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physio care

Clinical Physiotherapist, Homecare Physiotherapist, Neuro Physiotherapist, Orthopedic Physiotherapist, Pediatric Physiotherapist, Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist, Women Health Physiotherapist
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physio care is known for housing experienced s. Mr. Wajid Mohammed, a well-reputed Neuro Physiotherapist, Homecare Physiotherapist, Clinical Physiotherapist, Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist, Women Health Physiotherapist , Pediatric Physiotherapist, Orthopedic Physiotherapist , practices in hyderabad. Visit this medical health centre for s recommended by 84 patients.

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Clinic Address
1-8-523, 2nd floor, Patigadda colony, begumpet.
hyderabad, Telangana - 500016
Details for Mr. Wajid Mohammed
Mother Teresa Para Medical college
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    Neuro Physiotherapist, Homecare Physiotherapist, Clinical Physiotherapist, Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist, Women Health Physiotherapist , Pediatric Physiotherapist, Orthopedic Physiotherapist
    Consultation Charges: Rs 200
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    What Is Sciatic Pain and How to Get Rid of it

    What is sciatica?

    Sciatica is leg pain caused by a pinched nerve in the lower back. Although the pangs begin in nerve roots located on either side of the lower spine, they then course through the sciatic nerve, which runs the length of each leg from the buttock down to the foot. The leg agony, called radiculopathy, "is often worse than the back pain," says William A. Abdu, MD, medical director of the Spine Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Usually felt in one leg, the sensation "can be intolerable," says Birgit Ruppert, a physical therapist at the Spine Center. "Some people liken it to the nerve pain you experience

    Why it happens?
    The most common cause is a herniated disk: When a disk develops a tear or crack and bulges into the spinal canal, it can pinch the sciatic nerve. Usually symptoms clear up within about 6 weeks, but for some people, the pain can last.

    Ice or Heat
    Because the sciatic nerve is buried deep within the buttock and leg, ice or heat on the surface of the body won't ease that inner inflammation. But the time honored treatments can act as counterirritants that is, "they give your body other input in the painful area, and that brings the pain down a notch," says Ruppert. Apply an ice pack or a heating pad as needed for 15 minutes.

    Exercise and Physical Therapy

    Moving is usually the last thing people dogged by sciatica want to do, but it's important to be physically active. "Lying in bed makes it more likely that the pain will last longer," says Ruppert. "Exercise increases blood flow to the disk and the nerve, helping to get rid of the chemicals causing the inflammation." Take 15- to 20-minute walks. If that hurts too much, give swimming or water aerobics a try; there's not as much pressure on the back when you're in the water, says Ruppert. It may also be worth seeing a physical therapist, who can prescribe stretching exercises to restore flexibility to the back or moves that strengthen core muscles, helping to stabilize the spine and reduce the likelihood of a similar injury.
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    Treating leg pain at home

    You can usually treat leg pain at home if it's due to cramps or a minor injury. Try the following home treatments when your leg pain is from muscle cramps, fatigue, or overuse:

    Rest your leg as much as possible, and elevate your leg with pillows.
    Take an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, to help ease discomfort as your leg heals.
    Wear compression socks or stockings with support.
    Apply ice

    Apply ice to the affected area of your leg at least four times per day. You can do this even more frequently in the first few days after the pain appears. You can leave the ice on for as long as 15 minutes at a time.

    Take a warm bath and stretch

    Take a warm bath, and then gently stretch your muscles. If you have pain in the lower part of your leg, try pointing and straightening your toes when sitting or standing. If you have pain in the upper part of your leg, try to bend over and touch your toes. You can do this while sitting on the ground or standing up. Ease into each stretch, holding each position for five to 10 seconds. Stop stretching if your pain gets worse.

    Preventing leg pain

    You should always take time to stretch your muscles before and after exercising to prevent leg pain due to physical activity. It's also helpful to eat foods that are high in potassium, such as bananas and chicken, to help prevent injuries of the leg muscles and tendons.

    You can help prevent medical conditions that may cause nerve damage in the legs by doing the following:

    Exercise for 30 minutes per day, five days per week.
    Maintain a healthy weight.
    Avoid smoking.
    Monitor your cholesterol and blood pressure, and take steps to keep them under control.
    Limit your alcohol consumption to one drink per day if you're a woman or two drinks per day if you're a man.
    Talk to your doctor about other ways to prevent the specific cause of your leg pain.

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    What Is Spondylolisthesis?

    Spondylolisthesis is a spinal condition that affects the lower vertebrae (spinal bones). This disease causes one of the lower vertebras to slip forward onto the bone directly beneath it. This is a painful condition, but it is treatable in most cases. Both therapeutic and surgical methods may be used. Proper exercise techniques can help you avoid this condition.

    Symptoms of Spondylolisthesis

    The symptoms of spondylolisthesis vary. People with mild cases may not have any symptoms. However, people with severe cases may be unable to perform daily activities. Some of the most common symptoms are:

    persistent lower back pain
    stiffness in your back and legs
    lower back tenderness
    thigh pain
    tight hamstring and buttock muscles
    Treating Spondylolisthesis

    The treatment for spondylolisthesis depends on your severity of pain and vertebra slippage. Nonsurgical treatments can help ease pain and encourage the bone to go back into place. It's important to avoid contact sports during the healing process.

    Common nonsurgical treatment methods include:

    wearing a back brace
    doing physical therapy exercises
    taking over-the-counter or prescription anti-inflammatory drugs (such as ibuprofen) to reduce pain
    using epidural steroid injections
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    Back pain is commonly caused by postural stress, muscle strains, disc injuries and arthritis.
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    What is rheumatoid arthritis?

    RA is the most common form of autoimmune arthritis, affecting more than 1.3 million Americans. Of these, about 75 percent are women. In fact, 1–3 percent of women may get rheumatoid arthritis in their lifetime. The disease most often begins between the fourth and sixth decades of life. However, RA can start at any age.

    RA is a chronic (long-term) disease that causes pain, stiffness, swelling and limited motion and function of many joints. While RA can affect any joint, the small joints in the hands and feet tend to be involved most often. Inflammation sometimes can affect organs as well, for instance, the eyes or lungs.

    The stiffness seen in active RA is most often worst in the morning. It may last one to two hours (or even the whole day). Stiffness for a long time in the morning is a clue that you may have RA, since few other arthritic diseases behave this way.

    For instance, osteoarthritis most often does not cause prolonged morning stiffness. Other signs and symptoms that can occur in RA include:

    Loss of energy
    Low fevers
    Loss of appetite
    Dry eyes and mouth from a related health problem, Sjogren's syndrome
    Firm lumps, called rheumatoid nodules, which grow beneath the skin in places such as the elbow and hands.

    What causes rheumatoid arthritis?

    RA is an autoimmune disease. This means that certain cells of the immune system do not work properly and start attacking healthy tissues — the joints in RA. The cause of RA is not known. Yet, new research is giving us a better idea of what makes the immune system attack the body and create inflammation. In RA, the focus of the inflammation is in the synovium, the tissue that lines the joint. Immune cells release inflammation-causing chemicals. These chemicals can damage cartilage (the tissue that cushions between joints) and bone. Other things likely play a role in RA as well. For instance, genes that affect the immune system may make some people more prone to getting RA.

    How is rheumatoid arthritis treated?

    Therapy for RA has improved greatly in the past 30 years. Current treatments give most patients good or excellent relief of symptoms and let them keep functioning at, or near, normal levels. With the right medications, many patients can achieve “remission” — that is, have no signs of active disease.

    There is no cure for RA. The goal of treatment is to lessen your symptoms and poor function. Doctors do this by starting proper medical therapy as soon as possible, before your joints have lasting damage. No single treatment works for all patients. Many people with RA must change their treatment at least once during their lifetime.

    Good control of RA requires early diagnosis and, at times, aggressive treatment. Thus, patients with a diagnosis of RA should begin their treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs — referred to as DMARDs. These drugs not only relieve symptoms but also slow progression of the disease. Often, doctors prescribe DMARDs along with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs and/or low-dose corticosteroids, to lower swelling, pain and fever. DMARDs have greatly improved the symptoms, function and quality of life for nearly all patients with RA. Ask your rheumatologist about the need for DMARD therapy and the risks and benefits of these drugs.

    Common DMARDs include methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall, Otrexup, Rasuvo), leflunomide (Arava), hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) and sulfasalazine (Azulfidine).

    Gold is an older DMARD that is often given as an injection into a muscle (such as Myochrysine), but can also be given as a pill — auranofin (Ridaura). The antibiotic minocycline (Minocin) also is a DMARD, as well as the immune suppressants azathioprine (Imuran) and cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune, Gengraf). These three drugs and gold are rarely prescribed for RA these days, because other drugs work better or have fewer side effects.

    Patients with more serious disease may need medications called biologic response modifiers or “biologic agents.” They can target the parts of the immune system and the signals that lead to inflammation and joint and tissue damage. FDA-approved drugs of this type include abatacept (Orencia), adalimumab (Humira), anakinra (Kineret), certolizumab (Cimzia), etanercept (Enbrel), golimumab (Simponi) infliximab (Remicade), rituximax (Rituxan, MabThera) and tocilizumab(Actemra). Most often, patients take these drugs with methotrexate, as the mix of medicines is more helpful.

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors are another type of DMARD. People who cannot be treated with methotrexate alone may be prescribed a JAK inhibitor such as tofacitinib (Xeljanz).

    The best treatment of RA needs more than medicines alone. Patient education, such as how to cope with RA, also is important. Proper care requires the expertise of a team of providers, including rheumatologists, primary care physicians, and physical and occupational therapists. You will need frequent visits through the year with your rheumatologist. These checkups let your doctor track the course of your disease and check for any side effects of your medications. You likely also will need to repeat blood tests and X-rays or ultrasounds from time to time.

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    Hot packs are very effective as they dilate blood vessels and increase blood flow, delivering needed nutrients and oxygen to cells in the area being heated, aiding the removal of cell waste and promoting healing.
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    Always wear a pair of comfortable lace-up shoes which support your feet, rather than high heels and slippers to prevent yourself from falling.
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    Hot and cold therapy has a tendency to reduce pain, assist with tissue healing, control swelling, and increase flexibility if used appropriately after an injury.
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    Become physically active every day which will improve your posture, muscle strength, and balance and will prevent you from falling.
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    Decline in muscle strength and flexibility, slower balance reflexes and some vision problems are some of the prevalent causes of falling down amongst elders.
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    An overloaded backpack or wearing one improperly can lead to a poor posture, stress on the soft tissue in the neck and the back, and unnecessary strain on muscles and joints.
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    A sudden-onset (acute) bout of neck pain is common. Two out of three of us will have neck pain at some time in our lives. In most cases it is not due to a serious disease or neck problem and often the exact cause for the pain is not clear. This is called 'nonspecific neck pain'. Most are probably due to minor sprains or bad posture. Full recovery occurs in most cases. The usual advice is to keep the neck active. Painkillers are helpful until the pain eases. Persistent (chronic) pain develops in some cases, and further treatment may then be needed.

    Understanding the neck

    The back of the neck includes the cervical spine and the muscles and ligaments that surround and support it. The cervical spine is made up of seven bones called vertebrae.

    The first two are slightly different to the rest, as they attach the spine to the skull and allow the head to turn from side to side.
    The lower five cervical vertebrae are roughly cylindrical in shape - a bit like small tin cans - with bony projections.
    The sides of the vertebrae are linked by small facet joints.

    Between each of the vertebrae is a 'disc'. The discs are made of a tough fibrous outer layer and a softer gel-like inner part. The discs act as 'shock absorbers' and allow the spine to be flexible.

    Strong ligaments attach to adjacent vertebrae to give extra support and strength. Various muscles attached to the spine enable the spine to bend and move in various ways. (The muscles and most ligaments are not shown in the diagram, for clarity.)

    The spinal cord, which contains nervous tissue carrying messages to and from the brain, is protected by the spine. Nerves from the spinal cord come out from between the vertebrae in the neck to take and receive messages to the neck and arms. A major blood vessel called the vertebral artery also runs alongside the vertebrae to carry blood to the rear (posterior) part of the brain.

    What are the types and causes of neck pain?

    Neck pain is common. About 2 in 3 people develop a bout of neck pain at some time in their lives. One survey done in the UK found that, of adults aged 45-75 years, about 1 in 4 women and about 1 in 5 men had current neck pain. Types and causes of neck pain include:

    Nonspecific neck pain

    This is the most common type. This is sometimes called 'simple' or 'mechanical' neck pain. Often the exact cause or origin of the pain is not known. It may include minor strains and sprains to muscles or ligaments in the neck. Bad posture may also be a contributing factor in some cases. For example, neck pain is more common in people who spend much of their working day at a desk, with a 'bent-forward' posture.

    A 'whiplash' jolt to the neck

    This is most commonly due to an accident involving a vehicle, such as a car crash. It can cause neck pain. See separate leaflet called Whiplash Neck Sprain for details.

