SJM Superspeciality Hospital - Noida in Sector-63, Noida - Book Appointment, View Contact Number, Feedbacks, Address | Dr. Pushpa Kaul

SJM Superspeciality Hospital - Noida

Gynaecologist, Obstetrician
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SJM Superspeciality Hospital - Noida is known for housing experienced s. Dr. Pushpa Kaul, a well-reputed Obstetrician, Gynaecologist , practices in noida. Visit this medical health centre for s recommended by 49 patients.

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Clinic Address
Plot No. 2, Chhijarsi, NH 24, Near Hindon Bridge, Opposite Shani Mandir, Sec 63, Noida
noida, Uttar Pradesh - 201307
Details for Dr. Pushpa Kaul
University of Kashmir
University of Kashmir
MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology
  • MBBS, MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology
    Obstetrician, Gynaecologist
    Consultation Charges: Rs 500
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  • MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS
    A gynecologist is a doctor who deals with the health and well-being of the female reproductive system as a whole.

    Here are danger signs you should watch out for that signal an immediate visit to your gynaecologist:

    1. Breast problems - The breast problems which you might face at any point of time in your life may also be connected to having abnormal menstrual conditions. The common abnormalities seen by women in their breasts include breast discomfort during periods, abnormal breast changes, breast discharges, lump formations in breasts, and such others.

    2. Abnormal vaginal odour - Abnormal vaginal odour, just like an itchy vagina, may be a sign of a bacterial infection. Sometimes vaginal odour may even be accompanied with a thick and heavy vaginal discharge. This usually indicates vaginal yeast infection (an infection caused by an increase in the number of yeast cells present in your vagina), and if ignored these infections can recur, making sex and urination very painful activities.

    3. Lower abdominal pain - Lower abdominal pain refers to any sensations of irritation and discomfort in the area above the pelvic region. The most common examples of this type of pain are menstrual cramps in the abdomen, lumps in the abdomen and abdominal pain during sexual intercourse. So if you see visible signs of discomfort and pain, then you should go to a gynecologist at the earliest opportunity.

    4. Pre-pregnancy counseling - A gynecologist is the most appropriate person you need to visit before you plan to have a baby. The doctor mostly recommends a complete health checkup so that you have a smooth pregnancy without any complications.
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  • MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS
    Hypertension or high blood pressure is common in pregnant women, even in those who have no previous history of high blood pressure. This leads to complications in about 6 to 10% of all pregnancies around the world. High blood pressure may develop before or after conception and as such needs special medical attention.

    Hypertension prevents sufficient flow of blood to the placenta and this inhibits the normal growth of the fetus. This could result in low birth weight of the child. However, if diagnosed in time and treated properly, hypertension does not affect the child's health too much. There are various types of hypertension during pregnancies, such as:

    Gestational hypertension: This type of hypertension is developed about 20 weeks after conception. There is no abnormality in urine or any signs of other organ damage (as is common with hypertension during pregnancy) but the condition can worsen and complicate very quickly. Pregnant women below the age of 20 and above the age of 40 are often diagnosed with high levels of blood pressure. Women who have heart or kidney conditions before pregnancy and women carrying more than one child are also likely to develop gestational hypertension.
    Chronic hypertension: Chronic hypertension is high blood pressure which develops around 20 weeks before conception and does not normalize within 12 weeks after childbirth. The patient may also have been suffering from high blood pressure for a long time but the complications appear only during pregnancy because high blood pressure rarely exhibits symptoms without an associated condition.
    Chronic hypertension superimposed with Preeclampsia: Women who have hypertension before pregnancy may develop even higher blood pressure levels during pregnancy. This leads to several health disorders like frequent headaches, fatigue and depression.
    Preeclampsia: Preeclampsia is often a serious complication of gestational pregnancy and affects about 5% to 7% of all pregnancies globally. Gestational pregnancy does not always develop into preeclampsia but it needs to be diagnosed and treated in time to avoid the complication. Women who have conceived for the first time or have a history of hypertension in the family are at a greater risk of preeclampsia. The symptoms of the condition are throbbing headaches, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting, pain in the upper abdominal region and shortness of breath.
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  • MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS
    PCOS Treatment?

    Treatment for PCOS is not curative. Treatment focuses on controlling symptoms and managing the condition to prevent complications. The treatment will vary from woman to woman, depending on specific symptoms.

    A healthy diet and regular exercise are recommended for all women with PCOS, particularly those who are overweight. This can help to regulate your menstrual cycle and lower your blood glucose levels.

    Women who don't want to become pregnant may be prescribed birth control pills. These can help treat acne, regulate the menstrual cycle, and lower levels of male hormones, such as testosterone, in the body. If a woman with PCOS is suffering from infertility, fertility drugs may be administered for helping her to ovulate.

    Anti-androgens are drugs that reduce male hormone levels. These can help stop excess hair growth and reduce acne. Diabetes medications may also be prescribed to lower blood glucose and testosterone levels.

    Surgery may be recommended for some women with PCOS. Ovarian drilling is a procedure in which the doctor punctures patient's ovary with a small needle that carries an electric current, in order to destroy part of the ovary. This is a short-term solution that can promote ovulation and reduce male hormone levels.

    Potential Complications of PCOS?

    Women with PCOS have a higher risk of developing:

    hypertension (high blood pressure)
    high cholesterol
    anxiety and depression
    sleep apnea (when a person stops breathing periodically during sleep)
    endometrial cancer (cancer caused by thickening of the lining of the uterus)
    heart attack
    breast cancer
    If you become pregnant, your doctor may refer you to a doctor who specializes in high-risk pregnancies. Women with PCOS have a higher rate of miscarriage, gestational diabetes, and premature delivery. They may also require extra monitoring during pregnancy.

    The earlier the PCOS is diagnosed and treated, the lower is the risk of developing these complications. Avoidance of tobacco products and participating in regular exercise can also reduce the risk of some of these co-morbidities. The patients must talk to the Gynae about what PCOS means for your overall health and how you can prevent serious complications.
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  • MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS
    To support the healthy growth of their baby, pregnant or breastfeeding women need to consume around 400 additional calories per day in order to meet their own and baby's energy needs.

    During pregnancy or while breastfeeding your baby, it is important to eat a variety of healthy foods. The essential nutrients listed below are needed to help you and your baby's health. They're found in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, beans, dairy products, and lean meats.


    Calcium helps build strong bones and teeth and plays an important role in the healthy functioning of the circulatory, muscular, and nervous systems. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should get 1,000 mg of calcium a day. Healthy sources of calcium include low-fat dairy products, spinach, calcium-fortified orange juice and cereals.


    Eating carbohydrates helps provide energy to support the growth and development of a baby both during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The best sources of carbohydrates are whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, which also are good sources of fiber.


    Fiber is a nutrient that can help patients with constipation commonly associated with pregnancy. Whole grains (like whole-wheat bread, whole-grain cereals, and brown rice) and fruits, vegetables, and legumes (beans, split peas, and lentils) are rich sources of fiber.

    Folic acid

    Folic acid helps the healthy development of a baby's brain and spinal cord. It's also needed to make red blood cells and white blood cells. Women who get 400 micrograms (0.4 milligrams) of folic acid daily prior to conception and during early pregnancy can reduce the risk that their baby will be born with a neural tube defect. Good sources of folic acid include fortified cereals, leafy green vegetables, beans, nuts and citrus fruits,

    Healthy Fats

    Healthy fats (unsaturated fats) are used to fuel a baby's growth and development. They are especially important for the development of the brain and nervous system. Healthy fats are found in olive oil, peanut oil, canola oil, avocados, and salmon. While fat is necessary for any healthy diet, it's important to limit fat intake to 30% or less of your daily calorie intake.


    Iodine helps the body's thyroid gland make hormones that help with growth and brain development. Not getting enough iodine during pregnancy can put a baby at risk for thyroid problems, cognitive delays, and even mental retardation. It is recommended that pregnant or lactating women use iodized salt in their cooking and eat foods high in iodine, like seafood and dairy products.


    Eating a diet rich in iron and taking a daily iron supplement while pregnant or breastfeeding helps prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Women who don't get enough iron may feel exhausted and are highly prone to infections. Good dietary sources of iron include lean meats, fortified cereals, leafy green vegetables and legumes like beans, split peas, and lentils.


    Protein helps build a baby's muscles, bones, and other tissues, especially in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. The recommended protein intake during the second half of pregnancy and while breastfeeding is 71 grams daily. Healthy sources of protein include lean meat, peanut butter, eggs, poultry, fish, beans,and tofu.

    Vitamin A

    Vitamin A helps develop a baby's heart, eyes, and immune system. Prenatal vitamins should not contain more than 1,500 micrograms (5,000 IU) of vitamin A and pregnant women should not take vitamin A supplements. Both too little and too much vitamin A can harm a developing fetus. Good sources of vitamin A include milk, dark leafy greens, orange fruits, and vegetables like carrots and sweet potatoes.

    Vitamin B6

    Vitamin B6 helps form a baby's red blood cells; breaking down protein, fat, and carbohydrates; and is needed for normal brain development and function. Rich sources of vitamin B6 include poultry, fortified cereals, fish, whole grains, and bananas.

    Vitamin B12

    Vitamin B12 plays an important role in the formation of a baby's red blood cells, as well as brain development and function. Vitamin B12 is only found in animal products like meat and eggs, so it's important to speak to the Gynae about taking a B12 supplement during your pregnancy and while breastfeeding as well if you're a vegetarian. Rich sources of vitamin B12 include lean meats, poultry, and fish, and low-fat milk.

    Vitamin C

    Vitamin C plays an important role in tissue growth and repair, and in bone and tooth development. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron. Good sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits, fortified fruit juices, broccoli, and tomatoes.

    Vitamin D

    Vitamin D is helpful in the body's absorption of calcium for building healthy bones and teeth. Good sources of vitamin D include fortified low-fat or fat-free milk, egg yolks, fortified orange juice and salmon.

    To support the healthy growth of their baby, pregnant or breastfeeding women need to consume around 400 additional calories per day in order to meet their own and baby's energy needs.

    During pregnancy or while breastfeeding your baby, it is important to eat a variety of healthy foods. The essential nutrients listed below are needed to help you and your baby's health. They're found in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, beans, dairy products, and lean meats.
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