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Nitins Clinic

Practice Statement
By combining excellent care with a state-of-the-art facility we strive to provide you with quality health care. We thank you for your interest in our services and the trust you have placed in us.

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Nitins Clinic is known for housing experienced s. Dr. Nitin Srivastava, a well-reputed , practices in Noida. Visit this medical health centre for s recommended by 62 patients.

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Clinic Address
sector 56
Noida, Uttar Pradesh - 201301
Details for Dr. Nitin Srivastava
  • MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
    1. Make sure your dog has unlimited access to fresh water all the time.

    2. Make sure your dog has access to shade when outside.

    3. Take walks during the cooler hours of the day. Avoid 5-7pm evening as the steam emitting from the road can kill your pet with heat stroke!

    4. When walking, try to stay off of hot surfaces (like coal tar roads) because it can burn your dog's paws.

    5. If you feel it's hot outside, it's even hotter for your pet - make sure your pet has a means of cooling off.

    6. Keep your dog free of external insects (fleas, ticks) - consult your veterinarian about the best product for your pet.

    7. Consider clipping or shaving dogs with long coats (talk to your veterinarian first to see if it's appropriate for your pet).

    8. If you have a short nose breed like pugs or bulldogs, keep a Turkish towel with you whenever traveling. Whenever you notice he/she is panting heavily, you can soak the towel in water n wrap it around his body to have a local cooling effect.
       3 Thanks
  • M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
    Allow your animal to live in its own habitat. Means at the end of day take your pet to the place where it can run for 5-10 mts (dogs, cats), large animals (cattle, buffalo, etc) to a place where it can rome free for at least 15-20 mts you will find productivity of the animal will increase appreciably
       2 Thanks
  • master of veterinary science
    Dont bath your pet dog very often, once in a week is fine, and always use luke warm water, dry the dog with soft turkish towel and than in sunlight if possible or a hair dryer, if required to bath frequently go for wet tissue wipes.
       1 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Parasites don't want to kill your kitten or puppy; they just want to use them as a dinner plate! Our goal is to prevent that from happening. Intestinal parasites have been around forever and are not going away, but you can control them with the proper deworming schedule. Hookworms and roundworms are by far the most common intestinal worms found in puppies and kittens. Roundworms compete with your pet for food, while hookworms live on blood, causing anemia.

    Rough hair coats, diarrhea, malnutrition progressing to intestinal obstruction, and anemia are common issues with worms. We want to feed our pets - not the parasites. That is why we deworm dogs and cats. Don't wait until you are sure your pet has parasites because they have already caused damage at this point.


    Strategically deworming dogs and cats is a practice recommended by the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Worms in puppies and kittens are common. This growth phase of their life is when they are most susceptible! Knowing when to worm puppies and kittens is important.
    • Deworm puppies and kittens at 2, 4, 6, & 8 weeks of age, then again at 12 & 16 weeks of age.
    • Deworm again at 6 months and 1 year.
    • Then deworm as an adult.


    We are recommending the standard here. If your dog or cat is a big hunter, they will need more frequent deworming - you must assess the risk for your pet.

    • General Dog or Cat Worming: Thrice a year for life.
    o Dogs put everything in their mouth and need deworming twice a year to eliminate the parasites they will pick up. Deworm outside cats thrice a year for the same reason.
    • Cats that are strictly inside animals: Deworm twice a year.
    • Cats that like to hunt: 3 times a year may be necessary.

    No matter what the history or age, assume they have parasites!
    • Deworm immediately and repeat in 2 weeks.
    • Then put on the above adult program.


    DOGS :
    • Roundworms and Hookworms
    • Roundworms, Hookworms, Whipworms & Tapeworms


    • Tapeworm, Roundworm & Hookworms
       1 Thanks
  • BVSC
    First aid kits for pets
    Paracetamol syrup
    Hydrogen peroxide
    Powergyl syrup
    Vomikind syrup
    Zymopet drops
    Cotton bandages
    Ear cleanser
    Ice packs
    Mouth cap/basket muzzle
    Elizabethan collar.
       6 Thanks
  • MBA (Healthcare), MVSc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Its winter time, keep your pets warm and provide sufficient nutrition to avoid hair loss.
       5 Thanks
  • BVSC
    The skin of your dog is entirely different from ours. There is significant ph difference so their skin is more sensitive than ours. Their body secretes some essential oils which gets depleted once you start bathing them daily. It results in drying of skin leading to flakes formation of policy kit is.
    Some tips to remember---
    *bathe your pets once in 10 days.
    *groom your pets daily.
    *do not use dettol/phenolic compounds on their body. It can be allergic.
    *don't allow ticks/fleas/mites to thrive on their body.
    *for hairy breeds, go for a complete hair-cut in summers.
    *for breeds with drooping ears, take special care about ear cleaning.
    *never use human soaps & shampoos like dove/clinic plus on dogs body. It can cause allergic dermatitis.
       2 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs

    Dogs must never be fed with following people-food. It’s only slow poison for your pets.

    1. Onions & Garlic: These are highly flavored foods and can cause toxicosis in dogs.
    2. Chocolate: Ingestion of chocolate by dogs can cause abdominal pain and vomiting to them due to the presence of theobromine and caffeine.
    3. Avocado: Dogs must never be fed with avocado flesh or skin. Not just avocado fruit but even various parts of avocado tree are fatal for dogs.
    4. Raisins & Grapes: Even slight feeding of raisins or grapes can pose problem to dogs. Their ingestion can cause kidney failure to them.
    5. Nuts: Nuts contain phosphorus that can cause bladder stones in dogs. Ingestion of walnuts and macadamia result in vomiting, joint swelling and muscular pain in dogs.
    6. Xylitol: Xylitol is a sweetener that is very harmful for dogs for it can cause them loss of coordination, seizure and even liver failure.

    If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.
       671 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and whip-worms are common among young puppies and kittens. All puppies should be given a dewormer for easily-prevented illness caused by these parasites. Read more about how to prevent parasites in your dog or cat

    Common intestinal parasites in dogs and cats

    You've probably heard the names before

    1. Roundworms, 2. Hookworms, 3. Whip-worms and 4. Tapeworms. These are the intestinal parasites most often seen in pets, and each of them can harm your dog or cat in unique ways.

    Symptoms of intestinal parasites in pets
    While worms are usually found in puppies and kittens, infection can occur in dogs and cats of all ages. Signs of an intestinal parasite infection can include:
    Weight loss
    Swollen stomach
    Death (in severe infestations)

    Note that these signs can also be associated with other diseases so if you observe any of them, you should take your pet in to see your veterinarian for an examination. Diagnosing an intestinal parasite infection is usually done through a laboratory analysis of your pet’s faeces.
    De-worming has become a controversial subject.
    Developing de-worming strategies requires consideration of a several different things, including:
    • What parasites are in the area?
    • Are the risks the same all year round or are they seasonal?
    • What parasites pose a risk to an individual pet or what are the pet’s chances of exposure? (e.g. Does the pet go outside? Is it exposed to many other animals? Are there multiple pets in the household?)
    • Are there any people in the household at particular risk for parasitic infections? (e.g. young children, people with developmental disorders that might be more likely to be exposed to pet faeces?)
    Everyone agrees puppies and kittens need more aggressive de-worming, but there are a few different approaches to managing de-worming in adult animals.
    So as far as myself consider regular de-worming in these schedules:
    Puppy de-worming: (age 40 days – 120 days) preferably suspension
    (I don’t recommend de-worming puppies before 30 days as it may affect their nutritional absorption mechanism and reduce the immunity level, while they are feeding with the dam I think they are well protected. )
    1. Puppy at the age of 40-60 days while doing the primary vaccine
    2. Next second dose at the booster stage around 15 days from the first dose i.e. around 55 days – 75 days.
    3. Third dose is at 90-120 days
    Puppies at 120-180 Days of age: preferably tablet
    De-worming around 180 days is preferable and do consult with your vets for specific drug of choice depending up on breed and their nature of infection they have
    Semi adult dogs 180 – 360 days: preferably tablets
    In this period you can de-worm the puppy either once in 2 months if you have a group or pack of dogs or you can once in three months if you have just one dog with you
    Adult dogs anything above 360 days
    Once in every 3 months i.e.. yearly four times is the recommended Schedule for Asia
    BITCH IN HEAT: special condition
    Should be de-wormed at 4- 5 th day of heat and repeat dosage at 9-10th day second dose and third and final dose is after whelping and after the milking period stops i.e. after whelping 60 days apart best way to maintain the breeding bitch as per standards
    Choosing the right dewormer for your dog
    There are many different types and brands of de-wormers on the MARKET: and determining which dewormer to use, whether to administer it by pill or liquid, and at what dose can depend on a lot of factors.
    Knowing which dewormer to use and at what dose can depend on a variety of things such as the type of intestinal parasite present, and the age, size and current health of your pet. Aside from reading the labels on de-worming products, it’s important to discuss the options and your dog’s unique needs with your veterinarian first.
    Your veterinarian can recommend a product that’s appropriate for your pet after a diagnosis has been made of the type and species of the parasite. In addition, some medications can also be used to help control intestinal parasites. Considering that some parasites can infect people as well as pets, certain de-wormers may be used as a preventive measure to decrease the risk to humans.
       4 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    5 Tips to maintain your Dog’s Dental Health

