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Max SmartSuper Specialty Hospital-Saket, New Delhi

Max SmartSuper Specialty Hospital-Saket

  4.6  (12 ratings)

Cardiologist Clinic

#2, Press Enclave Road, Saket. Landmark: Near Malviya Nagar Metro Station & Hauz Rani Bus Stop, Select City Walk Mall, Delhi New Delhi
1 Doctor · ₹800 · 6 Reviews
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Max SmartSuper Specialty Hospital-Saket   4.6  (12 ratings) Cardiologist Clinic #2, Press Enclave Road, Saket. Landmark: Near Malviya Nagar Metro Station & Hauz Rani Bus Stop, Select City Walk Mall, Delhi New Delhi
1 Doctor · ₹800 · 6 Reviews
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Our mission is to blend state-of-the-art medical technology & research with a dedication to patient welfare & healing to provide you with the best possible health care....more
Our mission is to blend state-of-the-art medical technology & research with a dedication to patient welfare & healing to provide you with the best possible health care.
More about Max SmartSuper Specialty Hospital-Saket
Max SmartSuper Specialty Hospital-Saket is known for housing experienced Cardiologists. Dr. Sanjib Patra, a well-reputed Cardiologist, practices in New Delhi. Visit this medical health centre for Cardiologists recommended by 70 patients.

Timings

MON
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
SAT
02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

Location

#2, Press Enclave Road, Saket. Landmark: Near Malviya Nagar Metro Station & Hauz Rani Bus Stop, Select City Walk Mall, Delhi
Saket New Delhi, Delhi - 110017
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Doctor

Dr. Sanjib Patra

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist
92%  (12 ratings)
21 Years experience
800 at clinic
₹300 online
Available today
02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
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Left Ventricular Assist Device - Understanding Its Usage!

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Left Ventricular Assist Device - Understanding Its Usage!

A left ventricular assist device is an electromechanical device used in cases of advanced heart failure. In later stages of heart failure when the heart is weakened and no longer able to pump the necessary amount of blood, a left ventricular assist device can be surgically implanted to assist the heart’s functions.

A left ventricular assist device is often used as a short term solution and is different from a pacemaker, which is a long term cardiac assist device. The cases in which a left ventricular assist device is often used are:

  • As a temporary solution while a cardiac failure patient is on a transplant list or otherwise waiting for a heart transplant.
  • During recovery from cardiac surgery when the heart is not strong enough to function on its own. The device would soon be removed as the patient recovers.
  • During recovery from heart attacks

Having a left ventricular assist device implanted gives the heart time to rest and recover, leading you to the point where your heart can go back to functioning on its own. However, there are cases where a left ventricular assist device can be implanted as a long term solution. This treatment is called Destination Therapy and requires implanting a left ventricular assist device for several months or several years.

How a Left Ventricular Assist Device works?
A Left Ventricular Assist Device can only be surgically implanted. It has both internal and external components with a pump attached to your heart and a controller on the outside of the body. The pump is attached to the heart with a tube that directs blood into the aorta. The pump and the controller are connected through a cable called the driveline. Since the Left Ventricular Assist Device is powered by electricity or batteries, a power source is also worn outside the body and is attached to the controller, powering both the controller and the pump.

How a Left Ventricular Assist Device can affect your lifestyle?
Many people around the world have Left Ventricular Assist Devices implanted on both a temporary and permanent basis. While a person should be resting while recovering from a heart attack or cardiac surgery, it is possible to go about your normal daily life whilst having a Left Ventricular Assist Device implanted. While certain exercises and stress should be avoided when having a heart condition or when implanted with a Left Ventricular Assist Device, with carrying cases for power sources and controller that can operate from various different power sources, it is easy to live a normal productive life. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

2222 people found this helpful

Too Slow Heart Rate - Know The Reasons Behind It!

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Too Slow Heart Rate - Know The Reasons Behind It!

The heart is a muscular organ and beats at regular intervals. This is known as heart rate, which indicates a person’s overall health. In a normal healthy individual, it ranges from 60 to 100 depending on overall health status. A heart rate outside of these ranges is usually a cause for concern.

Bradycardia is when the heart rate is below 60. While this could be a sign of fitness and health in some, it could also mean an underlying cardiac condition in others. Low heart rate is seen in many athletes, who normally have a heart rate below 60, with no symptoms or problems.

However, in others, slow heart rate can be an indication of an underlying heart problem. The electrical system in the heart could be affected, leading to alteration in blood supply to the heart and other vital organs. This needs further investigation and management to restore normal cardiac function.

Causes: Some of the reasons for reduced heart rate include:

  1. Normal aging process, as with all body functions, aging slows down the heart’s electrical function, leading to reduced heart rate
  2. Heart conditions like coronary artery disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart attack, and infections of the heart muscles (endocarditis or myocarditis)
  3. Pulmonary conditions like sleep apnea
  4. Hormonal conditions like hypothyroidism
  5. Metabolic conditions like increased potassium
  6. Increased iron accumulation in the body
  7. Medications like beta-blockers and digoxin

Symptoms: While bradycardia does not cause symptoms in some, in others, where it has an associated medical condition, the following would be seen too:

  1. Extreme levels of fatigue, with near-fainting episodes
  2. Regular bouts of dizziness
  3. Shortness of breath with even minimal activity
  4. Weakness, tiredness, and low energy levels
  5. Chest pain bouts
  6. Lack of mental energy and confusion
  7. Memory problems

Complications: If left untreated, bradycardia can cause:

  1. Fainting spells, where the patient may just collapse in the midst of an activity
  2. Heart failure, where the heart is not able to pump enough blood
  3. Sudden cardiac death

Risk factors: If you have any or some of the following, do not ignore bradycardia.

  1. Age (more common in older adults)
  2. Hypertension
  3. Diabetes
  4. Smoking
  5. Heavy alcohol abuse
  6. High levels of emotional stress

Treatment: Once diagnosis of bradycardia and underlying disease is confirmed, treatment will be two-pronged.

  1. Correct underlying condition like hypothyroidism, electrolyte imbalance and infections.
  2. Work on managing chronic conditions like coronary disease, diabetes, and obesity.
  3. Prepare the patient to watch for episodes of bradycardia and ways to manage them.

While bradycardia per se is not a concern, other conditions should be managed so the heart keeps working to its optimal level. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

3096 people found this helpful

Heart Problems - How Alcohol Can Worsen It?

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Heart Problems - How Alcohol Can Worsen It?

You must have heard this very often that drinking alcohol can lead to heart problems or even a heart attack, but you might not be sure how this is exactly explained. There is no doubt that consuming anything in excess can lead to serious health issues. Interestingly experts invariably mention that a drink or two every day keeps your heart healthy and can even prevent a stroke from occurring. So how does this gel with the conclusion that alcohol is not good for your heart? 

It starts with pre-existing conditions
Before one even considers this question of excessive alcohol consumption, the more critical issue is there are certain categories of people who should not go anywhere near a bottle of the liquor. These are:

  • Diabetics
  • Those with known conditions of high BP
  • People who have already suffered strokes or have heart-related issues
  • Those having high triglycerides and also
  • Those already consuming certain medications for any condition not related to above
  • You can add pregnant women to this as well as people who are already obese.

In the case of these people, the risk of alcohol consumption is high and as far as possible they should avoid drinking any alcoholic liquor. The difficulty that arises in most cases is people may not be aware that they could be carrying some of these conditions and they would be merrily enjoying their evening drinks or even a weekend binge. These could be quite dangerous for their health. In the last category listed above, alcohol might react adversely with some drugs and if the person is taking the drugs regularly, it puts him/her directly in the line of risk of a heart failure.

The effect of alcohol on your system
The chemistry part of this is explained that alcohol can directly impact the individual’s blood pressure. It tends to increase as the person keeps drinking over and over. Simultaneously there is an increase in certain fats in the bloodstream. Indirectly, this fat could lead to obesity and that could precipitate disorders like diabetes.

Apart from this, there is sufficient evidence to link excessive drinking to life-threatening diseases like cancer, peptic ulcers and serious deficiencies in the liver that can lead to fatality. So from every perspective, consumption of alcohol of any concentration, meaning whether it is beer or wine or the harder forms like whisky and rum, the risk to the heart is real and for those with prior conditions, the damage to the health could only get hastened. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

1998 people found this helpful

Heart Attack - How To Live After It?

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Heart Attack - How To Live After It?

A heart attack makes you rethink and get a double take on life. Once you survive it, you tend to realize how close your brush with death has been and how important your lifestyle choices can be. Most people go on to live a productive life after a heart attack provided they can adhere to making healthy choices. Here's what you can do if you have experienced your first attack and want to change for the better:

  1. Start at the hospital: A person usually stays in the hospital for 3 days after an attack to monitor their condition. This duration increases if you have complications that involve procedures like a bypass surgery. Your first significant change will come in the form of your medication routine. Your existing dosage may be adjusted and you'll possibly be prescribed newer medicines that will treat and control your symptoms. You'll not only need to know the names of all your medicines, but when you have to take them. It's best you know exactly why you are taking each one of them, if there are other more economic alternatives since this may last a lifetime and what side effects they may have.
  2. Maintaining your mental health: Once bitten, twice shy applies for heart attack victims too. Not only do they live in a constant worry about another attack, every small symptom like a harmless muscle pull can trigger the fear factor. You also get into the "heart patient" dependent mode based on how much help you need to recover. Check for support groups and other heart attack survivors in your locality to see how they are coping. Read more about your recovery and try to keep a positive frame of mind.
  3. Go to a cardiac rehab: Many hospitals have a rehabilitation program that you can participate in as an outpatient or you can go to a clinic that specializes in it. Such programs help speed up your recovery. It is run by people who will hand hold you in bringing positive changes in your life to protect and strengthen your heart. You'll learn activities that positively improve heart functions and reduce your chances of developing complications or dying from heart disease. You'll also get benefit from exercises that'll be taught by a certified exercise specialist.
  4. Make a change in your lifestyle: Quit smoking that is an obvious one. You'll now have to lead a more active lifestyle with daily exercise. You'll also need to actively manage your diabetes and obesity. None of these changes can happen in a day. In fact, behavioral scientists suggest that you need to practice a new activity continuously for twenty one days for it to become a habit. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.
1933 people found this helpful

Living With a Heart Patient - 5 Things You Must Know!

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Living With a Heart Patient - 5 Things You Must Know!

The heart is a muscle that pumps blood to the body through a network of arteries and veins controlled by valves. A heart disease could mean a problem in any of these organs, heart per se, the blood vessels, or the valves. Like it or not, heart problem is a chronic condition. It starts without any notice, and for sure, it is not going to go away completely. What can be done, though, is to manage it beautifully and lives and enjoy life so that the heart disease is not stopping you.

When there is a person with the chronic condition, it is not just that person who is affected, but the near and dear ones as well. When heading out for a dinner or when planning a gathering, there would be certain things that need to be accounted for and considered to accommodate the needs of the affected person. These very soon become a way of life and can be done effortlessly.

The following are some things to bear in mind when living with a heart patient.

  1. Diet: Heart patients would have some dietary preferences based on the heart condition per se. This may include a need for more whole grains and vegetables, need for specific types of oils, specific cooking methods, etc. At home, it is essential to ensure these things are always stocked up. When heading out, whether it is to visit someone or out for a meal, take into account whether these would be available. The next best option should be kept in mind so that dietary intake is not affected. Gradually, with time, substitutes can be identified with which they could manage in most places.
  2. Medications: Make sure the medication kit is always readily available. Make sure the person does not miss any medications, whether at home or outside. Ensure the regular medicines are in stock and some common emergency ones are also readily available.
  3. Routine: Whether it is their morning walk or yoga or meditation, it is better to stick to the routine as much as possible. The person also should learn to adapt based on circumstances; however, to the maximum extent possible, these should be continued without major interruption.
  4. Monitoring: Be it blood pressure, sugar levels or weight, these need to be monitored regularly and any deviations should be brought to the notice of the doctor immediately.
  5. Other equipment: Whether it is a walker, inhaler, or a wheelchair, these should be functional and available. The home or the living place should not be cluttered to allow for the easy use of this equipment.

While these may initially require some effort, with time, it would just happen naturally. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a cardiologist.

2259 people found this helpful

All About ECMO - Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
All About ECMO - Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

How many of us had heard about Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) before Tamil Nadu, Chief Minister late J Jayalalithaa was put on it for recovery? Hardly a handful. Patients who are placed on the device have 50-50 chance of survival and while it could not help the late Chief Minister, her condition put a spotlight on ECMO.
 
What is ECMO?
ECMO is a life support device that is put in place when a patient’s heart and lungs stop functioning completely post a cardiac arrest. When the patient does not respond to Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), the patient is put on ECMO.  
 
Function of ECMO 
The core function of the device is to separate carbon dioxide from the blood and add oxygen into it. It takes the load off from heart and lungs, providing critical time to the body organs for its treatment and recovery.
Patients are only put on ECMO, if there is a chance that the condition can be reversed. 
 
How does ECMO work? 
The device drains blood from a vein, which is attached to an oxygenator machine. The machine then removes carbon dioxide from the blood and adds oxygen to it. Depending upon the condition of the patient, the warm blood is either pumped into the body with the help of the machine or is transferred back into the body through an artery. 
 
How long a patient can be on ECMO?

  1. After seven days of being put on ECMO,there are chances of patient getting an infection.
  2. In case the patient contracts an infection, it is recommended to take the patient off ECMO support.
1832 people found this helpful

Congestive Heart Failure - Factors that Make it Fatal

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Congestive Heart Failure - Factors that Make it Fatal

Our survival is solely reliant on the working of the heart. It is this that makes the prospect of a heart failure so fatal and so terrifying. Notwithstanding what the heart evokes, a heart failure is not indicative of a defunct heart; but only a situation when the heart pumps weaker than what is generally deemed as natural. Consequently, the blood flows at a slower rate to the heart and the body that in turn increases pressure in the heart. The oxygen that is produced by the heart in such a scenario is scanty and insufficient for the body.

body responds with its own defense mechanism, as the heart, in an attempt to hold more blood, stretches its chambers. Though this strenuous effort may keep the blood moving, it would gradually and inevitably weary the heart with all the effort. Subsequently, the kidney responds by retaining more salt and fluid in the body. These fluids may accumulate in different parts of the body, mainly in the legs, feet, ankles leading to congestion in the body. This very condition in medical terminology is referred to as congestive heart failure. 

Different causes can contribute to the onset of such a fatal condition. Some of them are

  1. Coronary artery disease: In such a condition, the arteries supply insufficient amount of oxygen and blood to the heart. Subsequently, the heart receives scanty amount of nutrients and oxygen.
  2. Heart attack: The sudden, unanticipated blockage of the coronary artery and the ensuing stoppage of the flow of the blood lead to a heart attack. The heart muscles are damaged in such a case and prevent the proper functioning.
  3. Diseases: Though the term may be generic and over expansive, most of the ailments which people suffer from tend to manifest themselves by posing a potential threat to the functioning of the heart. A high blood pressure, kidney disease, even a thyroid disease can cause congestive heart failure.

Every disorder is preceded by certain symptoms, and congestive heart failure is no different. Some of them are

  1. Fatigue: This is one of the most perceptible symptoms of congestive heart failure. One of the earliest premonitions of an impending heart failure is a nagging sense of weariness and lethargy.
  2. Swelling: As the condition is characterized by accumulation and build-up of fluids in various part of the body, swelling is an inevitable symptom of this condition and a clear indication of the ailment.

If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult the doctor and ask a free question.

1909 people found this helpful

Sudden Cardiac Arrest: What to Do?

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Sudden Cardiac Arrest: What to Do?

Cardiac arrest is reported to be the number one cause of sudden death for people over the age of 40. As it strikes fast and without prior warning, it usually leaves no time for getting help to the patient. Many lives can be saved if the necessary first aid is given immediately by people who know what to do in case of a cardiac arrest.

So first let us know about the signs of a cardiac arrest:

  1. Loss of consciousness: A person may feel dizzy, sweat, faint or collapse suddenly. You can tell if someone has just fainted and not had a cardiac arrest if they are still breathing or have a pulse.
  2. No breathing
  3. No pulse
  4. Muscle twitching.

Now that you have recognized the signs; here is what you can do:

  1. Call the ambulance and try getting an emergency medical professional to attend to the person.
  2. If professional help isn't available, emergency resuscitation measures must begin. An automated external defibrillator (AED) can rapidly determine whether the person has an abnormal heart rhythm that can be treated by an electric shock (called defibrillation). AEDs are available in many public gathering places, such as stadiums and concert halls. An AED is used before calling for help and before attempting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) because an AED is more likely to save lives. If the AED detects ventricular fibrillation, it provides an electrical shock (defibrillation) that can restore normal heart rhythm and start the heart beating again. Emergency medical care should be obtained even if the heart has started beating again. If a person remains in cardiac arrest after an AED is used, CPR should be done.
  3. If a person remains in cardiac arrest after an AED is used, other measures are begun, such as opening the airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
  4. CPR combines artificial respiration (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, or rescue breathing) to supply oxygen to the lungs with chest compressions, which circulate oxygen to the brain and other vital organs by forcing blood out of the heart.

To do CPR (artificial respiration), the rescuer's mouth covers the person's mouth and then rescuer slowly exhales air into the person's lungs (rescue breaths). The person's airway must remain opened during artificial respiration. To prevent air from escaping from the person's nose, the person's nose can be pinched shut as the rescuer exhales into the mouth.

Talk to your doctor to find out if you are at risk of a cardiac arrest.

4197 people found this helpful

If I sleep flatly will get upper abdomen pain and feeling like whole chest tightness. Taken ecg was normal . Please tell.

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
If I sleep flatly will get upper abdomen pain and feeling like whole chest tightness. Taken ecg was normal . Please t...
Looks like you are having reflux. Take medications for gerd and do not immediately lie down after dinner.
1 person found this helpful
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Causes and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease

Fellowship in Electrophysiology, Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Causes and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease

Complications in the heart valve occur when the functioning of the heart valve is impaired. Valves of the heart allow the blood to flow in one direction and prevent the blood from flowing back into the ventricles of the heart.

Heart valve diseases can be classified as follows:

  1. Valvular stenosis: This condition occurs when the valves of the heart does not open completely due to stiffness. As the opening is narrow, the heart has to work hard to pump blood. This condition may lead to heart failure.
  2. Valvular insufficiency: This is a condition where the valve does not close tightly. This causes some of the blood to flow back to the valve. As this condition deteriorates, the heart has to work harder to pump blood. 

Types and Causes of valve diseases:

  1. Acquired valve disease: The structure of the valve changes due to various infections or rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever is caused by bacterial infection that had not been treated. It tends to occur in children and cause inflammation of the valve.
  2. Congenital valve disease: This condition usually affects the pulmonary valve where the size of the valve is abnormal.
  3. Bicuspid aortic valve disease: It is a type of valve disease that impairs the aortic valve. Instead of the regular three cusps, the bicuspid valve only has two. This may cause the valve to be stiff or cause it to leak.
  4. Mitral valve prolapse: This condition causes the valve to flop back when the heart contracts. This condition also causes the leaflets of the valve to turn irregularly and cause it to stretch. This condition causes the valve to leak.

SymptomsThe symptoms of valve diseases are as follows:

  1. Weakness: This condition may cause weakness and cause severe discomfort while performing daily activities.
  2. Palpitations: Symptoms such as irregular heartbeats, skipped beats and rapid heart rhythm occurs in this condition.
  3. Rapid weight gain: This condition can cause you to gain weight very rapidly.
  4. It may cause swelling in your ankles, abdomen and feet.
  5. This condition causes shortness of breath. 
4362 people found this helpful
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