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Dr. Anitha Barthasarathy

Gynaecologist, Chennai

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Dr. Anitha Barthasarathy Gynaecologist, Chennai
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Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. Anitha Barthasarathy
Dr. Anitha Barthasarathy is an experienced Gynaecologist in Indira Nagar, Chennai. She is currently associated with Sri PadmaPriya Hospital in Indira Nagar, Chennai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Anitha Barthasarathy on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Gynaecologists in India. You will find Gynaecologists with more than 42 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Gynaecologists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Sri PadmaPriya Hospital

No.28, 1st Avenue, Indira Nagar,Adyar. Landmark: Near Adyar Post Office & Near Adyar Petrol Bunk, ChennaiChennai Get Directions
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Hello Doctor please tell me whether use of butter or ghee is good for pregnant women.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, DGO, Diploma in Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Jalgaon
Hello Doctor please tell me whether use of butter or ghee is good for pregnant women.
You can give it in limitations. Excess will not be absorbed and will lead to diarrhoea, will hamper more easily digestable cabohydrate intake, leading to mal nourishment of foetus.
1 person found this helpful
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I am just 18 years old, i am in a physical relationship with my boyfriend from last 4 years, now i am not having periods from last 5 months, i have used pregnancy kit also but its showing negative. Sometimes i used to get stomach pain a lot. Please help.

BHMS
Homeopath, Vadodara
Dear U are suffering from amenorrhea if upt test negative as u said. Start take following homoeopathic medicine pulsatilla pratensis 30/ 4pills three times a day for 10 days follow up me after 10 days regard Dr Rajesh Suthar
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consume high thermic effecting food in this cool cool winter season

3 months Internship of Dietitics/Nutrition, PG diploma in Dietitics/Nutrition, M.Sc - Dietitics / Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Moradabad
consume high thermic effecting food in this cool cool winter season
During winter we should eat food, which has high thermic effect as it boosts our metabolism and keeps us active and warm through out day. High protein food like poultry, fish, pork, ham etc and complex carbohydrates food like wholegrain products, green and colored vegetables etc have high thermic effect.
*eating a variety of food in sensible proportions in winter should include:
6 daily servings of complex carbohydrates,
5 servings of fruits or yoghurt
2 servings of protein,
15-25 gms of fats and oil
Many of things have beneficial implications especially during winters. For example:
Red wine: it keeps you warm, and the key are two antioxidants found in the skin of grapes - reveratrol and anthocyanins as they help to neutralize the free oxygen radical that damages the artery and has potent anti cancer effect.
Coffee: a hot cup of magic beans has caffeine, considered a major source of antioxidants that help lower the risk of diabetes, and has been linked to reduction in colon cancer for women, lower risk of gout in men.
Chocolate: dark chocolates are better because of high cocoa content which is packed with flavonoid they prevent heart disease and cancer.
Saffron: it improves digestion, stimulates circulation and reduces high blood pressure. Its also as anti depressant. It enhances the activity of mood boosting neuro- transmitters, dopamine and nonrepinephrine.
8 people found this helpful

Endometriosis: Signs and Symptoms You Might Be Suffering From It!

MBBS, MS - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, DNB - Obstetrics & Gynecology - Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gynaecologist, Ghaziabad
Endometriosis: Signs and Symptoms You Might Be Suffering From It!

Endometriosis is an often painful disorder in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus. Endometriosis most commonly involves your ovaries, fallopian tubes and the tissue lining your pelvis. Rarely, endometrial tissue may spread beyond pelvic organs.

With endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it normally would — it thickens, breaks down and bleeds with each menstrual cycle. Because this displaced tissue has no way to exit your body, it becomes trapped. When endometriosis involves the ovaries, cysts called endometriomas may form. Surrounding tissue can become irritated, eventually developing scar tissue and adhesions — abnormal bands of fibrous tissue that can cause pelvic tissues and organs to stick to each other.

Endometriosis can cause pain — sometimes severe — especially during your period. Fertility problems also may develop. Fortunately, effective treatments are available.

Symptoms

The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain, often associated with your menstrual period. Although many women experience cramping during their menstrual period, women with endometriosis typically describe menstrual cramp that's far worse than usual. They also tend to report that the pain increases over time.

Common Signs and Symptoms of Endometriosis may include:

  • Painful periods (dysmenorrhea). Pelvic pain and cramping may begin before your period and extend several days into your period. You may also have lower back and abdominal pain.

  • Pain with intercourse. Pain during or after sex is common with endometriosis.

  • Pain with bowel movements or urination. You're most likely to experience these symptoms during your period.

  • Excessive bleeding. You may experience occasional heavy periods (menorrhagia) or bleeding between periods (menometrorrhagia).

  • Infertility. Endometriosis is first diagnosed in some women who are seeking treatment for infertility.

  • Other symptoms. You may also experience fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, bloating or nausea, especially during menstrual periods.

The severity of your pain isn't necessarily a reliable indicator of the extent of the condition. Some women with mild endometriosis have intense pain, while others with advanced endometriosis may have little pain or even no pain at all.

Endometriosis is sometimes mistaken for other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or ovarian cysts. It may be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a condition that causes bouts of diarrhea, constipation and abdominal cramping. IBS can accompany endometriosis, which can complicate the diagnosis.

When to see a doctor

See the doctor if you have signs and symptoms that may indicate endometriosis.

Endometriosis can be a challenging condition to manage. An early diagnosis, a multidisciplinary medical team and an understanding of your diagnosis may result in better management of your symptoms.

Causes

Although the exact cause of endometriosis is not certain, possible explanations include:

  • Retrograde menstruation. In retrograde menstruation, menstrual blood containing endometrial cells flows back through the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity instead of out of the body. These displaced endometrial cells stick to the pelvic walls and surfaces of pelvic organs, where they grow and continue to thicken and bleed over the course of each menstrual cycle.

  • Transformation of peritoneal cells. In what's known as the "induction theory," experts propose that hormones or immune factors promote transformation of peritoneal cells — cells that line the inner side of your abdomen — into endometrial cells.

  • Embryonic cell transformation. Hormones such as estrogen may transform embryonic cells — cells in the earliest stages of development — into endometrial cell implants during puberty.

  • Surgical scar implantation. After a surgery, such as a hysterectomy or C-section, endometrial cells may attach to a surgical incision.

  • Endometrial cells transport. The blood vessels or tissue fluid (lymphatic) system may transport endometrial cells to other parts of the body.

  • Immune system disorder. It's possible that a problem with the immune system may make the body unable to recognize and destroy endometrial tissue that's growing outside the uterus.

Risk factors

Several factors place you at greater risk of developing endometriosis, such as:

  • Never giving birth

  • Starting your period at an early age

  • Going through menopause at an older age

  • Short menstrual cycles — for instance, less than 27 days

  • Having higher levels of estrogen in your body or a greater lifetime exposure to estrogen your body produces

  • Low body mass index

  • Alcohol consumption

  • One or more relatives (mother, aunt or sister) with endometriosis

  • Any medical condition that prevents the normal passage of menstrual flow out of the body

  • Uterine abnormalities

Endometriosis usually develops several years after the onset of menstruation (menarche). Signs and symptoms of endometriosis end temporarily with pregnancy and end permanently with menopause, unless you're taking estrogen.

Complications

Infertility

The main complication of endometriosis is impaired fertility. Approximately one-third to one-half of women with endometriosis have difficulty getting pregnant. Endometriosis may obstruct the tube and keep the egg and sperm from uniting. But the condition also seems to affect fertility in less-direct ways, such as damage to the sperm or egg. Inspite of this, many women with mild to moderate endometriosis can still conceive and carry a pregnancy to term. Doctors sometimes advise women with endometriosis not to delay having children because the condition may worsen with time.

Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer does occur at higher than expected rates in women with endometriosis. Although rare, another type of cancer — endometriosis-associated adenocarcinoma — can develop later in life in women who have had endometriosis.

Diagnosis: To diagnose endometriosis and other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, the doctor will ask you to describe your symptoms, including the location of your pain and when it occurs.

Tests to check for physical clues of endometriosis include:

  • Pelvic exam. During a pelvic exam, the doctor manually feels (palpates) areas in your pelvis for abnormalities, such as cysts on your reproductive organs or scars behind your uterus. Often it's not possible to feel small areas of endometriosis, unless they've caused a cyst to form.

  • Ultrasound. A transducer, a device that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the inside of your body, is either pressed against your abdomen or inserted into your vagina (transvaginal ultrasound). Both types of ultrasound may be done to get the best view of your reproductive organs. Ultrasound imaging won't definitively tell the doctor whether you have endometriosis, but it can identify cysts associated with endometriosis (endometriomas).

  • Laparoscopy. Medical management is usually tried first. But to be certain you have endometriosis, the doctor may advise a surgical procedure called laparoscopy to look inside your abdomen for signs of endometriosis.

While you're under general anesthesia, the doctor makes a tiny incision near your navel and inserts a slender viewing instrument (laparoscope), looking for endometrial tissue outside the uterus. He or she may take samples of tissue (biopsy). Laparoscopy can provide information about the location, extent and size of the endometrial implants to help determine the best treatment options.

Treatment for endometriosis is usually with medications or surgery. The approach you and the doctor choose will depend on the severity of your signs and symptoms and whether you hope to become pregnant.

Generally, doctors recommend trying conservative treatment approaches first, opting for surgery as a last resort.

Pain medications

The doctor may recommend that you take an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen (Aleve, others), to help ease painful menstrual cramps.

If you find that taking the maximum dose of these medications doesn't provide full relief, you may need to try another approach to manage your signs and symptoms.

Hormone therapy

Supplemental hormones are sometimes effective in reducing or eliminating the pain of endometriosis. The rise and fall of hormones during the menstrual cycle causes endometrial implants to thicken, break down and bleed. Hormone medication may slow endometrial tissue growth and prevent new implants of endometrial tissue.

Hormone therapy isn't a permanent fix for endometriosis. You could experience a return of your symptoms after stopping treatment.

Therapies used to treat endometriosis include:

  • Hormonal contraceptives. Birth control pills, patches and vaginal rings help control the hormones responsible for the buildup of endometrial tissue each month. Most women have lighter and shorter menstrual flow when they're using a hormonal contraceptive. Using hormonal contraceptives — especially continuous cycle regimens — may reduce or eliminate the pain of mild to moderate endometriosis.

  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) agonists and antagonists. These drugs block the production of ovarian-stimulating hormones, lowering estrogen levels and preventing menstruation. This causes endometrial tissue to shrink. Because these drugs create an artificial menopause, taking a low dose of estrogen or progestin along with Gn-RH agonists and antagonists may decrease menopausal side effects, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness and bone loss. Your periods and the ability to get pregnant return when you stop taking the medication.

  • Progestin therapy. A progestin-only contraceptive, such as an intrauterine device (Mirena), contraceptive implant or contraceptive injection (Depo-Provera), can halt menstrual periods and the growth of endometrial implants, which may relieve endometriosis signs and symptoms.

  • Danazol. This drug suppresses the growth of the endometrium by blocking the production of ovarian-stimulating hormones, preventing menstruation and the symptoms of endometriosis. However, danazol may not be the first choice because it can cause serious side effects and can be harmful to the baby if you become pregnant while taking this medication.

Conservative surgery

If you have endometriosis and are trying to become pregnant, surgery to remove as much endometriosis as possible while preserving your uterus and ovaries (conservative surgery) may increase your chances of success. If you have severe pain from endometriosis, you may also benefit from surgery — however, endometriosis and pain may return.

The doctor may do this procedure laparoscopically or through traditional abdominal surgery in more extensive cases.

Assisted reproductive technologies

Assisted reproductive technologies, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) to help you become pregnant are sometimes preferable to conservative surgery. Doctors often suggest one of these approaches if conservative surgery doesn't work. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gynaecologist.

4034 people found this helpful

Last time I got my periods was lst month 5th dis month till 2 day ie 21 din t get my periods aft 10 days ie on 15 I started eating cycle reg fr 4 days but still I din t get my periods and I checked pregnancy test at home it z negative and oso got a scanning done showing no formation of gest sac on 18th of this month .wht may be the cause of delay.

BHMS
Homeopath, Howrah
Last time I got my periods was lst month 5th dis month till 2 day ie 21 din t get my periods aft 10 days ie on 15 I s...
Sometimes hormonal imbalances cause delay in menses. If you have your earlier normal period then wait for some days. it will occur naturally. If not consult for medicine.
1 person found this helpful
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Hello sir/madam Two of my friends are in trouble Thing is they had sex without safety Girl is19 year-old and boy is20. Girls is not getting periods from a month but they had sex on last Saturday and she took I pill. So does the fertilization takes place or not? She won't be pregnant right?

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Ludhiana
Hello sir/madam
Two of my friends are in trouble Thing is they had sex without safety Girl is19 year-old and boy is20...
If she took IPILL within 72 hours of having sex,then probality chances of getting pregnant are almost zero.Secondly chances of pregnancy depends upon her Menstrual cycle if IPILL taken after 72 hours.
3 people found this helpful
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I had unprotected sex 3 days before my period took an ipill after 33 hours and had sex again after 4 days took an ipill within one hour my periods was delayed for almost 4 days and now I'm feeling allot of pain and it's just like the period pain but it's severe, is it my periods? Or Is it cuz of ipill? Am I safe from pregnancy? My cycle is 28-29! Will I get my periods?

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, FCPS, DGO, Diploma of the Faculty of Family Planning (DFFP)
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
I had unprotected sex 3 days before my period took an ipill after 33 hours and had sex again after 4 days took an ipi...
If pain severe consult Gynecologist. After I pill one gets withdrawal bleeding 7-10 days later meaning if period was expected during that time it gets post-ponned and then cyclicity of period changes.
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Hi I have my girlfriend her age is 28 and 55kg weight often we talk each other on different topics and my girlfriend feeling wet when we talk about sex. When we start romance aftr 3 minutes she is feeling wet and little fluid comes out. Is it ok? Please tell me.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Hi I have my girlfriend her age is 28 and 55kg weight often we talk each other on different topics and my girlfriend ...
That is absolutely normal responce to get wet. Body produces this liquid from bartholin gland to facilitate penile insertin or sex. It also suggest that her hormones are also normal.
2 people found this helpful
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I am 23 year female and my MC is not regular also because of this my weight is also increased what should I do?

Advanced Aesthetics
Ayurveda, Gulbarga
I am 23 year female and my MC is not regular also because of this my weight is also increased what should I do?
Home Remedies for Irregular Periods, such as eating disorders, significant weight loss or gain, anemia, menopause, thyroid disorders, hormonal imbalance, liver disease, tuberculosis, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, recent birth or miscarriage, polycystic ovarian syndrome, uterine abnormalities, and other health conditions. Lifestyle triggers like increased exercise, smoking, alcohol abuse, caffeine, travel, stress, and certain medications and birth control pills can also contribute to this problem. Treatmet home remedies Turmeric Being a warming herb, turmeric is also considered helpful in regulating menstruation and balancing hormones. Its emmenagogue properties help stimulate menstrual flow. Moreover, its antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory properties relieve menstrual pain. •Consume one-quarter teaspoon of turmeric with milk, honey or jaggery. Take it daily for several weeks or until you see improvement. •You can also take turmeric in supplement form; consult your doctor for proper dosage A combination of dried mint and honey serves as a good Ayurvedic remedy for irregular menstrual periods. It also helps ease menstrual cramps. 1.Simply consume one teaspoon of dried mint powder mixed with one teaspoon of honey. Repeat three times a day for several weeks
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Hello. I am 31 years old lady. I had two miscarriages. Now I take a test of HSG it shows tubes block. Right tube block and left tube grades appearance at end.

MBBS, DGO, MD, Fellowship in Gynae Oncology
Gynaecologist, Delhi
Hello. I am 31 years old lady. I had two miscarriages. Now I take a test of HSG it shows tubes block. Right tube bloc...
Hello, Since you have had two miscarriages, it's high time as your are 31 years old that you visit an infertility specialist for further evaluation before it's too late. The fertility doctor will evaluate you and your partner for fertility and will suggest a treatment to help you have a baby.
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