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We are dedicated to providing you with the personalized, quality health care that you deserve....more
We are dedicated to providing you with the personalized, quality health care that you deserve.

Timings

MON-SAT
11:00 AM - 08:00 PM

Location

3/24, Old Rajinder Nagar, Shankar Road, Landmark : Opposite To Post Office
Rajender Nagar Delhi, NCT of Delhi - 110060
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Doctors in Delhi Eye Centre

Dr. Ikeda Lal

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist
88%  (14 ratings)
9 Years experience
800 at clinic
₹300 online
Available today
11:00 AM - 02:00 PM
04:00 PM - 06:00 PM

Dr. Harbansh Lal

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology
Ophthalmologist
38 Years experience
800 at clinic
₹1500 online
Available today
06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
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Specialities

Ophthalmology

Ophthalmology

Concerns itself with the treatment of diseases related to the eye
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Patient Review Highlights

"Caring" 1 review "Very helpful" 3 reviews

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ICL (Implantable Contact Lens)

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist, Delhi
ICL (Implantable Contact Lens)

Icl or implantable contact lens is an excellent option for people with high powers. It is an imported lens which is custom made according to your eye power and size. It is also a reversible procedure.

Who are the ideal candidates for icl?
The age if the patient must be over 18 years. People who have very high powers, usually more than -8.00 or people with thin corneas where lasik is not possible are ideal candidates. 

How long does the procedure take? is it painful?
It is a painless procedure since numbing eye drops are used. There is no injection, suture or pad required and it takes around 15 minutes. The oatiebt can get back to work even the next day after surgery. But we operate one eye at a time and the other eye 2-3 days later. 

How long does this lens last?
This lens lasts forever and doesnt get spoilt. If later on a patient debelops cataract, this lens can be removed and cataract surgery performed without any problem.

1 person found this helpful

ophthalmologist Hi Dr. I want to tell you I have both hypermetropia and myopia and I am unable to focus the notebook sometime it becomes blur and sometime headache feeling vomiting not able to focus as much as when I was 17 Is there. Any way to restore vision and get back to normal please help.

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist, Delhi
Hello, sounds like you have mixed astigmatism where there is a combination of hypermetropia and myopia with cylinder. The glasses power needs to be accurate in your case with good centration which means that the centre of the eyes should match the centre of the glasses. LASIK or laser vision correction can also be an option for you if you don’t like wearing glasses. Hope this helps. Regards, Ikeda.
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I am a consistent patient of a disease called stye and it's so painful. How can I get rid of this disease?

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist, Delhi
I am a consistent patient of a disease called stye and it's so painful. How can I get rid of this disease?
Recurrent stye can be a symptom of diabetes. Please get your blood sugar levels checked. Also get your glasses power checked. For now, use antibiotic drops or ointment as prescribed by your ophthalmologist and do hot fomentation 2 times per day. Regards.
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Cataract - What Factors Can Put You At Risk?

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist, Delhi
Cataract - What Factors Can Put You At Risk?

Cataract usually affects people who are above 40. It is a blurring of the eye’s lens, which lies at the back of pupil and iris. It is the most usual cause behind the loss of vision for people above 40. Research also states that it is a major cause of blindness in the world.

Types of cataracts:

  1. Subcapsular cataract: People who are diabetic and those are taking high steroids are more prone to subcapsular cataract. In this type, the cataract develops at the back of the lens.
  2. Nuclear cataract: A nuclear cataract is related to aging. It usually affects the central portion of the lens of the eye.
  3. Cortical cataract: It is a white opacity, which begins from the periphery of the lens and spreads up to the center of the lens in a spot-like manner. It usually affects the cortex of the lens.

Symptoms:

  1. In the beginning, cataract affects a small portion of your eye and affects your vision.
  2. Your vision gradually gets blurred.
  3. Too much exposure to the light might cause glare.
  4. In nuclear cataract, you may notice a short-lived improvement of your near vision.
  5. In subcapsular cataract, you cannot notice any symptoms in the initial days.

Cause of cataract:
The lens inside our eyes acts like a camera and it is made of protein and water. The protein helps in keeping the lens clear. But with aging, the protein may start to form a lump, which causes cloudiness in the eye area. With time the cataract spreads all over the lens and creates more cloudiness, which ultimately leads to blindness. The factors which usually trigger cataract are

  1. Age
  2. UV rays from sunlight
  3. Obesity
  4. Hypertension
  5. Smoking
  6. Consumption of high dosage steroids medicines
  7. Statin medicines
  8. History of eye inflammation or any eye injury
  9. History of eye surgery
  10. Too much consumption of alcohol
  11. Hormone replacement therapy
  12. Family history of cataract

Prevention of cataract:
It cannot be guaranteed whether cataract can be prevented or not. A study shows that cataract is caused due to the oxidative changes in the lens of the eye. Nutrition studies have shown that consuming vegetables and fruits, which are high in antioxidants, may help in preventing cataract. Dietary intake of vitamin E, carotenoids lutein, and zeaxanthin from supplements and food items can decrease the risk of developing a cataract. Sunflower seeds, spinach and almonds are good sources of vitamin E. Kale, spinach, other leafy green veggies are the good sources of zeaxanthin and lutein. Food items that contain Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin C decrease the chances of cataract.

Last, but not the least, when you step out, always wear a sunglasses, which has the ability to block UV rays.

4594 people found this helpful

I have itching in my eyes and throat pain could you please suggest what should be done.

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist, Delhi
I have itching in my eyes and throat pain could you please suggest what should be done.
You could have viral conjunctivitis if eyes are red and watering and sticky as well. If it doesn’t get better, please consult an ophthalmologist.
1 person found this helpful
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Myopia - Ways It Can Be Treated!

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist, Delhi
Myopia - Ways It Can Be Treated!

What Is Myopia (Nearsightedness)?

Myopia is a common refractive error of the eye that makes it difficult to focus on far away objects. People who are nearsighted will see objects close to them clearly, while those further away appear blurry. Myopia is natural. An overall longer shape of the eye usually causes myopia, so it is a naturally occurring visual problem that cannot be prevented. Nearsightedness tends to run in families, but you don't need to have a myopic parent to develop it. Myopia begins at an early age and worsens in the teenage years, but generally stabilizes in adulthood.

Here are the most common signs and symptoms of myopia:

  1. Objects far away, like a chalkboard or road signs, appear blurry
  2. Persistent need to squint or close eyelids to see clearly
  3. Headaches due to eyestrain
  4. Difficulty seeing while driving a vehicle, especially at night (night myopia)
  5. Need to sit closer to the television, movie screen or the front of the classroom
  6. Holding books very close while reading
  7. Not able to notice distant objects

Causes of Myopia

Nearsightedness happens when your eye is longer than normal, or, less often, when your cornea is too curved. It’s a problem in the focusing mechanism of the eyes. However, the exact cause of myopia is not known. Research about myopia supports two key risk factors:

  1. Family history. If one or both parents are nearsighted, the chance of their children developing it increases.
  2. Working up close. Myopia may be helped along by how a person uses their eyes. Intense detail work, long hours in front of a computer or reading can also increase the chances of developing myopia.

Treatment Options for Myopia (Nearsightedness)

When treating myopia, the goal is to help your eyes focus on far away objects. The most common way to achieve this is through

  1. Corrective glasses
  2. Contact lenses
  3. Refractive eye surgery, such as LASIK, is available for adults and those with moderate to high levels of nearsightedness

Adults who have developed cataracts may also have their myopia corrected with an intraocular lens (IOL) that replaces the human lens during cataract surgery. The most appropriate treatment depends on your eyes and your lifestyle. Nearsightedness can also be corrected as part of the cataract surgery procedure.

  1. Contacts and Glasses: Eyeglasses and contact lenses can correct myopia. However, they cannot stop the eye from growing longer or cure the irregular curve of the cornea that causes your blurry vision.
  2. Surgery: Surgery can decrease or eliminate dependency on eyeglasses and contact lenses. LASIK surgery is the most common type of surgery to correct myopia.
  3. ICL (intraocular collamer lenses) or phakic lensesIn adults with cataracts, is an option for those myopic patients who are not suitable for lasik surgery due to either less corneal thickness or very high myopia.
  4. Orthokeratology: A new type of treatment which offers an alternate solutions to people who are suffering from myopia. This is also known as Ortho-K. As a part of this procedure a person has to wear specialized lens overnight, to correct the vision for the next day. Orthokeratology is a process that uses specially designed GP contact lenses to temporarily reshape the contour of the cornea to reduce myopia (nearsightedness). In addition to the benefit of lens-free daytime vision, orthokeratology is starting to be appreciated for its ability to slow the progression of myopia. A number of published clinical studies have found that orthokeratology lens designs inhibit the growth of the eye's axial length, which determines the degree of myopia.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4590 people found this helpful

I am 24 years old and have job which involves lots of work on computer. I face problem of pain in my eyes and dark circles too. My eyes are already week and use spectacles to have proper vision. I would be glad if you can share your knowledge with me which can help me overcome my problem with my eyes. I also want to get rid of spectacles permanently. Kindly help me achieve this and overcome the problem with my eyes.

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist, Delhi
I am 24 years old and have job which involves lots of work on computer. I face problem of pain in my eyes and dark ci...
Computers and digital screens cause eye strain. You need to make sure that your spectacle power is correct. Also follow the 20-20-20 rule which means that you should take a break for 20 seconds after every 20 minutes and look at an object 20 feet away. Laser eye surgery or LASIK is the first choice for removal of spectacles. Hope this helps. Cornea and refractive surgery specialist.
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Foreign Objects in The Eye - How To Deal With It?

MBBS, MS - Ophthalmology, Fellowship in Cornea and Anterior Segment
Ophthalmologist, Delhi
Foreign Objects in The Eye - How To Deal With It?

Excessive blinking or the urge to rub your eyes is most often caused by foreign objects in your eyes. This foreign object can be anything from your own eye lash to dust or a shard of metal. The area these foreign objects affect is the cornea or the conjunctiva. It can scratch the cornea causing an infection of affecting your vision if not treated in time. A foreign object usually enters your eye as a result of a high impact collision or force like wind etc. Some of the symptoms of having a foreign object in your eye include:

  1. Pressure or discomfort in the eye
  2. Pain in the eye
  3. Excessive tearing and clear or bloody discharge from the eye
  4. Increased sensitivity to light
  5. Redness in the eye

Blinking continuously a few times can dislodge some types of foreign objects. If it affects your vision or causes constant tearing consult a doctor. Do not attempt to rub your eyes in an effort to remove the object. Instead restrict the movement of your eye until a doctor can remove the irritant. To avoid further injury to the eye, bandage the eye with a clean cloth. If the object does not allow you to close your eye, cover it with a paper cup and bandage it. Do not use anything, such as tweezers or cotton directly on the eye.

In some cases, the irritants can be seen with the naked eye. If you think something is stuck in your eye, wash your hands and look at your eye under a bright light. Pulling the lower lid down and flipping the upper eye lid can allow you to see the eye more clearly. To remove a foreign object under the upper eyelid submerge the eye in a flat bowl of water and rapidly open and close it a few times. This can help flush the object out of your eye. Alternatively pour a glass of warm water over your eye while keeping them open. Washing the eye can help get rid of irritants stuck under the lower eyelid.

In more serious cases, anesthetic drops are used to numb the eye. The eye will then be observed under a magnifying glass to see the extent of the injury. Your doctor may use several methods to remove the irritant depending on its size and extent of penetration. You may also be given medication to help deal with the pain caused by the object.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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