Dr. David Murmu - Book Appointment, Consult Online, View Fees, Contact Number, Feedbacks | Speech Therapist in Kolkata

Dr. David Murmu

12 Years Experience
Personal Statement
To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.

More about Dr. David Murmu

Dr. David Murmu is an experienced Speech Therapist in Swiss park, Kolkata. He has helped numerous patients in his 12 years of experience as a Speech Therapist. He has completed BASLP. You can meet Dr. David Murmu personally at BENGAL SPEECH & HEARING PVT LTD in Swiss park, Kolkata. Book an appointment online with Dr. David Murmu and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Speech Therapists in India. You will find Speech Therapists with more than 44 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Speech Therapists online in Kolkata and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.
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Kolkata University
  • DNB (ENT), MS - ENT
    Ear-Nose-Throat (ENT) Specialist

    Here are some problems that can create difficulties in speaking

    4728 Thanks
  • FRHS, Ph.D Neuro , MPT - Neurology Physiotherapy, D.Sp.Med, DPHM (Health Management ), BPTh/BPT

    Free tongue movement in pre-verbal infants influences their perception.says Canadian researchers.

    The results showed a teether inserted into the mouth of an infant has an impact on the tongue tip and blade movement influencing speech perception.

    Speech perception is available even before infants accrue experience producing speech sounds.

    1 Thanks
  • Bachelor of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (B.A.S.L.P)
    Speech Therapist
    Stuttering is a speech disorder in which sounds, syllables, or words are repeated or last longer than normal. These problems cause a break in the flow of speech (called disfluency).
    Symptoms of stuttering may include:
    Feeling frustrated when trying to communicate
    Putting in (interjecting) extra sounds or words (" we went to the. Uh. Store")
    Repeating sounds, words, parts of words, or phrases (" I want. I want my doll" i. I see you" or" ca-ca-ca-can")
    Tension in the voice
    Very long sounds within words (" I am booooobbbby jones" or" llllllllike")
    Signs and tests:
    No testing is usually necessary. The diagnosis of stuttering may require consultation with a speech pathologist.
    There is no one best treatment for stuttering. Most early cases are short-term and resolve on their own. Speech therapy may be helpful if:
    Stuttering has lasted more than 3 - 6 months, or the" blocked" speech lasts several seconds. The child appears to be struggling when stuttering, or is embarrassed. There is a family history of stuttering. Speech therapy can help make the speech more fluent or smooth, and can help the child feel better about the stuttering.

    1 Thanks
  • Bachelor of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (B.A.S.L.P)
    Speech Therapist
    1. Speak in your normal voice with appropriate loudness
    2. Limit vocal use when ill.
    3. Take frequent breaks during voice use for extended periods.
    4. Maintain good posture and breathe through your nose while not speaking.
    5. Do not smoke & avoid alcohol intake.
    6. Do not sing or mimic natural sounds or animal cries to train your voice
    7 Thanks
  • Master of Hospital Administration, Bachelor of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (B.A.S.L.P)
    Speech Therapist
    What is stuttering?

    Stuttering affects the fluency of speech. It begins during childhood and, in some cases, lasts throughout life. The disorder is characterized by disruptions in the production of speech sounds, also called" disfluencies" most people produce brief disfluencies from time to time. For instance, some words are repeated and others are preceded by" um" or" uh" disfluencies are not necessarily a problem; however, they can impede communication when a person produces too many of them.

    In most cases, stuttering has an impact on at least some daily activities. The specific activities that a person finds challenging to perform vary across individuals. For some people, communication difficulties only happen during specific activities, for example, talking on the telephone or talking before large groups. For most others, however, communication difficulties occur across a number of activities at home, school, or work. Some people may limit their participation in certain activities. Such" participation restrictions" often occur because the person is concerned about how others might react to disfluent speech. Other people may try to hide their disfluent speech from others by rearranging the words in their sentence (circumlocution), pretending to forget what they wanted to say, or declining to speak. Other people may find that they are excluded from participating in certain activities because of stuttering. Clearly, the impact of stuttering on daily life can be affected by how the person and others react to the disorder.

    What are signs and symptoms of stuttering?

    Stuttered speech often includes repetitions of words or parts of words, as well as prolongations of speech sounds. These disfluencies occur more often in persons who stutter than they do in the general population. Some people who stutter appear very tense or" out of breath" when talking. Speech may become completely stopped or blocked. Blocked is when the mouth is positioned to say a sound, sometimes for several seconds, with little or no sound forthcoming. After some effort, the person may complete the word. Interjections such as" um" or" like" can occur, as well, particularly when they contain repeated (" u- um- um") or prolonged (" uuuum") speech sounds or when they are used intentionally to delay the initiation of a word the speaker expects to" get stuck on"

    Some examples of stuttering include:

    " w- w- w- where are you going" (part-word repetition: the person is having difficulty moving from the" w" in" where" to the remaining sounds in the word. On the fourth attempt, he successfully completes the word.)
    " ssss ave me a seat" (sound prolongation: the person is having difficulty moving from the" s" in" save" to the remaining sounds in the word. He continues to say the" s" sound until he is able to complete the word.)
    " i'll meet you - um um you know like - around six o'clock" (a series of interjections: the person expects to have difficulty smoothly joining the word" you" with the word" around" in response to the anticipated difficulty, he produces several interjections until he is able to say the word" around" smoothly.)
    How is stuttering diagnosed?

    Identifying stuttering in an individual's speech would seem like an easy task. Disfluencies often" stand out" and disrupt a person's communication. Listeners can usually detect when a person is stuttering. At the same time, however, stuttering can affect more than just a person's observable speech. Some characteristics of stuttered speech are not as easy for listeners to detect. As a result, diagnosing stuttering requires the skills of a certified speech-language pathologist (slp).

    During an evaluation, an slp will note the number and types of speech disfluencies a person produces in various situations. The slp will also assess the ways in which the person reacts to and copes with disfluencies. The slp may also gather information about factors such as teasing that may make the problem worse. A variety of other assessments (e. G, speech rate, language skills) may be completed as well, depending upon the person's age and history. Information about the person is then analyzed to determine whether a fluency disorder exists. If so, the extent to which it affects the ability to perform and participate in daily activities is determined.

    For young children, it is important to predict whether the stuttering is likely to continue. An evaluation consists of a series of tests, observations, and interviews designed to estimate the child's risk for continuing to stutter. Although there is some disagreement among slps about which risk factors are most important to consider, factors that are noted by many specialists include the following:

    A family history of stuttering
    Stuttering that has continued for 6 months or longer
    Presence of other speech or language disorders
    Strong fears or concerns about stuttering on the part of the child or the family
    No single factor can be used to predict whether a child will continue to stutter. The combination of these factors can help slps determine whether treatment is indicated.

    For older children and adults, the question of whether stuttering is likely to continue is somewhat less important, because the stuttering has continued at least long enough for it to become a problem in the person's daily life. For these individuals, an evaluation consists of tests, observations, and interviews that are designed to assess the overall severity of the disorder. In addition, the impact the disorder has on the person's ability to communicate and participate appropriately in daily activities is evaluated. Information from the evaluation is then used to develop a specific treatment program, one that is designed to:

    Help the individual speak more fluently,
    Communicate more effectively, and
    Participate more fully in life activities.
    What treatments are available for stuttering?

    Most treatment programs for people who stutter are" behavioral" they are designed to teach the person specific skills or behaviors that lead to improved oral communication. For instance, many slps teach people who stutter to control and/or monitor the rate at which they speak. In addition, people may learn to start saying words in a slightly slower and less physically tense manner. They may also learn to control or monitor their breathing. When learning to control speech rate, people often begin by practicing smooth, fluent speech at rates that are much slower than typical speech, using short phrases and sentences. Over time, people learn to produce smooth speech at faster rates, in longer sentences, and in more challenging situations until speech sounds both fluent and natural" follow-up" or" maintenance" sessions are often necessary after completion of formal intervention to prevent relapse.
    1 Thanks
  • Master of Speech Language Pathology
    Speech Therapist
    Its often heard in clinical practice of speech language pathologists and other medical professions about the negative opinions about a/many speech language pathologist (s).

    Not many look at the reasons for these disconnections from a service provider and the customer. Most of the efforts to understand this quote two main reasons

    Economical constraints and
    Unavailability of speech language pathologist (slp).

    However, there are more reasons both sides. But its up to you to decide to waste your time reasoning or utilize best the available services.

    To the care takers:

    He/she is your kid, but not the speech pathologist's - being a parent, your role is central in helping the slp to help you to help your kid.
    You need to communicate whats your needs are to the slp. They will tell you if its possible or not. You can ask questions till your doubts are cleared.
    Don't be vague in your expectations. It will only hurt you when slp's goals are no way matching your because your slp is working step by step while you are already thinking about the end bypassing the whole process. Ask what can be expected or what is practical.
    Slp can not produce results over night, unless he/she is a god or magician.
    Each speech pathologist targets the same skills in their own way. Don't impose things by comparing two slps. It can not be measured in mg. In ones comfort zone, efficiency is maximum.
    Consistently attend the therapy and then there is chance of improving your understanding about the improvement or reasons if there is no improvements.
    Knowledge is good. Share it but not compare.
    And more

    Note: more suggestions may be updated with feedback.
  • CCT, FRCPCH , MRCPCH, Diploma in Child Health (DCH), MBBS
    Delayed Speech: Can it be autism?

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a range of complex neurodevelopment disorders, characterized by social impairments, communication difficulties, and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behaviour. Males are four times more likely to have an ASD than females. A recent study in US found 1 in 68 children suffering from autism.
    What are some common signs of autism?

    The hall feature of ASD is impaired social interaction. As early as infancy, a baby with ASD may be unresponsive to people or focus intently on one item to the exclusion of others for long periods of time. A child with ASD may appear to develop normally and then withdraw and become indifferent to social engagement.

    Children with an ASD may fail to respond to their names and often avoid eye contact with other people. They have difficulty interpreting what others are thinking or feeling because they can’t understand social cues, such as tone of voice or facial expressions, and don’t watch other people’s faces for clues about appropriate behaviour. They lack empathy.

    Many children with an ASD engage in repetitive movements such as rocking, or self-abusive behaviour such as biting or head-banging. They also tend to start speaking later than other children. Children with an ASD don’t know how to play interactively with other children. Some speak in a sing-song voice about a narrow range of favourite topics, with little regard for the interests of the person to whom they are speaking.

    Children with characteristics of an ASD may have co-occurring conditions, including Fragile X syndrome (which causes mental retardation), tuberous sclerosis, epileptic seizures, Tourette syndrome, learning disabilities, and attention deficit disorder. About 20 to 30 percent of children with an ASD develop epilepsy by the time they reach adulthood.
    How is autism diagnosed?

    Very early indicators that require evaluation by an expert include:
    • no babbling or pointing by age 1
    • no single words by 16 months or two-word phrases by age 2
    • no response to name
    • loss of language or social skills
    • poor eye contact
    • excessive lining up of toys or objects
    • No smiling or social responsiveness.

    If you find any of these features in your child, please consult the local pediatrician or child neurologist if available who can assess your child in detail. There is no single blood test to diagnose autism. However, the doctor needs to look into certain disorders in which children have similar features or having features of autism in addition to other signs of that disorder. E.g. Tuber sclerosis, Landau-kleffner syndrome (a form of Epilpesy), other childhood epilepsies, some metabolic and genetic disease. So your doctor may do some blood test, hearing assessment, EEG, etc. depending upon the presenting features and assessment.

    What role does inheritance play?

    Twin and family studies strongly suggest that some people have a genetic predisposition to autism. Identical twin studies show that if one twin is affected, there is up to a 90 percent chance the other twin will be affected. In families with one child with ASD, the risk of having a second child with the disorder is approximately 5 percent, or one in 20. This is greater than the risk for the general population.

    Do symptoms of autism change over time?
    For many children, symptoms improve with treatment and with age. Children whose language skills regress early in life (before the age of 3) appear to have a higher than normal risk of developing epilepsy or seizure-like brain activity. During adolescence, some children with an ASD may become depressed or experience behavioural problems, and their treatment may need some modification as they transition to adulthood. People with an ASD usually continue to need services and supports as they get older, but many are able to work successfully and live independently or within a supportive environment.

    How is autism managed?

    There is no cure for ASDs. However, it is important to diagnose it early and look for associated conditions like ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactive disorder), Epilepsy, sleep disorders, etc. Earlier is intervention, better is the outcome. Therapies and behavioral interventions are designed to remedy specific symptoms and can bring about substantial improvement. The ideal treatment plan coordinates therapies and interventions that meet the specific needs of individual children.

    Educational/behavioural interventions: Therapists use highly structured and intensive skill-oriented training sessions to help children develop social and language skills, such as Applied Behavioural Analysis. Family counselling for the parents and siblings of children with an ASD often helps families cope with the particular challenges of living with a child with an ASD.
    Medications: Doctors may prescribe medications for treatment of specific autism-related symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Antipsychotic medications are used to treat severe behavioural problems. Seizures can be treated with one or more anticonvulsant drugs. Medication used to treat people with attention deficit disorder can be used effectively to help decrease impulsivity and hyperactivity.
    Other therapies: There are a number of controversial therapies or interventions available, but few, if any, are supported by scientific studies. Parents should use caution before adopting any unproven treatments. Although dietary interventions have been helpful in some children, parents should be careful that their child’s nutritional status is carefully followed.

    Conclusion: Autism is seen commonly now a day. The main features are delayed speech, poor eye contact and social interaction and restricted interest with repetitive behaviour. Parents and physician should aware of its early symptoms so that early intervention can be started.

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