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Dr. P. Chiranjeevi Raju

Pediatrician, Hyderabad

150 at clinic
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Dr. P. Chiranjeevi Raju Pediatrician, Hyderabad
150 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. P. Chiranjeevi Raju
Dr. P. Chiranjeevi Raju is a popular Pediatrician in Kukatpally, Hyderabad. You can meet Dr. P. Chiranjeevi Raju personally at Konaseema Hospitals in Kukatpally, Hyderabad. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. P. Chiranjeevi Raju on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Pediatricians in India. You will find Pediatricians with more than 35 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Pediatricians online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Konaseema Hospitals

Mig 527, Near Sankya Hospitals, Road No 1, Kphb Colony, Kukatpally. Landmark:Near Gandhi Statue, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
150 at clinic
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Im a mother of 2.8 years old twin girls. Can I give them a very small quantity of Dabur Chyavanprash daily and then gradually increase to one spoon. They are just 11 kgs and born premature. Very poor eating habit and has constipation problem.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
Im a mother of 2.8 years old twin girls. Can I give them a very small quantity of Dabur Chyavanprash daily and then g...
U may give but remember that house cooked nutritious diet of their taste n choice is good for health. Fibrous diet n good quantity of liquid shall be helpful for constipation.
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Effects of Parental Alienation Syndrome on Children

Post Graduate Diploma in Pyschology
Psychologist, Noida
Effects of Parental Alienation Syndrome on Children

In many cases; divorce and separation leads not only to bad blood between the parents, but also in a child alienating himself from one parent. Insulting or belittling one parent without justification or under pressure from the other parent is known as parental alienation syndrome. Parental alienation involves one parent undermining the other and interfering with the child’s relationship with the other parent by limiting contact with them, bad mouthing them, forbidding discussion about them etc. This can have a very negative effect on the child’s emotional state.

1. Self hatred: For children, hatred is not inborn, but developed by the situations they are in. By bad mouthing a parent and teaching the child to hate the parent, the child himself is harmed. With time, he begins to internalize this hatred and believe that there is something wrong with him that made the alienated parent not want him.

2. Low self esteem: When a child is not allowed to speak his mind and has to bottle up his thoughts, he becomes socially withdrawn. Often the child begins to feel that he is the cause for the rift in the family and makes himself responsible for the separation. This intensifies with time and makes the child lose confidence in himself leading to low self esteem.

3. Lack of trust: When a child is suddenly pulled away from one parent and told how that parent is not a ‘good person’ the child is likely to feel betrayed. This creates a sense of doubt in the child’s mind and makes it difficult for him to trust other people. As he grows up, this can affect his own adult relationships as well.

4. Depression: Depression is a commonly seen in children from broken homes and this is intensified in cases of parental alienation. It is rooted in the child’s feeling unloved by either one of the parents and built up by the separation. Not being given a chance to speak about their feelings or talk about the situation makes them more depressed and they begin to withdraw into themselves. In many cases, it is noted that alienated children have strained relationships with their own children as well.

5. Substance abuse: Depression is one of the most common triggers for substance abuse. Alienated children often feels trapped and that they have no outlet to vent their feelings and frustrations. This often makes them turn towards drugs for relief and can make them victims of substance abuse. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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Meri beti 8 mahine ki hai. Maine use 6 month tak calcimax syrup diya hai aur multi vitamin bhi diya hai .to kya abhi main yeh syrup continue karu ya nahi.

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health (DCH)
Pediatrician, Gondiya
Meri beti 8 mahine ki hai. Maine use 6 month tak calcimax syrup diya hai aur multi vitamin bhi diya hai .to kya abhi ...
u should continue calcimax till 2 yrs age. also start iron drops which are recommended till 1 yr age.
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My blood group is B+ and my to be wife's blood group is B-.so, can we face any problem for birth of child. Any precaution needed?

MBBS, MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, FNB Reproductive Medicine
IVF Specialist, Bangalore
My blood group is B+ and my to be wife's blood group is B-.so, can we face any problem for birth of child. Any precau...
Hi lybrate-user, It may be a problem if your wife is carrying an rh positive baby and is already sensitised to rh positive blood. Your doctor will advice blood tests to find out about the same and will give injection to prevent any complications from happening. Also regular monitoring may be required.
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Is it safe to give my 19 months old daughter, syrup cepodem 100 for cough. What dose I should give her.

Fellowship In Rhinology, MS (ENT), DNB (ENT)
ENT Specialist, Delhi
Is it safe to give my 19 months old daughter, syrup cepodem 100 for cough. What dose I should give her.
Antibiotics should not be used in every case, the abuse of antibiotics has resulted in their resistance. Most of the cases are due to viral in origin and thus don't require the antibiotics. And as far as the dose is concerned, it's based on the weight of the child which is missing in the query.
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It's observed infection in her stool microscopic report she is taking now ciplox 250 tab is this a effective medicine?

MBBS, MD
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
Oral ciplx dose for age in HE condition is fairly alright. It is given for five days dose as per age./weight. Drug is less commonly used in children.
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Sir my daughter is1& half year old. More than ten days she is affected urinary infection, she is very struggle to pass urine and it' s code' s very bad smell and few drops only coming. Please sir give me a suggestion.

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Bangalore
You need to give her plenty of water and other liquids. Also get a urine test, routine and microscopy done, and show the report and your baby to your regular pediatrician.
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Is dysentery common in infants, sometimes it is greenish in colour why also is there anything that mothers should not eat, commonly people tend to say not to eat apple, banana as it causes formation of sputum. Kindly suggest.

Pediatrician, Jaipur
Is dysentery common in infants, sometimes it is greenish in colour why also is there anything that mothers should not...
Usually baby's stools are not affected by whatever mother eats, colour depends on how much time food stayed in 4 mts long intestine, if it's stay is normal 6hrs it's yellow, if it's faster it's green, of it's still faster it's white, that means white or colourless stools are worst.
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My son is 5 years old and even now he wets his bed while sleeping (within 2 hours of his sleep), its not because he drinks too much of water before that. What I have observed is he is unable to control/hold it for a while during the day as well. Please advice.

DCH, MBBS
Pediatrician, Pune
Hello Sir, Greetings. He will need toilet training in which you will have to teach him, how to hold urine while urinating. Tell him to try it while urinating, gradually he will be able to control it. Avoid him any fluid intake after 7-8 pm and wake him up at regular intervals for micturition in the night hours. I hope it will help. If no relief, please consult nearby Pediatrician for thorough examination and medication. Regards.
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Take Care of Your Child's Diet

MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad

Making appropriate food choices for your baby during the first year of life is very important. More growth occurs during the first year than at any other time in your child's life. It's important to feed your baby a variety of healthy foods at the proper time. Starting good eating habits at this early stage will help set healthy eating patterns for life.

Recommended feeding guide for the first year

Don't give solid foods unless your child's health care provider advises you to do so. Solid foods should not be started before age 4 months because:

  • Breast milk or formula provides your baby all the nutrients that are needed for growth.
  • Your baby isn't physically developed enough to eat solid food from a spoon.
  • Feeding your baby solid food too early may lead to overfeeding and being overweight.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all infants, children, and adolescents take in enough vitamin D through supplements, formula, or cow's milk to prevent complications from deficiency of this vitamin. In November 2008, the AAP updated its recommendations for daily intake of vitamin D for healthy infants, children, and adolescents. It is now recommended that the minimum intake of vitamin D for these groups should be 400 IU per day, beginning soon after birth. Your baby's health care provider can recommend the proper type and amount of vitamin D supplement for your baby.

Guide for formula feeding (0 to 5 months)

Age

Amount of formula per feeding

Number of feedings per 24 hours

1 month

2 to 4 ounces

6 to 8 times

2 months

5 to 6 ounces

5 to 6 times

3 to 5 months

6 to 7 ounces

5 to 6 times

Feeding tips for your child

These are some things to consider when feeding your baby:

  • When starting solid foods, give your baby one new food at a time — not mixtures (like cereal and fruit or meat dinners). Give the new food for 3 to 5 days before adding another new food. This way you can tell what foods your baby may be allergic to or can't tolerate.
  • Begin with small amounts of new solid foods — a teaspoon at first and slowly increase to a tablespoon.
  • Begin with dry infant rice cereal first, mixed as directed, followed by vegetables, fruits, and then meats.
  • Don't use salt or sugar when making homemade infant foods. Canned foods may contain large amounts of salt and sugar and shouldn't be used for baby food. Always wash and peel fruits and vegetables and remove seeds or pits. Take special care with fruits and vegetables that come into contact with the ground. They may contain botulism spores that cause food poisoning.
  • Infant cereals with iron should be given to your infant until your infant is age 18 months.
  • Cow's milk shouldn't be added to the diet until your infant is age 1. Cow's milk doesn't provide the proper nutrients for your baby.
  • The AAP recommends not giving fruit juices to infants younger than age 6 months. Only pasteurized, 100% fruit juices (without added sugar) may be given to older infants and children, and should be limited to 4 ounces a day. Dilute the juice with water and offer it in a cup with a meal.
  • Feed all food with a spoon. Your baby needs to learn to eat from a spoon. Don't use an infant feeder. Only formula and water should go into the bottle.
  • Avoid honey in any form for your child's first year, as it can cause infant botulism.
  • Don't put your baby in bed with a bottle propped in his or her mouth. Propping a bottle has been linked to an increased risk of ear infections. Once your baby's teeth are present, propping the bottle can also cause tooth decay. There is also a risk of choking.
  • Help your baby to give up the bottle by his or her first birthday.
  • Avoid the "clean plate syndrome." Forcing your child to eat all the food on his or her plate even when he or she isn't hungry isn't a good habit. It teaches your child to eat just because the food is there, not because he or she is hungry. Expect a smaller and pickier appetite as the baby's growth rate slows around age 1.
  • Infants and young children shouldn't eat hot dogs, nuts, seeds, round candies, popcorn, hard, raw fruits and vegetables, grapes, or peanut butter. These foods aren't safe and may cause your child to choke. Many health care providers suggest these foods be saved until after your child is age 3 or 4. Always watch a young child while he or she is eating. Insist that the child sit down to eat or drink.
  • Healthy infants usually require little or no extra water, except in very hot weather. When solid food is first fed to your baby, extra water is often needed.
  • Don't limit your baby's food choices to the ones you like. Offering a wide variety of foods early will pave the way for good eating habits later.
  • Fat and cholesterol shouldn't be restricted in the diets of very young children, unless advised by your child's health care provider. Children need calories, fat, and cholesterol for the development of their brains and nervous systems, and for general growth.

Feeding guide for the first year (4 to 8 months)

Item

4 to 6 months

7 months

8 months

Breastfeeding or formula

4 to 6 feedings per day or 28 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

Dry infant cereal with iron

3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

5 to 8 tbs. single grain cereal mixed with formula

Fruits

1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

Vegetables

1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., strained, mashed, soft/2 times per day

Meats and protein foods

 

1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

Juices, vitamin C fortified

 

4 oz. from a cup

4 oz. from a cup

Snacks

 

Arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers

Arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt

Development

Make first cereal feedings very soupy and thicken slowly.

Start finger foods and cup.

Formula intake decreases; solid foods in diet increase.

Feeding guide for the first year (9 to 12 months)

Item

9 months

10 to 12 months

Breastfeeding or formula

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 4 feedings per day or 24 to 30 ounces per day

Dry infant cereal with iron

5 to 8tbs. any variety mixed with formula

5 to 8 tbs. any variety mixed with formula per day

Fruits

2 to 4 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

2 to 4 tbs., mashed or strained, cooked/2 times per day

Vegetables

2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

Meats and protein foods

2 to 3 tbs. of tender, chopped/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., finely chopped, table meats, fish without bones, mild cheese/2 times per day

Juices, vitamin C fortified

4 oz. from a cup

4 oz. from a cup

Starches

 

1/4-1/2 cup mashed potatoes, macaroni, spaghetti, bread/2 times per day

Snacks

Arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans

Arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans, cottage cheese, ice cream, pudding, dry cereal

Development

Eating more table foods. Make sure diet has good variety.

Baby may change to table food. Baby will feed himself or herself and use a spoon and cup.

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