    Sudden-onset (acute) torticollis

    This is sometimes called 'wry neck'. A torticollis is when the head becomes twisted to one side and it is very painful to move the head back straight. The cause of acute primary torticollis is often not known.

    However, it may be due to a minor strain or sprain to a muscle or ligament in the neck. Some cases may be due to certain muscles of the neck being exposed to cold ('sleeping in a draught'). It is common for people to go to bed feeling fine and to wake up the next morning with an acute torticollis. The pain usually eases and clears away over a few days without any treatment.

    How can I tell if the pain is due to a more serious cause?

    A doctor's assessment and examination can usually determine that a bout of neck pain is nonspecific and not due to a more serious cause. The following are the sort of symptoms that may indicate a more serious problem:

    If neck pain develops when you are ill with other problems such as rheumatoid arthritis, AIDS, or cancer.
    If the pain becomes progressively worse.
    If some function of an arm is affected. For example, weakness or clumsiness of a hand or arm, or persistent loss of feeling (numbness). (As mentioned, some pins and needles may occur with nonspecific neck pain. However, this is mild and usually goes within four weeks.)
    If you feel generally unwell and have 'general' symptoms such as weight loss or a high temperature (fever).
    If the neck bones (vertebrae) are very tender (which may indicate a bone problem).
    If you develop any problems with walking or with passing urine.This may indicate problems with pressure on the spinal cord
    Some other treatments which may be advised include:

    A good posture may help. Check that your sitting position at work or at the computer is not poor. (That is, not with your head flexed forward with a stooped back.) Sit upright. Yoga, pilates, and the Alexander Technique all improve neck posture, but their value in treating neck pain is uncertain.
    A firm supporting pillow seems to help some people when sleeping. Try not to use more than one pillow.
    Various treatments may be advised by a physiotherapist. These include traction, heat, cold, manipulation, etc. The value of each of these treatments is uncertain, as the results of research studies looking at which treatments work best can be conflicting.
    However, what is often most helpful is the advice a physiotherapist can give on neck exercises to do at home.
    A common situation is for a doctor to advise on painkillers and gentle neck exercises. If symptoms do not improve over a week or so, you may then be referred to a physiotherapist to help with pain relief and for advice on specific neck exercises.
    Treatment may vary and you should go back to see a doctor:

    If the pain becomes worse.
    If the pain persists beyond 4-6 weeks.
    If other symptoms develop such as loss of feeling (numbness), weakness, or persistent pins and needles in part of an arm or hand, as described previously.
    Other pain-relieving techniques may be tried if the pain becomes persistent (chronic). A pain management programme may be offered to help you control and live with your pain. Chronic neck pain is also sometimes associated with anxiety and depression which may also need to be treated.
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    Arthritis, stroke or inner ear problems which cause dizziness can cause elders to fall.
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    A poor posture like sitting or driving in a hunched position for too long can strain the neck muscles.
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    Sleeping on your side

    By making simple changes in your sleeping position, you can take strain off your back. If you sleep on your side, draw your legs up slightly toward your chest and put a pillow between your legs. Use a full-length body pillow if you prefer.

    Sleeping on your back

    If you sleep on your back, place a pillow under your knees to help maintain the normal curve of your lower back. You might try a small, rolled towel under the small of your back for additional support. Support your neck with a pillow.

    Sleeping on your stomach

    Sleeping on your stomach can be hard on your back. If you can't sleep any other way, reduce the strain on your back by placing a pillow under your pelvis and lower abdomen. Use a pillow under your head if it doesn't place too much strain on your back. If it does cause strain, try sleeping without a pillow under your head.
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    Back pain often strikes when something's amiss with the delicate column of bones, muscles, ligaments and joints that holds you up. But many other conditions, like strains, arthritis, hairline spine fractures and even kidney infections, can cause your back to throb.

    What you can do

    Ice first, heat later. As a pain reliever, ice works great. It temporarily blocks pain signals and helps reduce swelling. Several times a day, lay an ice pack wrapped in a towel on the painful area for up to 20 minutes. Alternatively, you can use a bag of frozen peas or corn. During the first few days of home treatment, apply the ice pack as frequently as necessary. Later you may still want to use ice after exercise or physical activities. After about 48 hours, switch to moist heat to stimulate blood flow and reduce painful spasms. Dip a towel in very warm water, wring it out, then flatten and fold it. Lie on your stomach with pillows under your hips and ankles. Place the towel across the painful area, cover the towel with plastic wrap, then put a heating pad - set on medium - atop the plastic. Leave it on for up to 20 minutes. You can repeat this three or four times a day for several days.
    Perfect your posture. Look for the posture that places the least stress on your back. To do it, stand straight with your weight evenly balanced on both feet. Tilt your pelvis forward, then back, exaggerating the movement. Then settle into the position that feels most comfortable. Now 'work your way up' your back, focusing on one area at a time. First concentrate on the area near your waist, then your chest area, and finally your neck and shoulders. Try to feel which position is least stressful and most comfortable. This is the position to maintain when you're standing, walking, and beginning or ending any exercise.
    Rise and shine. Each morning before you get out of bed, lie on your back and slowly stretch your arms overhead. Gently pull your knees to your chest, one at a time. To rise, roll to the edge of your bed, turn on your side, put your knees over the edge, and use one arm to push yourself up as you let your feet swing to the floor. Once you're on your feet, put your hands on your buttocks and lean back very slowly to stretch out your spine.
    Rub in some relief. Ask a partner to massage the aching area. If you want to use a 'back rub' cream or ointment, go ahead, but use caution, as most topical creams produce skin irritation after a few applications. For a simple back massage aid, stuff several tennis balls into a long sock, tie the end of the sock, and have your partner roll it over your back.

    A natural boost

    Pick a pepper product. Your drugstore carries liniments that contain capsaicin, the heat-producing substance in hot peppers. Applied to your skin, capsaicin depletes nerve endings of a neurochemical called substance P. Researchers have found that substance P is essential for transmitting pain sensations to the brain, so when there's less substance P in circulation, the pain meter is turned down a bit. Look for a cream or ointment containing 0.075% or 0.025% capsaicin. And be patient: You may have to use it for several weeks to feel the full effect. Stop using it if you begin to feel any skin irritation.
    Three or four times a day, take 500 milligrams of bromelain. Derived from pineapples, this enzyme promotes circulation, reduces swelling, and helps your body reabsorb the by-products of inflammation. Look for a strength between 1,200 and 2,400 MCU (milk clotting units) or 720 and 1,440 GDU (gelatin dissolving units). Wait for at least an hour after each meal before taking the bromelain, or it will work mainly in your gut instead of your muscles.
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    Risk factors you can change with lifestyle changes.

    Not getting regular exercise
    Doing a job or other activity that requires long periods of sitting, heavy lifting, bending or twisting, repetitive motions, or constant vibration, such as using a jackhammer or driving certain types of heavy equipment
    Smoking People who smoke are more likely than people who don't smoke to have low back pain.
    Being overweight. Excess body weight, especially around the waist, may put strain on your back although this has not been proved. But being overweight often also means being in poor physical condition, with weaker muscles and less flexibility. These can lead to low back pain.
    Having poor posture. Slumping or slouching on its own may not cause low back pain. But after the back has been strained or injured, bad posture can make pain worse. 'Good posture' generally means your ears, shoulders, and hips are in a straight line. If this posture causes pain, you may have another condition such as a problem with a disc or bones in your back.
    Being under stress. Stress and other emotional factors are believed to play a major role in low back pain, particularly chronic low back pain. Many people unconsciously tighten their back muscles when they are under stress.
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    Typically, younger individuals (30 to 60-year-olds) are more likely to experience back pain from a lower back muscle strain or from within the disc space itself - such as a lumbar disc herniation or lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    This article details a description of typical symptoms and their possible causes in younger adults. The next page details typical causes of lower back pain in adults older than age 60.

    Possible Causes: Back muscle strain

    A back muscle strain or ligament strain is one of the most common causes of acute lower back pain. Lifting a heavy object, twisting, or a sudden movement can cause muscles or ligaments stretch or develop microscopic tears.

    Symptoms: Low back pain that travels to the buttock, leg, and foot (sciatica)

    Sciatica includes any combination of the following symptoms:

    Pain typically is ongoing (as opposed to flaring up for a few days or weeks and then subsiding)
    Pain may be worse in the leg and foot than in the lower back
    Typically felt on one side the buttock or leg only
    Pain that is usually worse after long periods of standing still or sitting: relieved somewhat when walking
    More severe (burning, tingling) vs. dull, aching pain
    May be accompanied by weakness, numbness or difficulty moving the leg or foot
    If any Doubts please feel free to contact me.
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