. The renal adenoma seldom interferes with the normal kidney function. There may, however, be a problem if this tumor grows in size, where they mimic the RCC (Renal cell carcinoma) in their symptoms.
Angiomyolipoma: This type of benign renal tumor is rare and often triggered by a genetic mutation (inherited). Also called Renal Hamartoma, the tumor is often found to be a complication associated with Tuberous Sclerosis (a genetic condition that results in tumor formation in different body parts including the kidney). Angiomyolipoma, not triggered by Tuberous Sclerosis is often found to affect women who are middle-aged.
Renal Oncocytoma: The trigger for Renal Oncocytoma is not known. Unlike the renal adenomas, renal oncocytoma can grow quite large in size and are usually asymptomatic, with males being more susceptible to the condition. Another striking feature about renal oncocytoma is that it can occur in the other body parts as well.
Fibroma: As the name suggests, fibroma is benign tumors originating from the fibrous tissues on the kidneys or adjacent to it. These rare tumors are small in size, with the exact cause being unknown. Fibroma is asymptomatic, affecting women more than men.
Lipoma: Mainly affecting middle-aged women, lipomas are found to originate from the fat cells located within the kidney (renal capsule) or adjacent tissues. Lipomas can be painful and cause hematuria when they increase in size.
Malignant Renal Tumors
As the name suggests, there are cancerous tumors that can metastasize to other body parts. The malignant renal tumors can be of the following types

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC): Known to develop in the kidney tubules, the cancerous outgrowths can cause renal obstruction. One of the most common types of renal cancer, RCC can affect one or both of the kidneys.
Depending on the microscopic observation, RCC may further be divided into
Clear Cell RCC: Accounting for nearly 80% of the total RCC, under a microscope, the clear cell RCC appears clear and pale.
Papillary RCC: Accounting for 10-15 percent of RCC, the Papillary RCC is characterized by the formation of finger-like projections within the tumor.
Chromophobe RCC: The Chromophobe RCC are large with microscopically appearing clear and pale.
Collecting duct RCC: Being quite aggressive, cancer cells in collecting duct RCC results in the formation of irregular tubes inside the renal tumor
Transitional cell carcinoma: Also referred to as Urothelial Cancer or Renal Pelvis Carcinoma, the transitional cell carcinoma forms at the merger point of the kidney and the ureter.
Renal sarcoma: It is a rare type of renal cancer originating in the connective tissue of the kidney.

Chronic Kidney Disease - Know The Classifications Of It!

Chronic Kidney Disease - Know The Classifications Of It!
The kidneys are bean-shaped organs located on either side of the spine behind the abdominal organs. Their main function is the removal of wastes from the body. On any given day, the kidneys filter out about 200 litres of blood and remove the toxins from the body via water.

In addition to this, the kidneys also produce hormones which help in vitamin D regulation and blood pressure control. Also, the red blood cell production in the bone marrow is promoted by the kidneys.

Due to ageing or injury, the kidneys can get damaged which can deeply affect their function. Chronic kidney disease is caused by damage to the kidneys that occurs over months to years. The normal rate of filtration of the kidneys is known as glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and the normal value is about 90.

Lower the GFR, greater the severity of the kidney disease, as below

Stage I Slight kidney damage reduction of about 90
Stage II Mild kidney damage with GFR in the range of 60 to 90
Stage III Moderate kidney damage with GFR between 30 and 60
Stage IV Severe kidney damage with GFR between 15 and 30
Stage V Kidney failure which often requires dialysis.

GFR is calculated using a formula that includes a person s age, gender, race, and serum creatinine levels. Once kidney damage onsets, it may take years for progression. The sooner it is identified, the better is the prognosis.

Older age, feminine gender, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, kidney problems like polycystic disease, and recurrent kidney infections are some risk factors for developing chronic kidney disease.

Kidney damage can occur for a long time before the symptoms become evident. Also, if one kidney is affected by the loss of function, the other kidney often will compensate by taking the additional load. Over a period of time though, given that it has various functions, different symptoms will manifest. Common ones include:

Increased frequency of urination, especially at night
Increased fluid retention in the body, leading to puffiness of the ankles and eyes
Increased blood pressure
Increased fluid accumulation in the lungs, leading to shortness of breath, even with minimal exertion
Fluid around the heart leading to chest pain
Reduced red blood cell production, leading to anemia
Weak bones, due to vitamin D deficiency, leading to bone pain and even fractures
Generalized weakness and lethargy
Increased blood pressure
In a person who has likely risk factors, these symptoms should be watched for. Early detection helps in arresting disease progression and reduced treatment interventions.

Does Diabetes Affect The Kidneys?

Does Diabetes Affect The Kidneys?
Diabetes is a disorder that is characterized by an inability of the pancreas to produce enough insulin or effectively utilize the insulin produced by the body. Insulin is the hormone that is produced by the pancreas to metabolize sugar in the body, the sugar that is present in the food that you consume.

Diabetes is commonly classified into two types: Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

In Type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas do not produce insulin in the required amounts; this disorder usually tends to occur in children. Type 2 diabetes generally occurs in people who are above 40 years of age; this type is characterized by an inability of the body to efficiently utilize the insulin produced by the pancreas.

How can diabetes affect your kidneys?

Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes damages your kidneys filters. If the filters are damaged, a protein called albumin, which you need to stay healthy, leaks out of your blood and into your urine. Damaged kidneys do not do a good job of filtering wastes and extra fluid from your blood. The wastes and extra fluid build up in your blood and make you sick.

Diabetes is a leading cause of kidney disease. Diabetic kidney disease is the medical term for kidney disease caused by diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease affects both kidneys at the same time.

Signs of Kidney Disease in Patients with Diabetes

Albumin/protein in the urine
High blood pressure
Ankle and leg swelling, leg cramps
Going to the bathroom more often at night
High levels of BUN and creatinine in the blood
Less need for insulin or antidiabetic medications
Morning sickness, nausea and vomiting
Weakness, paleness and anemia
Itching
What are the possible complications?

End-stage kidney failure: If this occurs then you would need kidney dialysis or a kidney transplant.
Cardiovascular diseases: Diabetics have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease, stroke and peripheral arterial disease. If you have diabetes and diabetic kidney disease, your risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is increased further.
High blood pressure: Kidney disease has a tendency to increase blood pressure. In addition, increased blood pressure has a tendency to make kidney disease worse. Treatment of high blood pressure is one of the main treatments of diabetic kidney disease.
What to do?

It is essential to get your urine checked at least once every year to detect signs of kidney damage.
Some other symptoms that you may experience are swelling in the ankles, weight gain and a rise in your blood pressure.
The first step to treat kidney damage caused by diabetes is to get your blood sugar levels under control.
You should also avoid consuming medications that can cause damage to the kidneys.
A kidney transplant or dialysis may be advised if the damage to kidneys is significant.
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My creatinine level is 1.4.is this the matter of concerned? It can be low down with out medicine or with out consulting a doctor?

My creatinine level is 1.4.is this the matter of concerned? It can be low down with out medicine or with out consulti...
Hello Lybrate-user, It is serious. And without medicine it may not be possible to reduce. Once it increases more than certain limit it will require dialysis. So think before experimenting.
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