Amulya Pet Specialty Clinic in Fairlands, Salem - Book Appointment, View Contact Number, Feedbacks, Address | Dr. Amarnath Muthukrishnan

Amulya Pet Specialty Clinic

Veterinary Surgeon
50 Recommendations
Practice Statement
Customer service is provided by a highly trained, professional staff who look after your comfort and care and are considerate of your time. Their focus is you.

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Amulya Pet Specialty Clinic is known for housing experienced s. Dr. Amarnath Muthukrishnan, a well-reputed Veterinary Surgeon , practices in Salem. Visit this medical health centre for s recommended by 87 patients.

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Clinic Address
No. 131/1, Advidha Ashrama Road, Vinayagar Kovil Street, Fairlands
Salem, Tamil Nadu - 636016
Details for Dr. Amarnath Muthukrishnan
Veterinary College and Research Institute Hospital - Namakkal
B.V.Sc. & A.H.
University of Edinburgh
Master of sciences
Professional Memberships
Indian Veterinary Association
Veterinary Council of India
World Veterinary Services
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Tamilnadu State Veterinary Council
  • B.V.Sc. & A.H., Master of sciences
    Veterinary Surgeon
    Consultation Charges: Rs 250
    50 Recommendations · 221 people helped
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  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Parasites don't want to kill your kitten or puppy; they just want to use them as a dinner plate! Our goal is to prevent that from happening. Intestinal parasites have been around forever and are not going away, but you can control them with the proper deworming schedule. Hookworms and roundworms are by far the most common intestinal worms found in puppies and kittens. Roundworms compete with your pet for food, while hookworms live on blood, causing anemia.

    Rough hair coats, diarrhea, malnutrition progressing to intestinal obstruction, and anemia are common issues with worms. We want to feed our pets - not the parasites. That is why we deworm dogs and cats. Don't wait until you are sure your pet has parasites because they have already caused damage at this point.


    Strategically deworming dogs and cats is a practice recommended by the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Worms in puppies and kittens are common. This growth phase of their life is when they are most susceptible! Knowing when to worm puppies and kittens is important.
    • Deworm puppies and kittens at 2, 4, 6, & 8 weeks of age, then again at 12 & 16 weeks of age.
    • Deworm again at 6 months and 1 year.
    • Then deworm as an adult.


    We are recommending the standard here. If your dog or cat is a big hunter, they will need more frequent deworming - you must assess the risk for your pet.

    • General Dog or Cat Worming: Thrice a year for life.
    o Dogs put everything in their mouth and need deworming twice a year to eliminate the parasites they will pick up. Deworm outside cats thrice a year for the same reason.
    • Cats that are strictly inside animals: Deworm twice a year.
    • Cats that like to hunt: 3 times a year may be necessary.

    No matter what the history or age, assume they have parasites!
    • Deworm immediately and repeat in 2 weeks.
    • Then put on the above adult program.


    DOGS :
    • Roundworms and Hookworms
    • Roundworms, Hookworms, Whipworms & Tapeworms


    • Tapeworm, Roundworm & Hookworms
       1 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs

    Dogs must never be fed with following people-food. It’s only slow poison for your pets.

    1. Onions & Garlic: These are highly flavored foods and can cause toxicosis in dogs.
    2. Chocolate: Ingestion of chocolate by dogs can cause abdominal pain and vomiting to them due to the presence of theobromine and caffeine.
    3. Avocado: Dogs must never be fed with avocado flesh or skin. Not just avocado fruit but even various parts of avocado tree are fatal for dogs.
    4. Raisins & Grapes: Even slight feeding of raisins or grapes can pose problem to dogs. Their ingestion can cause kidney failure to them.
    5. Nuts: Nuts contain phosphorus that can cause bladder stones in dogs. Ingestion of walnuts and macadamia result in vomiting, joint swelling and muscular pain in dogs.
    6. Xylitol: Xylitol is a sweetener that is very harmful for dogs for it can cause them loss of coordination, seizure and even liver failure.

    If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.
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  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and whip-worms are common among young puppies and kittens. All puppies should be given a dewormer for easily-prevented illness caused by these parasites. Read more about how to prevent parasites in your dog or cat

    Common intestinal parasites in dogs and cats

    You've probably heard the names before

    1. Roundworms, 2. Hookworms, 3. Whip-worms and 4. Tapeworms. These are the intestinal parasites most often seen in pets, and each of them can harm your dog or cat in unique ways.

    Symptoms of intestinal parasites in pets
    While worms are usually found in puppies and kittens, infection can occur in dogs and cats of all ages. Signs of an intestinal parasite infection can include:
    Weight loss
    Swollen stomach
    Death (in severe infestations)

    Note that these signs can also be associated with other diseases so if you observe any of them, you should take your pet in to see your veterinarian for an examination. Diagnosing an intestinal parasite infection is usually done through a laboratory analysis of your pet’s faeces.
    De-worming has become a controversial subject.
    Developing de-worming strategies requires consideration of a several different things, including:
    • What parasites are in the area?
    • Are the risks the same all year round or are they seasonal?
    • What parasites pose a risk to an individual pet or what are the pet’s chances of exposure? (e.g. Does the pet go outside? Is it exposed to many other animals? Are there multiple pets in the household?)
    • Are there any people in the household at particular risk for parasitic infections? (e.g. young children, people with developmental disorders that might be more likely to be exposed to pet faeces?)
    Everyone agrees puppies and kittens need more aggressive de-worming, but there are a few different approaches to managing de-worming in adult animals.
    So as far as myself consider regular de-worming in these schedules:
    Puppy de-worming: (age 40 days – 120 days) preferably suspension
    (I don’t recommend de-worming puppies before 30 days as it may affect their nutritional absorption mechanism and reduce the immunity level, while they are feeding with the dam I think they are well protected. )
    1. Puppy at the age of 40-60 days while doing the primary vaccine
    2. Next second dose at the booster stage around 15 days from the first dose i.e. around 55 days – 75 days.
    3. Third dose is at 90-120 days
    Puppies at 120-180 Days of age: preferably tablet
    De-worming around 180 days is preferable and do consult with your vets for specific drug of choice depending up on breed and their nature of infection they have
    Semi adult dogs 180 – 360 days: preferably tablets
    In this period you can de-worm the puppy either once in 2 months if you have a group or pack of dogs or you can once in three months if you have just one dog with you
    Adult dogs anything above 360 days
    Once in every 3 months i.e.. yearly four times is the recommended Schedule for Asia
    BITCH IN HEAT: special condition
    Should be de-wormed at 4- 5 th day of heat and repeat dosage at 9-10th day second dose and third and final dose is after whelping and after the milking period stops i.e. after whelping 60 days apart best way to maintain the breeding bitch as per standards
    Choosing the right dewormer for your dog
    There are many different types and brands of de-wormers on the MARKET: and determining which dewormer to use, whether to administer it by pill or liquid, and at what dose can depend on a lot of factors.
    Knowing which dewormer to use and at what dose can depend on a variety of things such as the type of intestinal parasite present, and the age, size and current health of your pet. Aside from reading the labels on de-worming products, it’s important to discuss the options and your dog’s unique needs with your veterinarian first.
    Your veterinarian can recommend a product that’s appropriate for your pet after a diagnosis has been made of the type and species of the parasite. In addition, some medications can also be used to help control intestinal parasites. Considering that some parasites can infect people as well as pets, certain de-wormers may be used as a preventive measure to decrease the risk to humans.
       4 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    5 Tips to maintain your Dog’s Dental Health

    It is fairly easy to keep your dog’s teeth and gums healthy provided that you regularly take care of your pet and go for frequent health check-ups. Moreover, conducting regular checks at your home will also go a long way in identifying a problem in its nascent stage.

    Here are five tips to ensure that your dog’s dental health remains perfect.

    1) Prevent tooth decay - If your dog frequently consumes plaque-forming food products, it can lead to subsequent build up on its teeth and ultimately lead to certain problems such as tooth loss, gingivitis and receding gums. Ensure that you clean your dog’s teeth on a daily basis in order to avoid any form of tooth decay.

    2) Check your dog’s breath - Although dog breath is usually not pleasant; if your dog smells unusually foul, you should get a check-up done. Moreover, observe if this foul breath is coupled with other issues such as vomiting, excessive urinating or sudden loss of appetite.

    3) Encourage your dog to play with chew toys - Chew toys assist in providing stronger teeth to your pet, while giving a perfect massage for its gums. In addition, continuous chomping helps remove soft tartar and thus keeps teeth clean. Nylon, rubber and rawhide chew toys are the safest for your dog.

    4) Identify signs of oral disease - A number of oral diseases can be prevented or controlled if they are diagnosed at an early stage. Major symptoms of almost all oral diseases are loose teeth, swollen gums, foul breath, excessive drooling, tumours in the gums and cysts under the tongue.

    5) Carefully examine your dog’s teeth and gums - Healthy gums of a dog are indicated by the fact that they are pink in colour and have no signs of swelling. As for the teeth, they should not have any traces of tartar. Carry out this teeth and gum examination each week by lifting your dog’s lips and observing carefully.

    If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.

    From Lybrate: If you found this tip useful, please thank the doctor by clicking on the heart icon below. Also, spread good health by sharing this tip with your loved ones over WhatsApp, Facebook and other media.
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  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

    1. The Breath Test

    Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

    2. Lip Service

    Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

    3. Signs of Oral Disease

    The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

    Bad breath
    Excessive drooling
    Inflamed gums
    Tumors in the gums
    Cysts under the tongue
    Loose teeth
    4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

    Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

    5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

    Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

    6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

    Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

    First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
    When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
    Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
    Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
    A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
    7. Brushing Technique

    Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

    8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

    Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

    Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
    Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
    Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
    Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
    Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
    Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
    Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
    Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
    9. Chew on This

    chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

    P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

    10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

    Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
       13 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.

    House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

    How Long It Will Take

    Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

    How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

    All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

    House Training Steps

    1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

    2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

    3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

    4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

    5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

    6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

    Additional House Training Tips

    Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
    Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
    Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
    House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

    What NOT to Do

    Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
    Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
    Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
    Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
    Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
    If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
    Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
       19 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

    How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

    You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

    You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

    Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
    Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
    Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
    Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
    If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Hyperthermia is a term describing an elevation in body temperature. This increase typically occurs as a response to a trigger, such as inflammation in the body or a hot environment. When a dog is exposed to high temperatures, heat stroke or heat exhaustion can result. Heat stroke is a very serious condition that requires immediate medical attention.

    Once the signs of heat stroke are detected, there is precious little time before serious damage - or even death - can occur.

    Dogs do not sweat through their skin like humans - they release heat primarily by panting and they sweat through the foot pads and nose. If a dog cannot effectively expel heat, the internal body temperature begins to rise. Once the dog's temperature reaches 106°, damage to the body's cellular system and organs may become irreversible. Unfortunately, too many dogs succumb to heat stroke when it could have been avoided. Learn how to recognize the signs of heat stroke and prevent it from happening to your dog.

    Signs of Heat Stroke

    The following signs may indicate heat stroke in a dog:
    Increased rectal temperature (over 104° requires action, over 106° is a dire emergency)
    Vigorous panting
    Dark red gums
    Tacky or dry mucus membranes (specifically the gums)
    Lying down and unwilling (or unable) to get up
    Collapse and/or loss of consciousness
    Thick saliva
    Dizziness or disorientation

    What to do if You Suspect Heat Stroke

    If you have even the slightest suspicion that your dog is suffering from heat stoke, you must take immediate action.
    First, move your dog out of the heat and away from the sun right away.

    Begin cooling your dog with cool water. You may place wet rags or washcloths on the foot pads and around the head, but replace them frequently as they warm up. Avoid covering the body with wet towels, as it may trap in heat.

    DO NOT use ice or ice water! Extreme cold can cause the blood vessels to constrict, preventing the body's core from cooling and actually causing the internal temperature to further rise. In addition, over-cooling can cause hypothermia, introducing a host of new problems. When the body temperature reaches 103.9°F, stop cooling. At this point, your dog's body should continue cooling on its own.

    Offer your dog cool water, but do not force water into your dog's mouth. Try not to let your dog drink excessive amounts at a time.

    Call or visit your vet right away - even if your dog seems better. Internal damage might not be obvious to the naked eye, so an exam is necessary (and further testing may be recommended).

    Preventing Heat Stroke

    There are ways you can prevent heat stroke from happening in the first place.
    NEVER leave your dog alone in the car on a warm day, regardless of whether the windows are open. Even if the weather outside is not extremely hot, the inside of the car acts like an oven - temperatures can rise to dangerously high levels in a matter of minutes.

    Avoid vigorous exercise on warm days. When outside, opt for shady areas.
    Keep fresh cool water available at all times.

    Certain types of dogs are more sensitive to heat - especially obese dogs and brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds, like Pugs and Bulldogs. Use extreme caution when these dogs are exposed to heat.

    Some dogs can recover fully from heat stroke if it is caught early enough. Others suffer permanent organ damage and require lifelong treatment. Sadly, many dogs do not survive heat stroke. Prevention is the key to keeping your dog safe during warmer weather.
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Top 10 Banned Dog Breeds

    Even though it seems outdated and unfair, breed-specific laws continue to exist across the globe in order to attempt to reduce the number of dangerous dogs. Enforcing these laws is extremely costly and difficult, but certain breeds of dogs continue to be outlawed because they are deemed “threatening.” Here are 10 dog breeds that are currently banned in the world.

    10. Tosa Inu
    Tosa Inus happen to be massive dogs with certain variations that have a weight anywhere between 130 pounds and 200 pounds. They bred to be fighting dogs right from the start and they are legally prohibited in several countries like Denmark, Malta and Norway, where they are regarded as dangerous.

    9. Pit Bulls
    Pit Bulls were originally bred to bait bears and bulls. Several studies have allegedly indicated that Pit Bulls are responsible for up to 45% human attacks by dogs, particularly children. Thus, Pit Bulls are restricted all over the world, especially in Miami and the UK.

    8. Perro de Presa Canario
    Perro de Presa Canarios are large dogs that were originally bred to work lifestock. Early obedience training and socialization is essential for these dogs, and yet they can be aggressive. After reports of killings, this dog breed was banned in Australia and New Zealand.

    7. Neapolitan Mastiff
    Even though Neapolitan Mastiffs are not associated with dangerous dogs, owning them is illegal in Singapore. A psychological evaluation has to be passed by a Neapolitan Mastiff in order to own one in Romania. Fully grown Neapolitan Mastiffs that weigh almost 200 pounds can be dangerous.

    6. Fila Brasileiro
    Also referred to as Brazillian Mastiffs, these large dogs were developed in Brazil. Their tracking abilities tend to be remarkable, but at the same time, their aggressiveness and strength tends to be quite terrible. Perhaps this is why Denmark, Israel, Malta, Norway and the UK banned this dog breed.

    5. Dogo Argentino
    These large and white muscular dogs were developed in Argentina mainly for big-game hunting, especially puma and wild boar. Although they were bred not be aggressive, they happen to be athletic and extremely strong. Thus, owning a Dogo in Australia, New Zealand, Portugal and the UK is illegal.

    4. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
    The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is just one example of wolf hybrid breeds, many of which are illegal to keep as pets. There have been particular reports about attacks by wolfdog breeds, especially on children who are viewed as prey items, which is just one example that they possess wolf-like instincts.

    3. Boerboel
    Boerboels were originally bred to guard the homestead. There was a time when they were a first line of denfese against predators like hyenas, lions and other big cats. However, after being recognized as fighting dogs, this breed was banned in Denmark in 2010.

    2. American Bulldog
    American bulldogs are heavy muscular dogs. Despite being known for their friendly and pleasant demeanor, American Bulldogs tend to be extremely confident as a result of which they exhibit the trait of “stubbornness.” They were banned in Denmark and Singapore after reports of fatal attacks.

    1. American Bandogge
    These muscular looking dogs have been using for fighting, even though they were not originally bred for this purpose. Since they are a cross breed between the American Pit Bull Terrier breed and the Neapolitan Mastiff breed, so they are prohibited in places where those two breeds are illegal.

    Indeed, the reports of aggressiveness and attacks by these dog breeds cannot be denied. However, the fact remains whether it was the fault of the animals or their owners. Whatever the case, these were top 10 banned dog breeds.
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  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
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  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

    Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.

    Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

    Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.

    Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

    Complete and Balanced

    It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

    Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

    A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

    Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.


    Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

    Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

    Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

    Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

    Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

    Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

    Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

    Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.

    Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

    Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

    Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

    Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

    Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

    Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

    Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

    Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

    Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

    Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

    Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

    Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

    Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

    Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.

    Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

    Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

    Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

    Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

    Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

    Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

    Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.
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  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    What Makes Chocolate Poisonous to Dogs?

    Chocolate is made from cocoa, and cocoa beans contain caffeine and a related chemical compound called theobromine, which is the real danger.

    The problem is that dogs metabolize theobromine much more slowly than humans, reported by Denver veterinarian Kevin Fitzgerald, PhD, tells WebMD.

    “The buzz we get from eating chocolate may last 20 to 40 minutes, but for dogs it lasts many hours,” he says. “After 17 hours, half of the theobromine a dog has ingested is still in the system.”

    Theobromine is also toxic to cats, but there are very few reported cases of theobromine poisoning in felines because they rarely eat chocolate.

    Dogs, on the other hand, will eat just about anything.

    Even small amounts of chocolate can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. Truly toxic amounts can induce hyperactivity, tremors, high blood pressure, a rapid heart rate, seizures, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest.
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  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
       1 Thanks
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Dear clients still 10 days left for our celebration of programme PAWS-2014
  • Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
    Dogs need to wash to keep comfortable much like we do. They feel more comfortable and less irritable because they are clean. As such, you may well notice that your dog’s temperament improves with regular grooming. Similarly, the personal attention that they are getting will also improve their outlook and their overall attitude.

    Enhancing Bonding - This is the main advantage of grooming your dog
    yourself. You can actively look to form a bond with your dog that goes above
    and beyond any other bond. The close personal attention that your dog gets
    does not come in any other form and the shared experience can really make
    you feel a connection to your dog that is founded on that.

    Grooming is an essential element of the care of a dog. Every single owner should have a basic working knowledge of how to groom their dogs because it makes an awful lot of difference to not only how a dog looks but also to how he or she feels. A clean and well groomed dog is generally happier than a dirty and matted dog for a number of reasons. Firstly, groomed dogs have had personal attention from their owners and so are more contented as a result. They are also more secure in their position within a family as a result of the care and the bond that has been forged between owner and dog. Furthermore, well groomed dogs are often healthier because any health issues that arise can be spotted quickly and easily.

    All of the above aside, it is an owner’s responsibility to look after a dog as well as possible and the basics of grooming do not require much effort to learn. However, you need to have a good basic knowledge of grooming tools and how they can be used to improve the overall appearance of your dogs.
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