    It is fairly easy to keep your dog’s teeth and gums healthy provided that you regularly take care of your pet and go for frequent health check-ups. Moreover, conducting regular checks at your home will also go a long way in identifying a problem in its nascent stage.

    Here are five tips to ensure that your dog’s dental health remains perfect.

    1) Prevent tooth decay - If your dog frequently consumes plaque-forming food products, it can lead to subsequent build up on its teeth and ultimately lead to certain problems such as tooth loss, gingivitis and receding gums. Ensure that you clean your dog’s teeth on a daily basis in order to avoid any form of tooth decay.

    2) Check your dog’s breath - Although dog breath is usually not pleasant; if your dog smells unusually foul, you should get a check-up done. Moreover, observe if this foul breath is coupled with other issues such as vomiting, excessive urinating or sudden loss of appetite.

    3) Encourage your dog to play with chew toys - Chew toys assist in providing stronger teeth to your pet, while giving a perfect massage for its gums. In addition, continuous chomping helps remove soft tartar and thus keeps teeth clean. Nylon, rubber and rawhide chew toys are the safest for your dog.

    4) Identify signs of oral disease - A number of oral diseases can be prevented or controlled if they are diagnosed at an early stage. Major symptoms of almost all oral diseases are loose teeth, swollen gums, foul breath, excessive drooling, tumours in the gums and cysts under the tongue.

    5) Carefully examine your dog’s teeth and gums - Healthy gums of a dog are indicated by the fact that they are pink in colour and have no signs of swelling. As for the teeth, they should not have any traces of tartar. Carry out this teeth and gum examination each week by lifting your dog’s lips and observing carefully.

    If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.

    From Lybrate: If you found this tip useful, please thank the doctor by clicking on the heart icon below. Also, spread good health by sharing this tip with your loved ones over WhatsApp, Facebook and other media.
       2143 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

    1. The Breath Test

    Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

    2. Lip Service

    Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

    3. Signs of Oral Disease

    The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

    Bad breath
    Excessive drooling
    Inflamed gums
    Tumors in the gums
    Cysts under the tongue
    Loose teeth
    4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

    Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

    5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

    Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

    6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

    Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

    First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
    When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
    Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
    Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
    A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
    7. Brushing Technique

    Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

    8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

    Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

    Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
    Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
    Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
    Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
    Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
    Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
    Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
    Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
    9. Chew on This

    chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

    P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

    10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

    Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
       13 Thanks
  • MVSc, BVSc
    Monsoon may be a great time to go outdoors with your pets and enjoy the rains. But be aware of the hidden dangers.

    - leptospirosis is around and can cause lethal liver and kidney disease in dogs.
    - water logging in metro cities can be a source of such fatal infections. Transmitted via urine of rats/dead rats --> Dogs can readily become infected despite vaccinations.
    - common in farms too, wherever there is rat population.
    - leptospirosis is a contagious to humans as well, and infected dogs, their urine becomes an important carrier for humans.
    - initial signs include vomiting, jaundice, reduced urination, kidney failure.
    - if not identified and treated early, it can become fatal.
    - early diagnosis and specific treatment can save your pet.
    - proper precautions and hygiene can save your family from exposure.
    - do not let your pets walk through, or drink from water puddles.

    Please speak to us for more information on this.
    Have a safe monsoon!
       11 Thanks
  • BVSc
    Five Common Summer Hazards for Dogs

    1. Dehydration
    One of the best ways to keep your dog safe in the summer time is by providing lots of cool, clean, fresh water. Consider preparing low sodium chicken broth or yogurt ice cubes, and introducing canned dog foods (best when frozen in a Kong!) to increase the moisture content in your dog’s diet.

    2. Burned Pads
    Under the summer sun, asphalt on sidewalks and streets can heat to a temperature that can burn a dog’s paws. To avoid scorched paws, walk your dog very early in the morning or in the late evening when the streets have cooled off. If you must walk your dog during the day, dog booties can protect his feet. Always put your hand down on the asphalt for about thirty seconds – if you must pull your hand away because the street is too hot, it is too hot for your dog to walk on without hurting his paws. If you don’t want your hand on the street for thirty seconds, your dog probably does not want his paws on it for thirty or more minutes of walking.

    3. Parasites
    Summer is the season for fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes; pests which can present a minor discomfort to your dog at best and at worst may be life threatening or cause self-mutilating behaviors. Feeding your dog a high quality diet, without preservatives or chemicals will build his immune system, making him generally more resistant to parasite infestation. There are a wide variety of preventatives on the market, including chemical spot-on treatments, repellent shampoos, essential oils, and flea/tick collars; talk to your vet to see what she recommends for your dog. Cleaning your house frequently and keeping your dog well groomed will also reduce the risk of parasite infestation.

    4. Heat Stroke
    Heat stroke is a serious risk to dog’s health – in worst case scenarios, it can be fatal. You can prevent heat stroke by restricting your pet’s exercise during the hottest hours of the day (early morning or late evening are the best times for exercise during the summer), by making sure he is well hydrated, providing cool places for him to relax, providing opportunities to swim, cooling mats, and by never leaving your dog unattended in the car during summer heat.

    Many dogs die annually in hot cars. Even if your windows are cracked or you park in the shade, heat can build quickly in a car in the summer, turning it into an oven. If it’s 95 degrees at noon and you leave your windows cracked, the temperature in your car may still rise as high as 113 degrees. This is a recipe for disaster for your dog. If you must leave your dog in the car for any period of time, the air conditioning should stay on. Leaving a dog to die in a hot car is not just a health risk for your dog, but may be cause for animal cruelty charges in some area. The solution? Don’t leave your dog in a hot car.

    5. Leptospirosis
    Leptospirosis is contracted through bodily fluids or tissue and can be transmitted through direct (as in the case of a bite or ingestion of flesh) or indirect contact (through water sources, food, etc.) with an infected animal. Stagnant waters are a common source of leptospirosis bacteria. Lepto can cause permanent health problems or death if not treated quickly. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, trembling/shaking, lethargy, anorexia, tenderness of joints and muscles, and increased water intake. If you suspect your dog has lepto, get him to a vet right away, an emergency vet if need be.

    There are vaccines for lepto but they do not prevent all strains and can cause significant adverse reactions. Talk to your vet about weighing the risk of infection with the risks associated with the lepto vaccine.
       3 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.

    House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

    How Long It Will Take

    Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

    How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

    All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

    House Training Steps

    1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

    2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

    3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

    4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

    5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

    6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

    Additional House Training Tips

    Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
    Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
    Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
    House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

    What NOT to Do

    Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
    Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
    Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
    Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
    Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
    If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
    Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
       19 Thanks
  • C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
    General Physician
    What are the rules every dog owner should follow?

    The number one way to communicate to a dog that you are his pack leader is to take him/her for a Pack walk daily, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the human who is holding the lead. This is most important for all dogs, as in a dog?s mind, the leader always leads the way.
    A dog must not be allowed to sniff or eliminate anywhere he wishes, but only where you allow him.
    The dog should be concentrating on following the human.
    All humans must eat before the dogs.
    No table scraps should be fed to the dog during a meal.
    Feedings must be at a scheduled time.
    Humans must not let the dog go through any doorway first.
    When you have left the house or the room, even for a minute and come back, ignore the dog for a few minutes.
    A simple obedience command should be given before any pleasurable interaction with the dog. A child in the house should give the commands at least once a day and reward the dog with a treat when the command is followed.
    You should not lie on the floor to watch TV when the dog is around, as a human should never put himself in an equal or lesser height position than the dog.
    You are the first one who greets newcomers; the dog is the last that gets attention.
    If a dog is lying in your path, do not walk around the dog, either make the dog move or step over the dog.
    If you establish eye contact with the dog, the dog must avert his gaze first. Tell the children not to have staring contest with the dog.
    Dogs must not sleep in your bed.
    Games of fetch or play with toys must be started and ended by the human.
    Dog should not be allowed to lie on your furniture.
    No tug?of?war, as this is a game of power and you may lose the game giving the dog reinforcement (in the dog?s mind) of top dog.
    Dogs need to be taught ?drop it? or ?release? command.
    Dogs should not be allowed to pull on the leash.
    When you put the food dish down, the dog must wait until you give the "OK" to eat it.
    Small dogs or puppies who demand to be picked up or put down should not get what they want until they sit or do another acceptable quiet behavior.
    Dogs should never be left unsupervised with children or anyone who cannot maintain leadership over the dog.
    Last but certainly not least... avoid emotions, when you are around your dog. Your dog can sense these emotions and will see you as weak.
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  • BVSc
    Foods which are poisonous to dogs.

    Most dogs love food, and they?re especially attracted to what they see us eating. While sharing the occasional tidbit with your dog is fine, it?s important to be aware that some foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Take caution to make sure your dog never gets access to the foods below. Even if you don?t give him table scraps, your dog might eat something that?s hazardous to his health if he raids kitchen counters, cupboards and trash cans. For advice on teaching your dog not to steal food, please see our article, Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding.

    Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark may contain a toxic principle known as persin. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other varieties of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential.
    Birds, rabbits, and some large animals, including horses, are especially sensitive to avocados, as they can have respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart, and even death from consuming avocado. While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care.
    Avocado is sometimes included in pet foods for nutritional benefit. We would generally not expect avocado meal or oil present in commercial pet foods to pose a hazard to dogs and cats.
    Bread Dough

    Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous if ingested by dogs. When raw dough is swallowed, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach may be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall, resulting in the death of tissue. Additionally, the expanding stomach may press on the diaphragm, resulting in breathing difficulty. Perhaps more importantly, as the yeast multiplies, it produces alcohols that can be absorbed, resulting in alcohol intoxication. Affected dogs may have distended abdomens and show signs such as a lack of coordination, disorientation, stupor and vomiting (or attempts to vomit). In extreme cases, coma or seizures may occur and could lead to death from alcohol intoxication. Dogs showing mild signs should be closely monitored, and dogs with severe abdominal distention or dogs who are so inebriated that they can?t stand up should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover.

    Chocolate intoxication is most commonly seen around certain holidays?like Easter, Christmas, Halloween and Valentine?s Day?but it can happen any time dogs have access to products that contain chocolate, such as chocolate candy, cookies, brownies, chocolate baking goods, cocoa powder and cocoa shell-based mulches. The compounds in chocolate that cause toxicosis are caffeine and theobromine, which belong to a group of chemicals called methylxanthines. The rule of thumb with chocolate is ?the darker it is, the more dangerous it is.? White chocolate has very few methylxanthines and is of low toxicity. Dark baker?s chocolate has very high levels of methylxanthines, and plain, dry unsweetened cocoa powder contains the most concentrated levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, the signs seen can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and death. Dogs showing more than mild restlessness should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
    Ethanol (Also Known as Ethyl Alcohol, Grain Alcohol or Drinking Alcohol)

    Dogs are far more sensitive to ethanol than humans are. Even ingesting a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant
       12 Thanks
  • VM
    deploma Veterinary
    In summer maintain your pet tem. And give them lots of water and give bath 2 time with look warm water not to hot and use anti fungal soap for bath.
       10 Thanks
  • C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
    General Physician
    What does humanizing your dog mean?

    Talking to your dog like he/she is a person.
    Treating your dog like he/she is a person.
    Allowing dogs to do what they want because it will hurt their "feelings"
    Dressing them up in little doggie clothes.
    Remember, humanizing your dog is fulfilling your own human needs, not your dogs. Humanizing dogs does more harm than good.
       8 Thanks
  • MVSc, BVSc
    Your dog?s health is a key to a long and happy companionship. To keep it healthy in long run, it is important to know how your pet?s body work ? in health and disease! Being aware of certain basics helps you to prevent many problems, and pick up the major problems early in its course. In order to react quickly and help your pet?s ailments in timely manner you must be able to spot signs and relate them to specific systems, so as to understand gravity of it and seek Veterinarian?s advice sooner.
       16 Thanks
  • C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
    General Physician
    If an unvaccinated or partially vaccinated pet dog or cat is bitten by a stray dog, wounds should be thoroughly washed with water and an antiseptic such as povidone iodine should be applied.

    If the stray dog is suspected to be rabid, then the pet dog should be put to sleep (Euthanasia). But if the owner is not ready or the rabid status of the stray dog is not known, post?exposure vaccination of the pet with cell culture vaccine and simultaneous careful observation of the pet are recommended for up to 2 months (up to six months is desirable) for possible signs of rabies in the pet. During this period, if the dog becomes sick, the owner should take the dog to the veterinarian to get rabies ruled out at the first instance. It should be noted that post?exposure vaccination is not very successful in dogs. Simultaneously, pre?exposure vaccination of all household members is necessary.
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