Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Book
Call

Dr. S Yathiraj

B.V.Sc, M.V.Sc(Med), Ph.D-Veterinary

Veterinarian, Bangalore

40 Years Experience
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. S Yathiraj B.V.Sc, M.V.Sc(Med), Ph.D-Veterinary Veterinarian, Bangalore
40 Years Experience
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services

Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. S Yathiraj
Dr. S Yathiraj is an experienced Veterinarian in Basavanagudi, Bangalore. He has been a successful Veterinarian for the last 40 years. He studied and completed B.V.Sc, M.V.Sc(Med), Ph.D-Veterinary . You can consult Dr. S Yathiraj at Lakeside Veterinary Clinic & Diagnostic Centre in Basavanagudi, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. S Yathiraj and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 28 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
B.V.Sc - Veterinary College, Bangalore, - 1978
M.V.Sc(Med) - Veterinary College, Bangalore, - 1980
Ph.D-Veterinary - - 2003
Languages spoken
English

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. S Yathiraj

Lakeside Veterinary Clinic & Diagnostic Centre

#21/83, Ramachandra Arcade, South End Road, Basavanagudi, Landmark: Below Balaji MedicalsBangalore Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. S Yathiraj

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My dog is a french bulldog and is not eating his food past 2 days he is only eating biscuits

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Provide liquid diet for 3-4 days. Keep under shade in the sunny part of day. Take for walking in the late evenings. Give good excercise in the evenings and then offer well balanced diet.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello my dear sir. A injured sparrow suffering with problem. The sparrow fall into gum and its one side wing has wounded. It can't use its one side wing. What can I do now. Please reply me as soon as possible.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
U can clean the whole body with luke warm water gently and tie that wing close to the body for healing. This is to make sure the sparrow doesn't use that wing for any purpose for few days and allow any possible healing faster. Another option is to go to a Vet in person who has the experience on birds, get an X- Ray and overall status of what exactly has happened inside and it's prognosis.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi my male gsd has turned 1 this April and I want to nueter him also he has developed umbilical hernia, both the operations at same time now is it okay for my dogs health?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
ye it is better to opeate two thing in on ananesthesia so animal is not under anaesthesia twice if proper care is taken then both wound will heal nicely and dog is free of pain for life
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
TAKING CARE OF PETS

Dog hygiene
Risk of transmission from contact with dogs is low and may be further reduced by simple precautions.
Dogs should be seen by a veterinarian on a regular basis.
Dogs should be treated promptly for diarrhea.
Dogs should be vaccinated for rabies.
Dogs should be treated to prevent heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis).
Effective flea control requires treatment of affected dogs, their environment, and other animals they contact.
Dogs should be fed high quality commercial food.
Dogs should not eat raw meat or eggs. Raw meat may have higher rates of Campylobacter and Salmonella in their stools
Dogs should not be allowed to eat garbage, feces, or hunt.
Dogs should not be allowed to drink non-potable water (e.G, surface water or toilet water).
Dogs should be inspected for ticks regularly.
Dog owners should wash their hands following contact with or cleaning up dog feces.
Groups at high risk for serious infection from pets include: Persons with waning immunity (e.G, older adults); children less than five years old; pregnant women and immunocompromised patients with AIDS, those without a functioning spleen or taking immunosuppressive therapy
To avoid infections, people at higher risk should take particular precautions with any animal contact.
They should do thorough and frequent hand wash
They should avoid contact with animals and their environment (e.G, pens, bedding and manure).
HIV positive patients should carry following precautions
When obtaining a new pet, they should avoid animals aged 6 months (or 1 year for cats)
They should be cautious when obtaining a pet from pet-breeding facilities, pet stores, and animal shelters, because of highly variable hygienic and sanitary conditions.
They should avoid stray animals.
They should avoid contact with any animal that has diarrhea.
They should seek veterinary care for animals with diarrheal illness, and a fecal sample from such animals should be examined for Cryptosporidium, Salmonella and Campylobacter.
They should wash their hands after handling pets, including before eating, and should avoid contact with pets' feces.
They should avoid contact with reptiles (e.G, snakes, lizards, iguanas, and turtles) as well as chicks and ducklings because of the risk for salmonellosis.
They should wear gloves during aquarium cleaning to reduce the risk for infection with Mycobacterium marinum.
They should avoid contact with exotic pets (e.G, nonhuman primates).
3 people found this helpful

Sir I have given normetro syrup to my puppy is this safe have given him 2 ml only.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
Yes you can give the syrup to your pup, but kindly calculate the dose rate of the syrup according your pup body weight and give.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I want to make home food for my 2 month old kitten. What else can I mix with mashed rice and fish broth (suggested by vet). I mean vitamins, medicines, food items etc.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
I want to make home food for my 2 month old kitten. What else can I mix with mashed rice and fish broth (suggested by...
You can give only fish and vitamins and mineral mix Cats donot need any CArbohydrates like rice or wheat best is to give your cat boiled fish or chicken and lots of fish/ chiken soup.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a dog. Who is 2 month old. So I want to know about her food & diet? As she vomits vry frequently aftr eating anything.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Just give soft gruel kind of food n check. Like cerelac etc. If vilomiting immediately without squeezing the stomach, that means your puppy has megaesophagus. Which is not good.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed