Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Ms. Rachna Mishra - Psychologist, Delhi

Ms. Rachna Mishra

91 (163 ratings)
M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in ...

Psychologist, Delhi

5 Years Experience  ·  600 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
Ms. Rachna Mishra 91% (163 ratings) M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychothe... Psychologist, Delhi
5 Years Experience  ·  600 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services
Reviews

Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Ms. Rachna Mishra
She has helped numerous patients in her 4 years of experience as a Psychologist. She is a qualified M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy. Don?t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Ms. Rachna Mishra on .com.

.com has a number of highly qualified Psychologists in India. You will find Psychologists with more than 43 years of experience on .com. You can find Psychologists online in Group-6 sector-11, rohini and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
M.Sc - Applied Psychology - ignou - 2012
MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy - ignou - 2013
PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy - IGNOU - 2016
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Indian Association for Clinical Psychologists
Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI)
indian association for counselling psychologist

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Ms. Rachna Mishra

  4.6  (163 ratings)
600 at clinic
...more

Mind Healer

LIG Flat E-2/249Delhi Get Directions
  4.6  (163 ratings)
600 at clinic
...more
View All

Consult Online

Text Consult
Send multiple messages/attachments. Get first response within 6 hours.
7 days validity ₹300 online
Consult Now
Phone Consult
Schedule for your preferred date/time
20 minutes call duration ₹400 online
Consult Now
Video Consult
Schedule for your preferred date/time
15 minutes call duration ₹500 online
Consult Now

Health Packages

ENQUIRE
21 Days validity  •  Medicines included
₹3000
ENQUIRE
21 Days validity  •  Medicines included
₹2500
ENQUIRE
21 Days validity  •  Medicines included
₹5000
ENQUIRE
21 Days validity  •  Medicines included
₹5000

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Ms. Rachna Mishra

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Patient Review Highlights

"Inspiring" 8 reviews "Very helpful" 35 reviews "Helped me impr..." 3 reviews "knowledgeable" 18 reviews "Caring" 6 reviews "Well-reasoned" 4 reviews "Sensible" 3 reviews "Professional" 3 reviews "Nurturing" 2 reviews "Saved my life" 3 reviews "Practical" 3 reviews "Thorough" 3 reviews

Reviews

Popular
All Reviews
View More
View All Reviews

Feed

How to overcome with major depression? Help me out? I am suffering from very heavy depression. How to get rid of this.

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
How to overcome with major depression? Help me out? I am suffering from very heavy depression. How to get rid of this.
Hello lybrate-user. Depression is a tough thing. I want to share with you some of my strategies I developed and wrote about to overcome depression without medication. 1.Art. Creating art I found to be very therapeutic. I would create paintings in my early stage of therapy to release my emotions and express what I was thinking. At the end of the process I had produced a piece of work that now sits on my parents mantel piece and helps me remember the time when I overcame great difficulties. 2.Get rest. Sleeping, particularly in the early stages of depression is necessary for your mind to heal. When I first fell ill I was sleeping a lot, for around about 3 weeks. Sleeping has been scientifically proven to have great benefit and also to help you recover from your ordeal. I wrote a blog about this a while ago to try and help give more clarity on this. The importance of sleeping when healing from depression 3.Keep a journey journal. Every day, when you are awake, try to write how you are feeling, no matter how bad it may seem. Writing it down helps to get it out of your head and also identify when things are not as bad as you previously thought. Some days will be better than others and as you progress through your journey, eventually, you will see a real difference until you no longer need to write any more in your journal. I still keep my journals I wrote in and when I look back at them, I see just how far I have come to where I am today. 5 reasons why you should consider keeping a 'Journey Journal' 4.Set goals, wild crazy goals as well as achievable ‘realist’ ones. All people are goal orientated, fact. No matter what it is, it can be meeting a perfect partner, having large groups of friends, being a great artist, running your own business, settin a meal plan or simply forcing yourself to get out of bed in the morning at a certain time. These are all goals! I encourage you to get a piece of paper (or in the back of your journal) and write out 10 different goals you’d like to achieve. If you are struggling to get up in the morning before 9 am say, maybe one of your goals can be to try to get up for 8: 30 am. Possibly another goal might be to get a shower every day if you have stopped doing that. These small goals can work you towards bigger ones. It is important to dream big too so set your biggest dream goal in action too! So imagine your wildest dream, do you want to be a millionaire? Then set it as a goal. It is achievable but the goal is the first step on the journey towards it. I have also wrote a blog about goal setting here:- The importance of goal setting for depression 5.Exercise. As hard as it may seem, do push yourself to exercise. This should be one of your top goals. Exercising releases natural endorphins and the good news is, you don’t have to go the gym either! You can simply go the park for a long walk (the double effect of being in nature will be of great benefit to you ), or you can use a computer such as the wii fit or xbox 360 with kinect to train yourself at home. Actually I used a combination of the wii fit and walking the family dog on long walks to help stimulate serotonin release in my brain naturally and it did help, plus I was starting to see a difference in my weight and body shape which gave me some more confidence and hope. 9 Reasons why regular exercise is good for depression - Battle of Mind Blog 6.Watch motivational videos and films. When I was going through difficulties and I found it hard to motivate myself I would watch motivational videos. There was one in particular that was quite powerful to me about gladiator and how you achieve a good life and one you can be proud of when you look back. In fact, with your question this may well be of benefit for you to watch as well:- Gladiator mindset and inspiration to overcome pain and adversity 7.Laugh even when you don’t want to. Watch your favourite comedians, things that you know are funny to you. Even force yourself to smile for at least 30 seconds, when you smile you can’t feel sad and it naturally lifts you! Try it now, go on! See how you feel after smiling that long!:) Meditate. I can’t state enough how important meditation is for a peaceful mind. I use guided meditations in an app. Simply look for one in your chosen app store, there are plenty of free versions. It is reaaaally good and with regular practice you will find some peace of mind. 8.Assess Relationships. Are all your relationships healthy? Not just love relationships but also friendships? It is sometimes important to detach from people who are causing you distress as sometimes letting go is not only beneficial for you but also to the person you are letting go off. 9.Seek A Therapy. Lastly but not least, you really need to try different therapies alongside exercising, goal setting, sleeping well and finding motivation. I am not ashamed to say that I have tried over six different therapies before I found the one that worked well for me. For me personally I found hypnotherapy to be of great help but maybe speak to your GP before you access a specialist to see if that therapy would be suitable for you. Seek a therapy - helping you find a local therapist easily Thank YOu All The BEst.
4 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am suffering from depression and anxiety attack on the way you are w g ram public school and I will have the best for me.

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
I am suffering from depression and anxiety attack on the way you are w g ram public school and I will have the best f...
Hie lybrate-user, I have always wondered about this question: What is it that makes me happy? Is it good times spent with friends? Is it performance at work? Is it self awareness? What is it? I created a simple mind map, and started splitting a few things randomly, then I structured them a little, and created a framework. Belief, performance, measurement, results, anticipation, anxiety, happiness Here is how things happen: You always have a rough belief system in your mind. Your beliefs can be weak, or strong. Sometimes very strong. You might believe in yourself, or in things told by others, or you might believe in someone else. Same way, you can have acquired skills, and you can split your skills as ~ what you can do, vs what you are expected to do. I am only giving you a framework. You can always choose to write down whatever you like on a paper just like this. The framework is, that everything in our lives can be split into three ways: What you think, believe, have, can get, etc. What others think, believe, have, can get about you or themselves. What the reality is or where it can go in time if efforts are put towards improvements. Also note, that everything affects everything else. For example, the more skills you have, the stronger your beliefs in something can be. The stronger your beliefs are, the more others might believe in you. The more others believe in you, the more they can help you out. The more they help you, the better your results can look and so on. Each and everything that affects one another can take a positive or a negative trend over time. When we put efforts onto something, you get some results. Again, everything is affected: [Beliefs, attitudes, results, skills, results…] everything! Here is what happiness is: Happiness is simply an inverse of a summation of all the deltas you can put together. Lets think about it with a few examples (they are made up, but I have felt and experienced them): When I did something great, I wasn’t expecting a prize, but my boss gave me one: I got happy! When I did something great, but no one thanked me. I felt tiredness and depression. When I believed in something that was true, but others didn’t it made me anxious. Then I put more efforts to show others what I believed in and why. They saw a clearer picture and got convinced - I got happy. When my boss asked me to do a task, and I could not do it the way he expected - he got angry, and I got depressed. When my boss asked me to train someone. I trained them exceeding expectations - they got happy, my boss got happy, so I got happy! This extends to personal life, not just professional life: I made a sandwich for my friend. He was not even expecting one. He got happy, so I got happy. My friend invited me to his party, but I got late. He got anxious, so I got anxious. I wasn’t anticipating my friends to visit, but they visited me during vacations - they got happy, I got happy. This extends to anticipation on just about anything: We aren’t taught how to manage our emotions in life and we live our lives at the tail end of them. In order to be able to manage your state effectively, you will have to practice this. It’s like being in a building burning down and asking “how do I use the fire extinguisher? – the more experience you have with using the fire extinguisher before the fire, the better off you will be at using it if there is a fire. To get good at this, you will need to practice in your spare time before you’re in the moment. Initially while you are learning this, there will be times where it won’t make any sense, the worst thing you can do is to give up. 1. The ‘Do it Anyway’ approach to dealing with fear Surprisingly this is the most common advice to dealing with social anxiety, it’s also the most controversial in my opinion. For smaller tasks you do that have fear, this advice will work fine. For larger more ‘paralysing’ fear, this approach is pure hell to watch people go through. As adults we become slightly insensitive to the emotions and experiences that have happened to us in childhood. Most people pass them off as ‘no big deal’, but as adults we forget the complexity of emotions and how they can change the way a child sees the world. If you’ve ever seen a child get lost in the supermarket, it’s pure hell for them because children don’t know that they will get through it, and they don’t know how to see the situation from a larger perspective. The more I practise hypnosis, the more sensitive I become to how fragile people’s realities really are. When people think about walking over and talking to somebody and they become paralysed, they are dealing with a lifetime of experience that has proved that people are unpleasant to talk to. As adults we know this is not true, but our belief system says otherwise. I’ll give you an extreme example to show you why this method is ineffective. Post Traumatic Stress is an anxiety disorder that happens from a traumatic experience like a car crash, rape, or returning home from war. Most people who go through a traumatic event will display the same symptoms as somebody with PTSD, but will fade over time. Somebody with PTSD will constantly re-experience the detail throughout their day and will be plagued by anxiety. The soldier will keep playing the graphic details of bullets flying everywhere and seeing his friends dying. By telling somebody to ‘deal with it’ they are effectively telling the soldier to rerun through the battle, and watch it over and over again. This is why this method is painful to watch people go through. It’s like being forced to watch an intense horror movie over and over again in a cinema. I’ve used PTSD as an extreme example because it illustrates the point clearly. Social anxiety may not be as intense as PTSD but because people are replaying a life’s worth of unsuccessful interactions with people over and over again it’s easy to understand why people have so much fear about being social. This is why people using this method to deal with their fear are constantly struggling with motivational issues and create elaborate excuses about not doing the task. 2. Reframe the experience from anxiety to excitement There’s a lot of truth to this method, the only difference between a sensation and an emotion is that an emotion is a sensation with a thought attached to it, either good or bad. We make a decision and judge whether it’s good or bad, and this is influenced off our past experiences. In the movie Big Daddy, Adam Sandler has to baby sit his friend’s kid. There’s a scene where the kid is on a school excursion and he goes to the bathroom and he wets his pants. The kid is hiding in the bathroom worried about what will happen when he walks outside dreading the torment that will come from his peers. To help the boy, Adam’s character walks into the bathroom, splashes water on his pants and walks outside with him. They boy is empowered because he isn’t the only person any more. If we wet ourselves in public, it could be seen as embarrassing, or it could be seen as comedic moment that has brought a smile to a crowd of people. The emotions fear and excitement are indistinguishable, the only difference between anxiety and excitement is the way we look at it. It’s the same as pessimism vs optimism. This is a useful way of looking at the physical energy and the experiences in life and it’s a great way to add positive resources into negative events. When people experience an intense rush of physical energy in their body, they still need a way of burning it off. This will be the next article I’ll be writing about. 3. Mindfulness Mindfulness is a type of meditation that has been around for about 3000 years and extends from key Buddhist principles. Mindfulness has been covered in the media quite a bit, Olympians have used it to stay motivated, Steve Job was an active practitioner of mindfulness, Fortune 500 companies in the US have been developing their ownMindfulness programs because of the productivity increase. Mindful meditation has been described as the ‘sit and observe’ meditation, it involves paying attention to the sensations that are happening around you in a given moment, rather than being on autopilot. When people experience fear, they do an internal search in their body and check what the emotion is and they check each part of their body for the tension and the stiffness and that is what they pay attention to. There is an interesting phenomenon known as The Law of Attention. Whatever we focus our attention on will grow, and we tend to find things that we look for. If you’re riding a bike and you see a rock in front of you, you end up hitting it because that’s what your attention has zoned in on, and you forget about all the space around the rock where you can redirect the bike to. The same thing happens when people have fear, they forget about all the comfort in other areas of their body (like their feet), if you were to focus on that comfort as a guide and realise that the anxiety will end soon. For people who are not used to pushing through fear or anxiety, they get caught up “oh no, I have it again” and they let it paralyse them. When people are doing a task, they do a quick internal check inside their body and basically ask them self “what emotion do I have” and when they notice the fear, they freak out and that causes more fear. With mindfulness, you can notice the fear, and pay attention to a different sensation inside the body, or just observe the fear in your body. Mindfulness is also the most scientifically researched type of meditation. This is of interest to us because it has been shown to decrease the size of the amygdala, the part of the brain that switches on fear. As the amygdala shrinks, the GABA fibers that link to the pre frontal cortex become thicker and give you increased control of awareness and concentration and this is what teaches a you to be more focused on the present moment, rather than caught up in thoughts about the past or worries about the future This is where we start seeing real change, if you do mindfulness for 20 minutes a day, you will see dramatic improvements in your life, you will be happier, you will be able to think clearer and you will be more creative. Mindfulness is extremely useful for dealing with situations where you have fear. 4. Hypnosis Most people are sceptical about hypnosis – that’s not the case, here is the scientific proof that hypnosis works and actually changes the brain. There are two ways to go about achieving results with hypnosis, self hypnosis or seeing a hypnotherapist. Both will get you the same results, the only difference is that self hypnosis will take longer because you have to learn hypnosis, and you have to learn therapy or understand how to work with emotional issues like failure, guilt and anger and fear. Hypnosis is basically mindfulness on steroids and you will achieve results much faster than any other method. Hypnosis combines the attentional manoeuvres of mindfulness and the therapeutic aspects allow you to remove the pain and doubts from your past experiences. This means your perception of events changes from pain to pleasure, as motivation is automatically built into the process. People receive an emotional pay off from being social, studies have shown that people who socialise regularly are happier, studies have also shown that people who buy experiences are happier than people who buy things. The motivational pay off occurs by completing the task. If you go to a party, the reward is the fun times and stories you create, if it’s walking up to a stranger on the street, you might end up having a date with them. Hypnosis will allow you to cheat and create reference experiences where you don’t have any yet. There is a process called Deep Trance Identification, which is a specific mental rehearsal of a task or event that primes your mind for success as it allows you to create certainty in situations that are unexpected or dealing with ‘the worst situation possible’. Using Deep Trance Identification you can build the muscle memory that’s required to perform each task. When people talk about high performance states, they normally describe the process as ‘happening automatically’ or ‘happening without thinking’ – this is basically describing the process of trance, which is exactly what you do with hypnosis. When you enter a trance, your behaviour switches to automatic mode and you complete the task. A common example is when you’re out for dinner with friends, you’re able to create an engaging conversation between the two of you and you’re able to eat and manipulate cutlery without getting food all over yourself, and you don’t need to think about things you’re doing, it all just seems to flow naturally and easily. What to do next Everybody talks about the first step to success happening within the mind, but it’s actually the biggest thing people neglect when it comes to personal development, or do incorrectly. People mistake affirmations and quotes with beautiful scenery as the tools required for powerful changes in their life. Real success happens from creating resilience inside yourself, so that you can handle any situation. Resilience comes from working through the lies you tell yourself about your fears, about the power you perceive to be in other people and in your ability to make decisions for yourself. Thank YOu All The Best.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 13 year old girl. I have anger and tension. I also have fear in exam and school. I have worm in my stomach also. Can worm cause tension, anger and fear.

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
1.Keep all of your notes and schoolwork organized. Being disorganized can make anxiety much worse. You'll start to panic because you can't find that one page of notes you need to know, and then lose time looking for it instead of studying. To avoid this problem, keep all of your schoolwork neat and organized. That way, you'll be able to find everything you need and spend the maximum amount of time studying. Keep all of your notes for a certain class in one notebook, so everything for that class is in one place. Also make sure to date the page every time you take notes. If you take notes on your computer, keep your notes, assignments, and any study aids in separate folders for each class, and date all of your notes. Designate a folder for any loose material you have for a class. Handouts, essays, homework assignments, and past tests can go in here so you can find them easily when you need them. Take breaks while studying. Although you should study as much as you need to, it is possible to overdo it. Spending every minute of the day studying will wreak havoc on your nerves and make anxiety worse. Be sure to factor breaks into your study schedule. Every hour or two you should take a break. Any activities will do. Try watching TV, going for a walk, taking a nap—whatever you have to do. This will rest your brain and you can come back to your studies refreshed and ready to continue. Advertisement Part Two Reducing Anxiety Physically 1Look for physical symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety is not only an emotional state. It produces physical symptoms that you can identify if you know what to look for. If you experience any of the following symptoms when studying or thinking about a test, this would be a tell tale sign that you're feeling anxiety. You can then take steps to alleviate symptoms. Headaches.Dry mouth. Rapid heartbeat. Usually a heart rate above 100 beats per minute characterizes a rapid heartbeat. Sweating.Shortness of breath. Light-headedness. Extreme body temperature, either excessively hot or cold. Gastrointestinal discomfort. This can be characterized by nausea, diarrhea, bloating, and abdominal pain. Stay active. Exercise and physical activity are great ways to reduce anxiety. Physical activity releases endorphins that will elevate your mood. It will also distract your mind from the test and studying, so your brain will have a chance to relax and refresh itself. Any number of physical activities will have a beneficial affect on your anxiety. They include, but certainly aren't limited to: Going to the gym. Taking a walk. Doing housework. Riding your bike. Working outside. Playing sports. Eat proper meals regularly. Oftentimes people suffering from anxiety have trouble eating and skip meals. This is a mistake. Hunger can make your anxiety worse. It will also starve your brain of nutrients and you won't be able to focus. Eat at least three balanced meals every day to keep your strength up. Make sure your meals are nutritious. Whole grain products, fruits, vegetables, and lean proteins are best because they will provide you with a sustained release of energy that will carry you through your study session. Avoid sugary foods and drinks. Not only are these bad for your health, but the spike in your blood sugar will make you jittery, which could increase your anxiety. Also, the energy high will come with a crash before too long, and you won't be able to study effectively anymore. Get plenty of sleep. Sleep deprivation is another cause of anxiety. Commit to getting a full 8 hours of sleep every night. This will ensure that your brain has been properly rested and you can start studying with a fresh mind. Stretch your muscles. Anxiety often causes muscles to tense up, particularly those in the upper back and neck. This will cause pain and discomfort, inhibiting your ability to concentrate. During your breaks, make sure you stretch and massage any muscles that feel tight. Not only will this give you physical relief, but the action of stretching will help reduce your anxiety. Try meditation. Meditation is designed to relax your body and mind, so it is great for people suffering from anxiety. If you're feeling anxious preparing for a test, schedule in some meditation time. Avoid people who generate anxiety when studying. You might have certain friends or acquaintances who also suffer from test anxiety and always vocalize their fears. This doesn't mean you can't be friends with them, but it might be best to avoid them while you're trying to study. You might be making a good effort to curb your own anxiety, and allowing their negative thoughts to overcome you could set you back. Part Three Think about your cognitive state. Anxiety often impairs concentration and causes sufferers to simply blank out. If you're trying to study but just can't bring yourself to focus, you could be suffering from anxiety. Procrastination is also a symptom, since avoidance of a problem is a defense mechanism. If you notice these symptoms, it is time to take action and work on your thought processes. Analyze your thought patterns. Often when people suffer from anxiety, they focus on overwhelmingly negative thoughts. You may say to yourself "I'm definitely going to fail this test, or "If I fail this test my life is over. These thinking traps are a symptom of anxiety, as well as a cause of greater anxiety. If you find yourself thinking this way about a test, you can take some steps to address and remedy those thoughts Isolate and analyze negative thoughts. When a negative thought enters your head, stop what you're doing and think about it. By breaking down negative thoughts, you can find that most of them are unrealistic, and then replace them with more positive thoughts. Think about whether this thought is logical. For example, you think "If I fail this test, my life is over. Is that really true? In almost all situations, no, it's not true. There is no logical way a test will result in your life ending, making this an unrealistic fear. Put negative thoughts in perspective. When many negative thoughts are put in real-world perspective, they don't seem so serious. For example, you're convinced that you will fail the biology test tomorrow. But you've gotten good grades on every biology test this semester so far. Past experience is on your side here. This new perspective makes your fear seem more unlikely, since you've already established that you're good at biology. 5Replace illogical thoughts with logical ones. Once you've established that a fear is illogical, you can work on replacing it with a more balanced and logical thought. This will bring your mind back to reality and help break down illogical fears. Once you've isolated the thought that "I will definitely fail this test tomorrow, replace it with, "I've been studying all week, I know this material, and it's within my power to do well on this test. This new pattern of thinking breaks down your fear that was based on nothing, and replaces it with a new thought that is rooted in reality. Even if you can't get past the idea that you will fail tomorrow's test, you can use logic to help you remain calm by reminding yourself that a failed exam doesn't mean you will fail the class. Remind yourself that you may even have other options, such as investigating extra credit or asking to re-take the exam. Use positive self-statements. When people suffer from anxiety, they usually use negative self-statements like "I'm stupid, or "I'm worthless. These kinds of statements can easily cause your anxiety to progress into depression and threaten your overall mental health. Just like you replaced your illogical fears with logical thoughts, replace negative statements with positive ones. Make an effort to tell yourself "I'm smart, "I can do this, or "Everything will be okay. That way you can cut negative statements out of your thinking and improve your happiness and mental health. Statements such as "I'm stupid" or "I'm worthless" are not only unhelpful, they're untrue because they summarize you based on one observation. For example, if you've performed poorly on your calculus quizzes so far, you might think "I'm a loser. This is an emotional overstatement. Try to think about the facts instead: You just happen to be performing poorly on calculus quizzes. This says nothing about who you are as a person, or your ability in other areas. For worms problem you can contact your family physician. THANK YOU ALL THE BEST.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

For e.g.I lost somebody close last year and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to may self all that time may help me.

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
For e.g.I lost somebody close last year and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to may self all that ti...
Hello Rajesh........... Nothing dies. Death is transformation. You see, its a change. Whole organism exists but not the way as before. The thought of loss generates stress. When I think, I lost something, its painful. Don't create barriers for tears. But don't get lost in pain. Feel their transition. They have moved into the unborn state. Nothing becomes “not” existing. They have been silenced. Sounds are no more. You don't see or hear them. When you have lot of thoughts about them, close your eyes, meditate, breath, relax and be in that silence. Distractions won't work.Distracting ourselves from thoughts, memories or feelings is troublesome. In that pursuit, more of same are pushed into consciousness. Instead of peace, wholeness is agitated. We run in all directions and get nowhere. The best way to overcome the pain is to give it time and create a logical philosophy that can support your mind to cope with the pain and sorrow. Be it losing a close person by the death or by losing a relationship. Just to help you , I am providing you with one philosophy-”what ever has come in existence, has to come to an end. By death or by separation. Nothing in this world is for ever. ” The thumb rule is to keep yourself occupied as much as you can. You must find meaningful engagement. While facing an emotional trauma, TRY never to be lonely. Spend as much time as you can in good company. Read a lot of good books that can create a philosophical and logical background to let your mind soothe the emotional trauma Learn to medicate or get engaged in spiritual or religious activities Do some social work BELIEVE me nothing works better than sharing the pain of others to reduce your own pain. If the trauma is still there even after 3 months , never hesitate to take professional help. Happy living Thank You All the Best
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My board exams are there I am felling very stress. And I have so much burden on my head. It is 10 it's to hard for me to do.

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
My board exams are there I am felling very stress. And I have so much burden on my head. It is 10 it's to hard for me...
Hello Lybrate User. Stress is a hidden enemy with a constant capacity to wrack havoc on your body and mind. Its actions are insidious, slow but powerful. The consequences can be debilitating on your physical and mental wellbeing. This is even more relevant today, in our extremely complex civilized society where stress triggers are automated by our rushed living. After more then 10 years battling the consequences of extreme stress and testing numerous techniques I can give you 21 ways to manage stress. Just be disciplined about it and apply them constantly. You will be amazed by the results. 1. Go to sleep early and get up early. This is a powerful routine that will manage your stress hormones and give you a fresh start every day. 2. Start a morning routine. Dedicate just 20 minutes every morning to yourself, to clear your mind and thoughts and prepare for the journey ahead. My routine consists of 10 minutes meditation, a cocktail of green and black tea follow by a green shake, and writing a few thoughts in my journal 3. Improve your diet. This is essential. Eat better, whole foods at regular intervals throughout the day; eat slowly, chew your food and don’t drink your calories. 4. Drink plenty of water every day, throughout the day. You should aim for at least 2 liters. 5. Stay away from coffee and smoking. Those habits will interfere with your adrenaline and cortisol levels, increasing stress and anxiety. 6. Improve your sleep. You want to improve not just your sleep quantity but your sleep quality also. Make sure your bedroom has the right temperature for sleep, the air is clean and that you keep your phone and laptop in another room. 7. Make time to relax throughout the day. Consciously relax every morning through prayer and meditation. Also take a break in the afternoon and find at least half an hour of private time in the evening just to relax. 8. Breathe! Incorrect breathing patterns interfere with your O2-CO2 balance and can trigger stress response, anxiety and panic attacks. Try to breathe through your abdomen, not your chest, and train yourself to slowly breathe in and extend your exhalations. Avoid hyperventilation 9. Reduce your sitting time. If you have a desk job, mindfully remind yourself to stand up and walk for at least five minutes every hour. 10. Go for a walk. Walking for 15 minutes daily, preferably in a park has been shown to reduce stress, improve mood and increase stamina. 11. Try a technology detox every week. Prolonged smartphone using has been linked to increased stress so try to have a technology fast. Pick a day of the week and just don’t use your phone or tablet. The world won’t stop and you will feel better the next day 12. Drink a morning vitamin shake. I use almond milk, yoghurt, green powder, banana, vegan protein, flaxseeds and chia seeds 13. Find a hobby and stick to it. I used art which kept me busy in a meaningful and distressful way 14. Smile more and find reasons to be optimistic. Every day when I write in my journal or my to do list I star by drawing a smiley face. That is how I program my brain for a optimistic view of things 15. Manage rumination and mind chatter. Try to stop inner mind dialogues and meaningless mind chatter 16. Practice mindfulness. I do it when eating, when walking, when breathing 17. Exercise more. Working out has been linked by numerous studies to improved mood, happiness and less stress. Take up an exercise routine, run, join a gym or just walk every day 18. Try an evening ritual. Mine consist of taking a bath while listening to relaxing music. Simple yet effective 19. Read more and watch TV less. This will unwind your racing mind and automatically calm your body 20. Make social life a habit. This will reduce cortisol levels to a healthy dose and improve your mood while spending a quality time with friends 21. Snack on healthy food. No ice-cream or cake but instead try a handful of nuts, a yoghurt or an apple. Try all these activities and stay happy in your life thank you All the Best.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

5 Don ts When Your ADHD Child Is Upset or Angry

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi

Parents dread having to deal with meltdowns. However, parents of children with ADHD may face more meltdowns than other parents.

Children with ADHD are more prone to meltdowns for a number of reasons. Often their brain circuitry for emotional regulation is dysfunctional in which it takes less to trigger an anger episode that lasts for a longer periods of time than other children. This is the result of faulty wiring. Working with them on relaxation techniques like taking deep breaths or counting to ten at the first sign of being upset can help. It is important for them to practice these when they are calm.

These kids often aren’t fully tuned in to what is going on around them and miss important information that causes them to misinterpret a situation and then react to what they think is going on rather than what really happened. If you are having a discussion with your child, pause frequently to make sure they are getting your point. Ask questions to make sure they understand and encourage them to ask you questions as well.

Some ADHD kids lack the ability to be flexible causing them to go into meltdown mode when there is a change in routine or an expected event does not happen. For instance a boy may be having a great time “rough housing” with his dad but does not want to stop when dad feels it has gone on long enough. This can become ugly and lead to fewer such play situations. Agreeing to use a timer and stop when the timer says to stop rather than dad might help avoid this.

Here are some tips for coping with a meltdown:

1. Don’t Loose Your Cool

Take a few deep breaths. This triggers the relaxation response and will lower your own anxiety/anger level and make it possible for you to think clearly and model appropriate behavior for your child. Remember the preflight instruction, “When the mask comes down, please cover your own nose and mouth first before you assist your child.”

2. Don’t React – Respond

If you and your child have already agreed on how meltdowns will be handled with a behavior plan, make sure the plan is being followed. As an example, you might have agreed on an incentive program where your child can earn rewards for following the behavior plan. Incentives might be earning points every time he/she is able to calm down before having a meltdown. Points earned can be cashed in at the end of the day for a desired activity such as television time or a special treat.

If you do not have a plan in place then you can respond by saying “WE have a problem here. Let’s see how we can solve the problem TOGETHER.” Find out what the child’s concern is. See if there is a way to address it. It is not giving in if you modify a situation in a way that is more accepting to the child while still meeting your needs as well. Good leaders listen to the people they are leading and incorporate the feedback they receive.

3. Don’t Dictate – Discuss

Ask, “What is making you upset?” Listen carefully and respond empathetically such as “I see you (want or don’t want), what’s up?”  Find out what the child is concerned about. For instance if the problem is not wanting to go to bed, you might say, “I understand you do not want to go to bed right now even though 9:00 is your usual bedtime. What is bothering you about this?” Perhaps the child says, “I need to finish my video game so I can get to the next level.” You then can say, “So here is the problem we have. I want you to go to bed because it is your bedtime and you need your sleep to feel good and do well at school and baseball tomorrow and you want to stay up later to finish your game. I am not saying you don’t have to go to be now but do you have any ideas on how we can solve this?”

For discussion let’s say it is only for a few minutes and you decide for tonight to let him finish the game to avoid an hour or more of meltdown versus a few more minutes. You might say, “Ok for tonight you can finish the game. Tomorrow we can talk about this and come up with a solution so that from now on you will be able to finish what you are doing and go to bed on time.”

It is ok for us to listen to our children’s perspective on difficult situations. If this is an isolated incidence then, problem solving could avoid a major meltdown. However, we need to follow up the next day with a detailed discussion on how this can be avoided in the future.

If this is an ongoing problem, then simply stick to the program/plan you have already set in place. If you have been working on anger management techniques such a taking deep breaths, then remind the child to practice it.

4. Don’t Demand – Encourage

If you have a prearranged plan to follow or you have come to an agreement for this crisis situation then you can say, “I know you are upset right now but I also know you can do a good job of calming down now,” or “You know what our agreement is and I bet you will do your part now just like the great job you did yesterday. I love how you are getting better at this each time.”

5. Don’t Give Up – Stay Committed

  • Raising a child with any type of special need, be it developmental, psychological or medical, requires a tremendous amount of patience and strength to endure and continue to handle tough situations when they come up. Make sure you have a good support system. Be sure to have a break from time to time to do something fun and relaxing. Also, try to view the whole situation from the 30,000 foot level to see the progress you have made so far and that meltdowns now and then can just be little bumps in the road to helping your child learn to cope with the day to day events they encounter.
  • If you have truly committed to following a behavioral approach under the guidance of a mental health provider and are not seeing progress, please don’t hesitate to discuss this with your child’s physician. A referral to a psychologist for a comprehensive evaluation may uncover other conditions that may need to be addressed. Sometimes ADHD may be misdiagnosed or a child can have more than one disorder which needs to be addressed.
  • When talking to a professional, you should be able to tell them when and where these episodes happen and what took place just before the meltdown; these are valuable clues that a well trained clinician can use to modify your approach or discover an underlying skill deficit that can be improved or addressed.
  • Sometimes, when behavioral approaches have been in place for some time and have been tweaked all they can, medication may need to be considered. Parents should be cautious about having their child placed on medication prematurely, but when symptoms are severe and interfering with a child’s ability to function in several environments then medication should be considered and can be extremely helpful.

I am stressed from past 2 months I don't know what to do next. I am becoming fat and facing hair fall. Also other health issues from stress.

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
I am stressed from past 2 months I don't know what to do next. I am becoming fat and facing hair fall. Also other hea...
Hello lybrate-user hi. You can just try all these things in your life. Stress is a hidden enemy with a constant capacity to wrack havoc on your body and mind. Its actions are insidious, slow but powerful. The consequences can be debilitating on your physical and mental wellbeing. This is even more relevant today, in our extremely complex civilized society where stress triggers are automated by our rushed living. After more then 10 years battling the consequences of extreme stress and testing numerous techniques I can give you 21 ways to manage stress. Just be disciplined about it and apply them constantly. You will be amazed by the results. 1. Go to sleep early and get up early. This is a powerful routine that will manage your stress hormones and give you a fresh start every day. 2. Start a morning routine. Dedicate just 20 minutes every morning to yourself, to clear your mind and thoughts and prepare for the journey ahead. My routine consists of 10 minutes meditation, a cocktail of green and black tea follow by a green shake, and writing a few thoughts in my journal 3. Improve your diet. This is essential. Eat better, whole foods at regular intervals throughout the day; eat slowly, chew your food and don’t drink your calories. 4. Drink plenty of water every day, throughout the day. You should aim for at least 2 liters. 5. Stay away from coffee and smoking. Those habits will interfere with your adrenaline and cortisol levels, increasing stress and anxiety. 6. Improve your sleep. You want to improve not just your sleep quantity but your sleep quality also. Make sure your bedroom has the right temperature for sleep, the air is clean and that you keep your phone and laptop in another room. 7. Make time to relax throughout the day. Consciously relax every morning through prayer and meditation. Also take a break in the afternoon and find at least half an hour of private time in the evening just to relax. 8. Breathe! Incorrect breathing patterns interfere with your O2-CO2 balance and can trigger stress response, anxiety and panic attacks. Try to breathe through your abdomen, not your chest, and train yourself to slowly breathe in and extend your exhalations. Avoid hyperventilation 9. Reduce your sitting time. If you have a desk job, mindfully remind yourself to stand up and walk for at least five minutes every hour. 10. Go for a walk. Walking for 15 minutes daily, preferably in a park has been shown to reduce stress, improve mood and increase stamina. 11. Try a technology detox every week. Prolonged smartphone using has been linked to increased stress so try to have a technology fast. Pick a day of the week and just don’t use your phone or tablet. The world won’t stop and you will feel better the next day 12. Drink a morning vitamin shake. I use almond milk, yoghurt, green powder, banana, vegan protein, flaxseeds and chia seeds 13. Find a hobby and stick to it. I used art which kept me busy in a meaningful and distressful way 14. Smile more and find reasons to be optimistic. Every day when I write in my journal or my to do list I star by drawing a smiley face. That is how I program my brain for a optimistic view of things 15. Manage rumination and mind chatter. Try to stop inner mind dialogues and meaningless mind chatter 16. Practice mindfulness. I do it when eating, when walking, when breathing 17. Exercise more. Working out has been linked by numerous studies to improved mood, happiness and less stress. Take up an exercise routine, run, join a gym or just walk every day 18. Try an evening ritual. Mine consist of taking a bath while listening to relaxing music. Simple yet effective 19. Read more and watch TV less. This will unwind your racing mind and automatically calm your body 20. Make social life a habit. This will reduce cortisol levels to a healthy dose and improve your mood while spending a quality time with friends 21. Snack on healthy food. No ice cream or cake but instead try a handful of nuts, a yoghurt or an apple Thank You All The Best.
3 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Guidelines For Parent Child Relationships

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
Guidelines For Parent Child Relationships

The “3 Fs” of Effective Parenting

Discipline should be:

  • Firm: Consequences should be clearly stated and then adhered to when the inappropriate behavior occurs.
  • Fair: The punishment should fit the crime. Also in the case of recurring behavior, consequences should be stated in advance so the child knows what to expect. Harsh punishment is not necessary. Using a simple Time Out can be effective when it is used consistently every time the behavior occurs. Also, use of reward for a period of time like part of a day or a whole day when no Time Outs or maybe only one Time Out is received.
  • Friendly: Use a friendly but firm communication style when letting a children know they have behaved inappropriately and let them know they will receive the “agreed upon” consequence. Encourage them to try to remember what they should do instead to avoid future consequences. Work at “catching them being good” and praise them for appropriate behavior.

The Use of Reward In Positive Parenting

When ever possible try to use reward and praise to motivate your child to improve their behavior.

For younger children you can use “grandma’s rule.” Say, “When you have picked up all your clothes, you may go out and play.” Be sure you use “when” rather than “if.”

 

Because of tension of study I got in depression. What can I do for this problem. Please help me.

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
Because of tension of study I got in depression. What can I do for this problem. Please help me.
Hie, If you are having one of that dark days of depression “ its okay “ Its okay to feel that darkness If you're going through some sort of depression, I know it feels bad, bad enough that it might be even so hard for you to get out of your bed but just remember “ depression comes to the people who uses it as fuel “ There are two types of people The one who becomes the victim Second is the one who accepts the fact that • Depression makes him/her stronger •Depression makes him/her wiser •Depression makes him/her grow I know its painful for you because life's freaking painful but suffering is a CHOICE Just remember • you are not built to be average You should study hard! I know, It can be stormy now but it won't rain forever. Someone wise said" everything in the end will eventually be okay and if its not okay then its not the end" AND JUST JUST READ THIS STORY. I had something similar to this when I was a senior in college. I had been so antisocial and fatigued, that I literally lost contact with people even in the next room and all down the hall in my dorm. I, of course, had reached a point where I had to at least pass every class that I was taking. I was in a relationship that I wasn't sure was right for me. And, I simply could not focus, and felt so sad. I happened to be taking a psych class. One day, after class, I followed my psych prof to his office and very nervously told him how I was feeling. His advice, of course, was given to me as a teacher, since we did not have a doctor patient relationship. This is a summary of his suggestions for me. He told me that I should make any decisions that I could, even if in the long run that decision had to be examined again. He felt that the inner debate on making a decision about my relationship was taking too much emotional energy. I was at a point where I just could not get any work done. He asked me what I thought the longest time was that I could study/do my work. I told him maybe 10 or 15 minutes. So he said to begin with 10 minutes. Take a break. Think about what you accomplished. Walk outside for a few minutes. When you go back into the dorm, say hello to anyone you see. Just hello and their name if you know it. If there are any doors wide open on the hall, just lean in a bit and say hello, and name. Then my next session should be 15 minutes. Then the same as above. He suggested that I have some kind of system to get me back on track after the breaks…have a friend check on me every hour or so, use a timer, have my parents call every hour, use an alarm clock…anything that would mark an ending and beginning to work. And then 20 more minutes of work and a break with leaving the dorm, saying hello to people, and thinking about whatever I wanted. He asked what I thought was reasonable break time and I just didn't know. So we talked about the most imposing things I needed to get done, and the amount of time that would take and the due date. So we decided that my breaks should be no more than 15 minutes. If there were things that took a larger block of time, like getting lunch or dinner, then I would extend the break to 30 to 40 minutes and then I returned to the work-break schedule. So after 15 min. Of work, then a break thinking about what I had accomplished, going outside, speaking to people was for the first 5 days, increasing to 20 min. Of work and then 30 minutes the last week. It worked those last few of weeks of school. I felt like a robot and that is exactly what I needed to survive that time period. He met with me again for an hour, after a week and then an hour the next week. Of course, he agreed to help me based on my agreeing to get therapy as soon as I finished up. In summary, I think what he was trying to do was stabilize me and put me into an autonomic program, so I could accomplish something, He also felt that I should at the least make human contact by speaking to people by name. Of course, what happened was people saying hi in return, asking about this or that, and a few people dropping by my room to chat. And, frequently, I found myself stretching out the length of the work time. I had to limit my talks with the person in my relationship, and not be with him for about 3 weeks. It was worth it since I did not want to lose an entire semester of school with only 3 weeks left. I hope this helps. You need to talk this through with your parents so that you can see a therapist as soon as possible. If for some reason you cannot approach your parents with this, either choose a teacher, a minister, other family member, or any adult who can be your advocate with your parents. You school or local community may also be able to provide help or counselling. By gaining some control over your life, it makes you feel more alive and helps you think about solutions. You will be in my thouGHT. THANK yOU All The best.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello sir may pichle 7 salse depression may hoon sir meri skin dark hain isliye mujhe 7 salse sharam ati hai sir please give me answer.

M.Sc - Applied Psychology, MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy, PG diploma in child guidance and family therapy
Psychologist, Delhi
Hello sir may pichle 7 salse depression may hoon sir meri skin dark hain isliye mujhe 7 salse sharam ati hai sir plea...
Hie lybrate-user For depression please consult any counselor and Psychologist for face to face counselling and side by side try all these steps. Depression is a part of every individual. It comes in all sorts, in different forms and in varied levels. It is not easy to say that we already have been so affected with the many things that come our ways. It is in fact easier to hide that we are indeed so sad, so vulnerable and for that, it is best to cover up what we feel inside. What I have here are things to do to overcome any extreme sadness, at least before things get off-hand. To overcome depression, always ask yourself, what really is my problem. I know I have to know what is wrong, I have to know what really is the matter. After that, try to find out, what made it wrong, what gave me this problem, what caused this. Then try to think of the best solution to deal with it. But then there are times when even despite knowing all the answers to these you still cannot find the answers. So I know it is good to always ask help. You can ask help from your family and even your friends can offer you advice too. You can always seek comfort to people who love you. And of course to give you concrete answers so you know how to help yourself, you can always seek professional help. Definitely seek medical help if things really get out of hand. But as of now, if you are sure that your family and friends are enough to keep you running a happy life. Go out and window shop. Go to the gym and work out. Buy yourself an ice cream cone. It is always good to pamper yourself once in a while especially when you need it most. I don't mean that it is alright to eat everything in your refrigerator. What I want to point at is if you feel down, then do something that you really like most. That way, you know that you are indeed doing something good not for anybody else but for yourself. Reading can be of great help, it can even answer your own questions about how to deal with life. It also is the same with chatting and talking to people. When we are depressed, we have tendencies to allow a personal bubble to eat us up. This bubble will limit us, our words, our actions. We shouldn't allow that, otherwise we will feel too defenseless, too helpless to overcome depression. Here are some things to do every day: Exercise - This is the best way to conquer depression. It’s hard to “think your way out of depression.” But if you engage your body, you will feel better. Meditate - There are so many forms of meditation and some of them are really easy. The benefits of meditation are endless too. Here’s an introduction to meditation I wrote. Learn to breathe deeply - Make a routine of breathing deeply into your belly. This relaxes both the body and mind. I do this whenever I start to feel anxious, fearful, depressed or really any negative emotions. Get out in nature - Nature just makes you feel at peace Walk outside Express yourself creatively - Write, draw, paint, dance, sing, design…etc. Whatever medium you prefer. Creative expression helps with moving any stuck or negative energy. Help someone else - Make someone’s day, give someone a compliment…etc. This takes the focus off of yourself. Plus, helping people feels good. Focus on gratitude - FEEL gratitude in your heart for everything in your life. Even if the only thing you can think of is being alive, that’s more than enough to feel gratitude. Thank You All The BEst.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed

Near By Doctors

87%
(58 ratings)

Dr. Pooja Anand Sharma

Ph.D - Psychology, M.Sc. - Counselling and Psychotherapy, M.A - Psychology, Certificate in Psychometric Testing, Basic Course in Integrated Hypnotic Modality for Behavioral Resolution, Certificate in Cognitive Behavioral for Couple, B.Ed- Psychology Hon.
Psychologist
Vishwas Healing Centre- Rohini, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
89%
(485 ratings)

Dr. Vikas Khanna

BDS, Certification in hypnotherapy, Certification in N.L.P, Certification in Gene and behavior, Psychology at Work
Psychologist
Dr Vikas Khanna's Counseling & Hypnotherapy Clinic - Rajouri Garden, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
92%
(47 ratings)

Dr. Rakhi Anand

PhD - Clinical Psychology, Diploma in Clinical and Community Psychology, MA - Clinical Psychology, BA - Psychology
Psychologist
Arora Polyclinic, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
88%
(12 ratings)

Ms. Anu Gehlot

M.Phil - Psychology, Masters In Psychology, BA-Psychology
Psychologist
Monga Medical Centre, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
92%
(10 ratings)

Dr. Deepali Batra

M.Phil - Clinical Psychology, M.A.- Clinical Psychology
Psychologist
PALS For Children & Adults, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
92%
(254 ratings)

Dr. Aradhana Sharma

B.A. Psychology, M.A. Psychology, Ph. D - Psychology
Psychologist
Anubhuti Clinic, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment