Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Ravichandran

Dentist, Chennai

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Ravichandran Dentist, Chennai
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Ravichandran
Dr. Ravichandran is a trusted Dentist in Moulivakkam, Chennai. You can visit him/her at Vidhya Dental care in Moulivakkam, Chennai. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Ravichandran on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Dentists in India. You will find Dentists with more than 36 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Dentists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Ravichandran

Vidhya Dental care

Door no, 100, malligai street, Sathya narayana puram, Moulivakkam, ChennaiChennai Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Ravichandran

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Flossing is as important as brushing on a daily basis

BDS
Dentist, Delhi
Flossing is as important as brushing on a daily basis
Flossing is as important as brushing on a daily basis. Taking the floss all the way down to the point where the teeth and gums meet is the appropriate way of doing it.
175 people found this helpful

Why Dental Cleaning and Polishing???

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
Why Dental Cleaning and Polishing???

What are dental cleanings (scale and polish) and why have them?

Dental cleanings involve removing plaque (soft, sticky, bacteria infested film) and tartar (calculus) deposits that have built up on the teeth over time. Your teeth are continually bathed in saliva which contains calcium and other substances which help strengthen and protect the teeth. While this is a good thing, it also means that we tend to get a build-up of calcium deposits on the teeth. This chalky substance will eventually build up over time, like limescale in a pipe or kettle. Usually, it is tooth coloured and can easily be mistaken as part of the teeth, but it also can vary from brown to black in colour.

If the scale or calculus (tartar, as dentists like to call it) is allowed to accumulate on the teeth it will, unfortunately, provide the right conditions for bacteria to thrive next to the gums. The purpose of the cleaning and polishing is basically to leave the surfaces of the teeth clean and smooth so that bacteria are unable to stick to them and you have a better chance of keeping the teeth clean during your regular home care.Also it leaves your teeth feeling lovely and smooth and clean, which is nice when you run your tongue around them. Actually, come to think of it, there's nothing worse than someone you fancy running their tongue around your teeth and finding a piece of spinach or something! Still, if they're hungry

The professional cleaning of teeth is sometimes referred to as prophylaxis (orprophy for short). It's a Greek word which means 'to prevent beforehand' - in this case, it helps prevent gum disease.

How are dental cleanings done?

The dental hygienist or dentist uses specialized instruments to gently remove these deposits without harming the teeth. The instruments which may be used during your cleaning, and what they feel like, are described below.

Ultrasonic instrument

Commonly used first is an ultrasonic instrument which uses tickling vibrations to knock larger pieces of tartar loose. It also sprays a cooling mist of water while it works to wash away debris and keep the area at a proper temperature. The device typically emits a humming or high pitched whistling sound. This may seem louder than it actually is because the sound may get amplified inside your head, just like when you put an electric toothbrush into your mouth.

The ultrasonic instrument tips are curved and rounded and are always kept in motion around the teeth. They are by no means sharp since their purpose is to knock tartar loose and not to cut into the teeth. It is best to inform the operator if the sensations are too strong or ticklish so that they can adjust the setting appropriately on the device or modify the pressure applied.

With larger deposits that have hardened on, it can take some time to remove these, just like trying to remove baked-on grime on a stove that has been left over a long time. So your cleaning may take longer than future cleanings. Imagine not cleaning a house for six months versus cleaning it every week. The six-month job is going to take longer than doing smaller weekly jobs.


Fine hand tools

Once the larger pieces of tartar are gone, the dental worker will switch to finer hand tools (called scalers and curettes in dental-speak) to remove smaller deposits and smoothen the tooth surfaces. These tools are curved and shaped to match the curves of the teeth. They allow smaller tartar deposits to be removed bycarefully scraping them off with a gentle to moderate amount of pressure. Just like taking a scrubbing brush to a soiled pot, the dental worker has to get the areas clean and smooth.

Polishing

Once all the surfaces are smooth, the dental worker may polish your teeth. Polishing is done using a slow speed handpiece with a soft rubber cup that spins on the end. Prophylaxis (short for prophy) paste - a special gritty toothpaste-like material - is scooped up like ice cream into the cup and spun around on the teeth to make them shiny smooth.

Fluoride


Your dentist may also apply fluoride. This is the final, and my favorite part of the dental cleaning! Fluoride comes in many different flavours such as chocolate, mint, strawberry, cherry, watermelon, pina colada and can be mixed and matched just like ice cream at a parlour for a great taste sensation! Make no mistake though, this in-office fluoride treatment is meant for topical use only on the surfaces of the teeth and swallowing excessive amounts can give a person a tummy ache as it is not meant to be ingested.

Fluoride foam or gel is then placed into small, flexible foam trays and placed over the teeth for 30 seconds. Afterwards, the patient is directed to spit as much out as possible into a saliva ejector. The fluoride helps to strengthen the teeth since the acids from bacteria in dental tartar and plaque will have weakened the surfaces. It is best not to eat, drink or rinse for 30 minutes after the fluoride has been applied.

Is it going to be painful?

Most people find that cleanings are painless, and find the sensations described above - tickling vibrations, the cooling mist of water, and the feeling of pressure during 'scraping' - do not cause discomfort. A lot of people even report that they enjoy cleanings and the lovely smooth feel of their teeth afterwards! There may be odd zingy sensations, but many people don't mind as they only last a nanosecond.

Be sure to let your dentist/hygienist know if you find things are getting too uncomfortable for your liking. They can recommend various options to make the cleaning more enjoyable.

Painful cleaning experiences can be caused by a number of things: a rough dentist or hygienist, exposed dentine (not dangerous, but can make cleanings unpleasant), or sore gum tissues.

In case you may have had painful cleaning experiences in the past, switching to a gentle hygienist/dentist and perhaps a spot of nitrous oxide can often make all the difference. You could also choose to be numbed. If you find the scaling a bit uncomfortable because the gum tissues (rather than the teeth themselves) are sensitive, topical numbing gels can be used.

 

1 person found this helpful

DIABETIC and Your SMILE

BDS
Dentist, Rajouri
DIABETIC and Your SMILE

Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the united states have diabetes? that's 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don't even know they have it. 

Diabetes affects your body's ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In type I diabetes, the body doesn't make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In type ii diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body.

So what does this have to do with that smile of yours and how can you protect it? first, it's important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth.

The symptoms of untreated diabetes

The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. 

If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how:

You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. (dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.)
Because saliva protects your teeth, you're also at a higher risk of cavities.
Gums may become inflamed and bleed often (gingivitis).
You may have problems tasting food.
You may experience delayed wound healing.
You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth.
For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlier than is typical.
Why people with diabetes are more prone to gum disease

All people have more tiny bacteria living in their mouth now than there are people on this planet. If they make their home in your gums, you can end up with periodontal disease. This chronic, inflammatory disease can destroy your gums, all the tissues holding your teeth and even your bones.

Periodontal disease is the most common dental disease affecting those living with diabetes, affecting nearly 22% of those diagnosed. Especially with increasing age, poor blood sugar control increases the risk for gum problems. In fact, people with diabetes are at a higher risk for gum problems because of poor blood sugar control. As with all infections, serious gum disease may cause blood sugar to rise. This makes diabetes harder to control because you are more susceptible to infections and are less able to fight the bacteria invading the gums.

How your dentist can help you fight diabetes

Regular dental visits are important. Research suggests that treating gum disease can help improve blood sugar control in patients living with diabetes, decreasing the progression of the disease. Practicing good oral hygiene and having professional deep cleanings done by your dentist can help to lower your hba1c. (this is a lab test that shows your average level of blood sugar over the previous three months. It indicates how well you are controlling your diabetes.)

Your diabetes dental health action plan

Teamwork involving self-care and professional care from your dentist will be beneficial in keeping your healthy smile as well as potentially slowing progression of diabetes. Here are five oral health-related things you can do to for optimal wellness:

Control your blood sugar levels. Use your diabetes-related medications as directed, changing to a healthier diet and even exercising more can help. Good blood sugar control will also help your body fight any bacterial or fungal infections in your mouth and help relieve dry mouth caused by diabetes.
Avoid smoking.
If you wear any type of denture, clean it each day.
Make sure to brush twice a day with a soft brush and floss correctly daily.
See your dentist for regular checkup.

3 people found this helpful

Hi. I got the retainers today but if I worn both. I couldn't able to talk properly. What to do. Doctor told. If like this I can wear top of the retainer. Is it okay? Mine is night shift. I am having confusion to which time I should wear this. I think sleeping time I should not wear. Kindly help.

BDS, FICOI, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE)
Dentist, Bangalore
Hi. I got the retainers today but if I worn both. I couldn't able to talk properly. What to do. Doctor told. If like ...
If you stop wearing retainers then your treatment will relapse, kindly wear retainers on time, initially you will feel discomfort but as time goes it will adapt to you and you will be fine, my advise to you is you need to have patience since retainers takes time to adapt, initially you feel little discomfort and irritation. But you have to wear it.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello sir/madam I am facing the problem of bark in mouth. They occur very frequently. I take several medicines but don't get permanent solution, currently I am taking betnesol & bikasul caplsules, please advise what to do ?

These may be related to stress and tension. Do some meditation or yoga for a permanent solution. Use aloevera gel, it gives relief sometimes. Continue the tablets which you are taking.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi, Seems like My wisdom teeth is not growing as it should be. It has already been taken approx 3 months. Please advice. Thanks, Jogendra.

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
Hi,
Seems like My wisdom teeth is not growing as it should be. It has already been taken approx 3 months. Please advi...
Kindly get a full mouth xray done to check for the positioning of the wisdom teeth. And later. Wisdom teeth usually erupts between the age of 17 to 25. It really depends on the jaw size too. Kindly get a check up done at the dentist.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Wisdom Tooth!

MDS - Orthodontics, BDS
Dentist, Meerut
Wisdom Tooth!

Wisdom Tooth!

Please suggest. I have teeth problem. Some time blood come from teeth. So how to wash teeth properly.

BDS, MDS Endodontist
Dentist, Gurgaon
Please suggest. I have teeth problem. Some time blood come from teeth. So how to wash teeth properly.
First go for professional teeth cleaning and polishing of teeth. DO warm saline rinses 3 times daily for 3 weeks.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am loosing strength of my teeth. I guess it is because of the heat of this hot burning summer. If am right kindly suggest me some remedies. And help me regain my full strong teeth.

BDS, MDS
Dentist, Jaipur
I am loosing strength of my teeth. I guess it is because of the heat of this hot burning summer. If am right kindly s...
Teeth do not change due to summer. get your teeth cleaned professionally and polishing. maintain oral hygiene by brushing twice a day and use mouthwash regularly.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi. Sir. Actually mere teeth bhut zyada kharab h uper aur neeche dono hi teeth m bhut zyada gap h jo bura lgta h in k treatment m kitna kharcha ayega aur kitna time lgega kya ap bta sakte h.

MDS
Dentist, Kolkata
Hi. Sir. Actually mere teeth bhut zyada kharab h uper aur neeche dono hi teeth m bhut zyada gap h jo bura lgta h in k...
Hello, i cannot tell u the cost of the treatment as it varies from place to place,,but get clipping done i.e braces.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed