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Dr. Madhusudan

Pediatrician, Hyderabad

100 at clinic
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Dr. Madhusudan Pediatrician, Hyderabad
100 at clinic
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Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Madhusudan
Dr. Madhusudan is a popular Pediatrician in Malkajgiri, Hyderabad. You can meet Dr. Madhusudan personally at Dr Madhusudan Clinic in Malkajgiri, Hyderabad. Book an appointment online with Dr. Madhusudan on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Pediatricians in India. You will find Pediatricians with more than 28 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Pediatricians online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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5-24/2/1, Below China Bazar, Raghavendra Theatre Lane, Malkajgiri, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
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What You Need to Know About Clubfoot?

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
What You Need to Know About Clubfoot?

What You Need to Know About Clubfoot?

clubfoot is a common condition where an infant is born with a foot that turns in

  • Clubfoot most often presents at birth.

  • Clubfoot is caused by a shortened Achilles tendon, which causes the foot to turn in and under.

  • Clubfoot is twice as common in boys.

  • Treatment is necessary to correct clubfoot and is usually done in two phases — casting and bracing.

  • Children with clubfoot should be able to take part in regular daily activities once the condition is treated.

What is clubfoot?

Clubfoot is a foot deformity classified into three different types: idiopathic (unknown cause), neurogenic (caused by condition of the nervous system) and syndromic (related to an underlying syndrome).

Idiopathic Clubfoot

Also known as talipes equinovarus, idiopathic clubfoot is the most common type of clubfoot and is present at birth. This congenital anomaly is seen in one out of every 1,000 babies, with half of the cases of club foot involving only one foot. There is currently no known cause of idiopathic clubfoot, but baby boys are twice as likely to have clubfoot compared to baby girls.

Neurogenic Clubfoot

Neurogenic clubfoot is caused by an underlying neurologic condition. For instance, a child born with spina bifida A clubfoot may also develop later in childhood due to cerebral palsy or a spinal cord compression.

Syndromic Clubfoot

Syndromic clubfoot is found along with a number of other clinical conditions, which relate to an underlying syndrome. Examples of syndromes where a clubfoot can occur include arthrogryposis, constriction band syndrome, tibial hemimelia and diastrophic dwarfism.

What are the signs and symptoms of clubfoot?

In a clubfoot, the Achilles tendon is too short, causing the foot to stay pointed — also known as “fixing the foot in equinus.” The foot is also turned in and under. The bones of the foot and ankle are all present but are misaligned due to differences in the muscles and tendons acting on the foot.

What are the risk factors of clubfoot?

  • Having a parent or sibling with clubfoot

  • Maternal smoking during pregnancy

  • Male

Clubfoot Diagnosis

Foot imbalance due to clubfoot may be noticed during a fetal screening ultrasound as early as 12 weeks gestation, but the diagnosis of clubfoot is confirmed by physical exam at birth.

Clubfoot Treatment

The treatment for clubfoot consists of two phases: Ponseti serial casting and bracing. Treatment is always necessary, because the condition does not get better with growth.

Ponseti Serial Casting

A supramalleolar orthosis with bar is used for bracing after an infant has completed casting treatment for clubfoot

The Ponseti technique of serial casting is a treatment method that involves careful stretching and manipulation of the foot and holding with a cast. The first cast is applied one to two weeks after the baby is born. The cast is then changed in the office every seven to 10 days. With the fourth or fifth cast, a small in-office procedure is also needed to lengthen the Achilles tendon. This is done using a local numbing medicine and small blade. Afterward, the baby is placed into one last cast, which remains on for two to three weeks.

Bracing for Clubfoot

While the casting corrects the foot deformity, bracing maintains the correction. Without bracing, the clubfoot would redevelop. The day the last cast is removed, the baby is fit in a supramalleolar orthosis with a bar. These braces are worn 23 hours a day for two months, then 12 hours a day (naps plus nighttime) until kindergarten age.

Life after Treatment of Clubfoot

A well-corrected clubfoot looks no different than a normal foot. Sports, dance and normal daytime footwear are the expectations for a child born with a clubfoot. This condition will not hold a child back from normal activities. 

1 person found this helpful

My 3 n half month old is not taking feed from my right breast What could be the reason.

MBBS, MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, FMAS, DMAS
Gynaecologist, Noida
Hello, You may have developed a cracked nipple which may have caused blocked ducts, so check yourself manually for adequate expression through right breast and then try again.
1 person found this helpful
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I have 23 days old daughter. She poops after every feed almost 12-15 times a day. Is it fine or shall we consult a doctor.

MBBS, MD - Paediatrics, DCH
Pediatrician, Bangalore
Dear, Don't worry. Your daughter is on only breast milk and frequent stool passage is normal at her age. Do burp her after every feed.Check her weight gain and if adequate just wait. Dr Srinathks
1 person found this helpful
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My son aged 6 years old not talk with his friends & others as well as he feels very shy. He is not interested to play with friends. He only interested to watch cartoons in tv.Please suggest

MD - Paediatrics, Diploma in Child Health (DCH)
Pediatrician, Mumbai
Shyness is a personality character and is not necessarily a disease. Some are born shy, some are born extroverted, some are aggressive, some are calm. There is really no cure of shyness. But with time, things improve. You can try and cut his tv time and forcibly send him down to play. You can enroll him in classes which need him to interact with the teacher and others. And you just need for him to grow up and reach his own potential.
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M.D.( Pediatrics), DCH
Pediatrician,
A regular bed time routine is very necessary for a child.
1 person found this helpful

I am blessed with a son of 3 months how to avoid his acute vomiting. Please advise.

MBBS DCH
Pediatrician, Gandhinagar
I am blessed with a son of 3 months how to avoid his acute vomiting. Please advise.
If your baby is active, gaining weight properly, don't worry about vomiting. It will not affect his growth.
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Hi madam, my wife is 28 weeks pregnant, she had high blood pressure due to that we admitted in boring hospital , doctors are saying due to high bp a sufficient blood is not passing to the baby, they are saying baby is weak due to less amount of blood , we have to deliver the baby now only or else it will be problem for both mother and baby, even though if we deliver we can't save baby , I don't know what to do, pls suggest me I want to save both baby and the mother pls reply me soon pls pls.

MBBS, PG Diploma In Clinical Cosmetology (PGDCC)
Cardiologist, Purba
Hi madam, my wife is 28 weeks pregnant, she had high blood pressure due to that we admitted in boring hospital , doct...
If severe high bp it is dangerous for mother and baby the doctors do the best to save and if proper facilities not avilable locally take her to a good hospital with better facility with neonatal care where the premature baby can be taken care of.
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MAMC, MRCPCH, MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Noida
How do I know if my child has a growth disorder?

A child's growth pattern is an important part of determining normal growth. No child has a perfectly steady growth rate; children go through growth spurts and periods of slower growth. The best way to evaluate a child's growth pattern is to plot the child's height and weight on a growth chart. This can be completed by a doctor or a health care practitioner, at school, or even at home. The growth chart will show the child's growth over a period of time.

Any departure from a prior growth pattern appropriate for the child's genetic background may signal the appearance of a disease. Contact a doctor or healthcare practitioner if the child's growth or height is a concern. The doctor may suggest seeing a specialist paediatric Endocrinologist who can perform tests to determine if the child has a hormone deficiency.

My son is 1 years 3 months old. His body weight is 9.5 kg .Please tell me dosage of walamycin suspension and for how many days it should be given.

M.D.( Pediatrics), DCH
Pediatrician,
My son is 1 years 3 months old. His body weight is 9.5 kg .Please tell me dosage of walamycin suspension and for how ...
Walamycin should not be used without prescription. Moreover it is not used in GI infections, as it has no role.
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My 10 month old baby girl skin is becoming so dry and is scaly at some places. Her cheeks are becoming red. Please suggest some natural remedy or any moisturizer or lotion to make her better.

MBBS, MD - Paediatrics
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
My 10 month old baby girl skin is becoming so dry and is scaly at some places. Her cheeks are becoming red. Please su...
Your baby might be suffering from eczema which is a skin condition associated with extreme dryness. This condition slowly improves with time mostly by 2 years of age. Please use thick moisturizing creams like Oilatum for her skin and also you can apply coconut oil as home remedy. Although, see a Paediatrician once to confirm the condition.
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My baby is 10 months old. As I am a working lady, he was fed formula milk along with breast milk since birth. He started eating when he became 6 months old. Now he is on food and breast milk, formula milk is totally discontinued. Can I give him cow's milk now?

B.Sc.(Hons), P.G.Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Gurgaon
My baby is 10 months old. As I am a working lady, he was fed formula milk along with breast milk since birth. He star...
Hello lybrate-user, yes can give cow's milk because cow's milk is very light and easily digestible. But don' skip breast milk fully.
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My Daughter (Age 10 month) has been suffering from fever (101-102, by underarm) from last 3 days. First day her nose was running a lot. But next day onward her nose was ok. On third day there was no fever for almost 18 hrs but again at mid night she got fever. I am giving her Maxtra-P (60ml) according to doctor. Should I go for antibiotic? Is it viral fever or common cold.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
My Daughter (Age 10 month) has been suffering from fever (101-102, by underarm) from last 3 days. First day her nose ...
I suppose there are no other symptoms except you have narrated. It is usually viral fever but 101-102 temp by under arm should be taken care of. No fever for 18 hours may be due to medicine you are giving. There is no role of antibiotcs in viral fever unless it is super imposed secondry bacterial infection. Your doctor is best judge to assess.
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My daughter is 2 months 2 weeks old. Her birth weight was 3.16 kg. She is fully on breastfeeding. Now she is 3.8 kg. Till now she gained just 1 kg after losing some from her birth weight. Is this normal? She is wetting more than 10 cloth diapers a day and she is passing stools two days once. I used to feed more than 8 times a day. She gets satisfied after each feed. I'm worried that she is not gaining weight properly. Pls reply.

MBBS, FELLOWSHIP IN PAEDIATRICS
Pediatrician, Ghaziabad
My daughter is 2 months 2 weeks old. Her birth weight was 3.16 kg. She is fully on breastfeeding. Now she is 3.8 kg. ...
Yes its absolutely normal. Good urine output is a sign of adequate feeding and googd growth. Babies loose weight initailly after birth and then later start gaining it. As long as your baby is active, growing properly (reaching milestones on time). Nothing to worry. Normally babie wet 8-10 cotton nappies or 6-8 diapers in case if your are using diapers.
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Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Children

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Children

What is ADHD?

ADHD, also called attention-deficit disorder, is a behavior disorder, usually first diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by inattention, impulsivity, and, in some cases, hyperactivity. These symptoms usually occur together; however, one may occur without the other(s).

The symptoms of hyperactivity, when present, are almost always apparent by the age of 7 and may be present in very young preschoolers. Inattention or attention-deficit may not be evident until a child faces the expectations of elementary school.

What are the different types of ADHD?

Three major types of ADHD include the following:

  • ADHD, combined type. This, the most common type of ADHD, is characterized by impulsive and hyperactive behaviors as well as inattention and distractibility.

  • ADHD, impulsive/hyperactive type. This, the least common type of ADHD, is characterized by impulsive and hyperactive behaviors without inattention and distractibility.

  • ADHD, inattentive and distractible type. This type of ADHD is characterized predominately by inattention and distractibility without hyperactivity.

What causes attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

ADHD is one of the most researched areas in child and adolescent mental health. However, the precise cause of the disorder is still unknown. Available evidence suggests that ADHD is genetic. It is a brain-based biological disorder. Low levels of dopamine (a brain chemical), which is a neurotransmitter (a type of brain chemical), are found in children with ADHD. Brain imaging studies using PET scanners (positron emission tomography; a form of brain imaging that makes it possible to observe the human brain at work) show that brain metabolism in children with ADHD is lower in the areas of the brain that control attention, social judgment, and movement.

Who is affected by attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

Estimates suggest that about 4% to 12% of children have ADHD. Boys are 2 to 3 times more likely to have ADHD of the hyperactive or combined type than girls.

Many parents of children with ADHD experienced symptoms of ADHD when they were younger. ADHD is commonly found in brothers and sisters within the same family. Most families seek help when their child's symptoms begin to interfere with learning and adjustment to the expectations of school and age-appropriate activities.

What are the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

The following are the most common symptoms of ADHD. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. The 3 categories of symptoms of ADHD include the following:

  • Inattention:

    • Short attention span for age (difficulty sustaining attention)

    • Difficulty listening to others

    • Difficulty attending to details

    • Easily distracted

    • Forgetfulness

    • Poor organizational skills for age

    • Poor study skills for age

  • Impulsivity:

    • Often interrupts others

    • Has difficulty waiting for his or her turn in school and/or social games

    • Tends to blurt out answers instead of waiting to be called upon

    • Takes frequent risks, and often without thinking before acting

  • Hyperactivity:

    • Seems to be in constant motion; runs or climbs, at times with no apparent goal except motion

    • Has difficulty remaining in his/her seat even when it is expected

    • Fidgets with hands or squirms when in his or her seat; fidgeting excessively

    • Talks excessively

    • Has difficulty engaging in quiet activities

    • Loses or forgets things repeatedly and often

    • Inability to stay on task; shifts from one task to another without bringing any to completion

The symptoms of ADHD may resemble other medical conditions or behavior problems. Keep in mind that many of these symptoms may occur in children and teens who do not have ADHD. A key element in diagnosis is that the symptoms must significantly impair adaptive functioning in both home and school environments. Always consult your child's doctor for a diagnosis.

How is attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosed?

ADHD is the most commonly diagnosed behavior disorder of childhood. A pediatrician, child psychiatrist, or a qualified mental health professional usually identifies ADHD in children. A detailed history of the child's behavior from parents and teachers, observations of the child's behavior, and psychoeducational testing contribute to making the diagnosis of ADHD. Because ADHD is a group of symptoms, diagnosis depends on evaluating results from several different sources, including physical, neurological, and psychological testing. Certain tests may be used to rule out other conditions, and some may be used to test intelligence and certain skill sets. Consult your child's doctor for more information.

Treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Specific treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder will be determined by your child's doctor based on:

  • Your child's age, overall health, and medical history

  • Extent of your child's symptoms

  • Your child's tolerance for specific medications or therapies

  • Expectations for the course of the condition

  • Your opinion or preference

Major components of treatment for children with ADHD include parental support and education in behavioral training, appropriate school placement, and medication. Treatment with a psychostimulant is highly effective in most children with ADHD.

Treatment may include:

  • Psychostimulant medications. These medications are used for their ability to balance chemicals in the brain that prohibit the child from maintaining attention and controlling impulses. They help "stimulate" or help the brain to focus and may be used to reduce the major characteristics of ADHD.
    Medications that are commonly used to treat ADHD include the following:

    • Methylphenidate (Ritalin, Metadate, Concerta, Methylin)

    • Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, Dextrostat)

    • A mixture of amphetamine salts (Adderall)

    • Atomoxetine (Strattera). A nonstimulant SNRI (selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) medication with benefits for related mood symptoms. 

    • Lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse)

    Psychostimulants have been used to treat childhood behavior disorders since the 1930s and have been widely studied. Traditional immediate release stimulants take effect in the body quickly, work for 1 to 4 hours, and then are eliminated from the body. Many long-acting stimulant medications are also available, lasting 8 to 9 hours, and requiring 1 daily dosing. Doses of stimulant medications need to be timed to match the child's school schedule to help the child pay attention for a longer period of time and improve classroom performance. The common side effects of stimulants may include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Insomnia

    • Decreased appetite

    • Stomach aches

    • Headaches

    • Jitteriness

    • Rebound activation (when the effect of the stimulant wears off, hyperactive and impulsive behaviors may increase for a short period of time)

    Most side effects of stimulant use are mild, decrease with regular use, and respond to dose changes. Always discuss potential side effects with your child's doctor.

    Antidepressant medications may also be administered for children and adolescents with ADHD to help improve attention while decreasing aggression, anxiety, and/or depression.

  • Psychosocial treatments. Parenting children with ADHD may be difficult and can present challenges that create stress within the family. Classes in behavior management skills for parents can help reduce stress for all family members. Training in behavior management skills for parents usually occurs in a group setting which encourages parent-to-parent support. Behavior management skills may include the following:

    • Point systems

    • Contingent attention (responding to the child with positive attention when desired behaviors occur; withholding attention when undesired behaviors occur)

    Teachers may also be taught behavior management skills to use in the classroom setting. Training for teachers usually includes use of daily behavior reports that communicate in-school behaviors to parents.

    Behavior management techniques tend to improve targeted behaviors (such as completing school work or keeping the child's hands to himself or herself), but are not usually helpful in reducing overall inattention, hyperactivity, or impulsivity.

Prevention of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Preventive measures to reduce the incidence of ADHD in children are not known at this time. However, early detection and intervention can reduce the severity of symptoms, decrease the interference of behavioral symptoms on school functioning, enhance the child's normal growth and development, and improve the quality of life experienced by children or adolescents with ADHD.

1 person found this helpful

Hellow sir, mera beta 3 saal ka hai ,uskay face pr moluscloum contalism ho rakhay hai, six month ho gay hain, pehlay ayurvedic illaz Karaya, lakin ussay koi faiydaa nhi huaa,an bagel skin institute say treatment chal raha hai, doctor kapoor say, please suggest ,kya Karu, main laser say nhi karana chat as treatment.

International Academy of Classical Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath,
tak china off 12c 2tims dy for wk arnica 30 one dose per dy for wk sulph 30 once dy for 10 days sil 200 one dose inform me progres
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My son is one month old ,he always pass gas and it seems he is having pain while passing stool. Can I start giving him gripe water? But some doctor suggested me tht I shld start giving him gripe water only in severe condition or after 6 months.

CCEBDM, PG Diploma In Clinical cardiology, MBBS
General Physician, Ghaziabad
My son is one month old ,he always pass gas and it seems he is having pain while passing stool. Can I start giving hi...
U can use but see it should be alcohol free and sucrose free. Before that try 1. Do regular massage of your baby with coconut/ olive oil. No baby oil 2. Wrap your baby properly in blanket/ other cloth 3. Apply pressure on tummy- put baby face down in lap and pat back.
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My son is 7 months old and Doctor prescribed ultra vitamin D3 syrup when he is born but they did not tell when to stop. Still we are feeding this syrup. Please suggest me when we can stop this syrup?

MBBS, MD
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
My son is 7 months old and Doctor prescribed ultra vitamin D3 syrup when he is born but they did not tell when to sto...
If you give small dose of d3 vit. You may continue for months. Exposure tomorning sunlight can be more helpful.
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Healthy Sex Talk to educate Kids of ages 5-12

MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Agra
Healthy Sex Talk to educate Kids of ages 5-12
A list of parenting action items, created in the hope that we can raise a generation of children who have less rape and sexual assault in their lives.

Teaching kids to respect one another’s space, from even a very young age, helps grow empathy.

1. Teach kids that the way their bodies are changing is great, but can sometimes be confusing. The way you talk about these changes—whether it’s loose teeth or pimples and pubic hair—will show your willingness to talk about other sensitive subjects.
Be scientific, direct, and answer any questions your child may have, without shame or embarrassment. Again, if your first instinct is to shush them because you are embarrassed, practice until you can act like it’s no big deal with your kid.

2. Encourage them to talk about what feels good and what doesn’t. Do you like to be tickled? Do you like to be dizzy? What else? What doesn’t feel good? Being sick, maybe? Or when another kid hurts you? Leave space for your child to talk about anything else that comes to mind.

3. Remind your child that everything they’re going through is natural, growing up happens to all of us.

4. Teach kids how to use safe-words during play, and help them negotiate a safe-word to use with their friends.
This is necessary because many kids like to disappear deep into their pretend worlds together, such as playing war games where someone gets captured, or putting on a stage play where characters may be arguing.
At this age, saying “no” may be part of the play, so they need to have one word that will stop all activity.

5. Teach kids to stop their play every once in a while to check in with one another. Teach them to take a T.O. (time out) every so often, to make sure everyone’s feeling okay.

6. Encourage kids to watch each others’ facial expressions during play to be sure everyone’s happy and on the same page.

7. Help kids interpret what they see on the playground and with friends. Ask what they could do or could have done differently to help. Play a “rewind” game, if they come home and tell you about seeing bullying.
“You told me a really hard story about your friend being hit. I know you were scared to step in. If we were to rewind the tape, what do you think you could do to help next time if you see it happen?” Improvise everything from turning into a superhero to getting a teacher.
Give them big props for talking to you about tough subjects.

8. Don’t tease kids for their boy-girl friendships, or for having crushes. Whatever they feel is okay. If their friendship with someone else seems like a crush, don’t mention it. You can ask them open questions like, “How is your friendship with Sarah going?” and be prepared to talk—or not talk—about it.

9. Teach children that their behaviors affect others. You can do this in simple ways, anywhere. Ask them to observe how people respond when other people make noise or litter. Ask them what they think will happen as a result. Will someone else have to clean up the litter? Will someone be scared? Explain to kids how the choices they make affect others and talk about when are good times to be loud, and what are good spaces to be messy.

10. Teach kids to look for opportunities to help. Can they pick up the litter? Can they be more quiet so as not to interrupt someone’s reading on the bus? Can they offer to help carry something or hold a door open? All of this teaches kids that they have a role to play in helping ease both proverbial and literal loads.

Common Side Effects of Uterine Fibroids

Certification in IVF & Infertility, Diplomate Gynae Laparoscopy, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (MRCOG), MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Ghaziabad
Common Side Effects of Uterine Fibroids

Many women develop uterine fibroids by the time they hit the age of 50 years and above. These are non-cancerous growths that may occur in the uterus. Most women go through severe bleeding and pain as well as discomfort as a result of these fibroids. Age, family history of the same condition, obesity or being overweight, eating habits and even ethnicity play a large role in deciding the risk of each individual patient. These fibroids can grow in the submucosal, intramural and subserosal areas.

Following are the common side effects of uterine fibroids:

  1. Frequent urination: Due to the pressure of the fibroids on the uterus, the patient may experience a constant feeling of fullness in the lower pelvic area of the body, which may lead to frequent filling of the bladder. This gives rise to frequent trips to the washroom for urination. 
  2. Heavy Bleeding: Severe bleeding is one of the most common causes of the presence of these kinds of fibroids. The patient may experience a lot of bleeding during menstrual periods, as well as pain and cramps the rest of the time. The periods will also be very painful when there are fibroids in the uterus or the uterine lining.
  3. Painful Intercourse: It is a well-known fact that any kind of infection or growth as well as sores and other such ailments can lead to vaginal dryness as well as pain during sexual intercourse. This is true for uterine fibroids as well, which can lead to severe pain during sexual activity. These fibroids can also give rise to pain in the lumbar or lower back region.
  4. Abdomen Swelling: The abdomen may go through significant swelling in such a condition and the patient may even look like she is pregnant. The growth can push the shape of the abdomen outwards and create a full feeling.
  5. Pregnancy Complications: The presence of uterine fibroids can give rise to several complications during pregnancy and even after child birth. One of the most common problems in this case is bleeding, followed by more severe outcomes like miscarriage. The women suffering from uterine fibroids are at greater risk of undergoing a caesarean section for the delivery of the baby. The baby may also be born breech and a premature delivery may take place. 
  6. Infertility: This is also a rare side effect of the uterine fibroids and is generally seen only in very severe cases. 
  7. Cancer: Only one in every 1000 cases might transform into malignant tumours. These uterine fibroids are generally known to be non-malignant. 

Any symptoms must be reported to a gynaecologist at the earliest to avoid any serious complications.

4640 people found this helpful

Hi! i'm having a baby girl. She is completing 2 yrs. She's till on motherfeed and won't quit. She has a poor intake of meals. She s slim, but active. Please suggest what to do?

M.D.( Pediatrics), DCH
Pediatrician,
If child with 13 kg weight at 2 years is active and playful. Parents should be happy and content, rather than worrying about intake. Poor intake is your perception, which may be born out of anxiety about her well-being. Respect her choice. Enjoy and play with her. Breast feeding can be stopped after 2 years.
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